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The Tyrolese Minstrels

March 16, 2013

The Tyrolese Minstrels, from a photograph taken by Richard Beard, by desire of H.R.H. The Duchess of Kent
(from The Illustrated London News, London, Saturday, 6 December 1851, p. 699)

THE TYROLESE MINSTRELS.
‘The company of artistes who sing the music of the Tyrol comprise Mdlle. Margreiter, Simon, Holaus, Veit, Ludwig Rainer, and Kleir. Their performances commenced on the 28th ult. at the St. James’s Theatre, under the patronage of the Duchess of Somerset. The Tyrolese Minstrels have sung at Windsor Castle and Frogmore House, in the presence of her Majesty, Prince Albert, and the Duchess of Kent; and recently at the Pavilion, Brighton, before the Duchess of Gloucester. Testimonials of the Master and Comptroller of the Royal Households, expressive of the gratification of the Queen, Prince Albert, and the Duchess of Kent, have been granted to the singers, and they are also bearers of testimonials from the Emperors of Russia and Austria, the Kings of Bavaria, Saxony, and Wirtemberg, the Duke of Saxe-Coburg, &c. Nothing can be more picturesque than the costumes of the Tyrolese Minstrels, and nothing can be more curious and original than the harmonised melodies which they interpret; amateurs who are curious in studying musical nationalities, will find suggestive matter in listening to the music of the Tyrol.
‘This singing troupe are natives of the valley of Tullerthal; they came to England to see the Great Exhibition. Two of this company belong to the Rifleman corps of the Tyrol, and are decorated with silver medals from the Emperor of Austria. The bass singer, Herr Holaus, has travelled with the celebrated Rainer family through the United States of America, where they have met with the greatest success. M. Rainer, the son of the celebrated Rainer family, is in possession of a Tyrolean belt presented from George IV. to his father. The belt has in front the Royal arms, and is of the most handsome workmanship.’
(The Illustrated London News, London, Saturday, 6 December 1851, p. 669)

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