Archive for January, 2013

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Funny Fred Hall, English clown and comedian

January 24, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Funny Fred Hall (Frederick Tudor Hall, 1857-1898),
English clown and comedian
(photo: Taney & Co, Foreshore Road, Scarborough, and
Prince of Wales Road, Norwich, England, circa 1885)

Boston, Lincolnshire, England
‘CORN EXCHANGE STOODLEY’S CIRQUE. – The Corn Exchange continues to be well fitted nightly, a very good programme having been provided this week. A Night in Pekin is very creditably put on. The horsemanship of Miss and Mr C.W. Stoodley and the Clown business of Funny Fred. Hall evoke merited applause. The notable additions to the company are Henry Brown (jester), and Mdlle. Zara and Libra Adela (equilibrists).’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 2 March 1879, p. 8a)

‘MR. STOODLEY’S CIRCUS. – This source of public amusement, which comprises such an able and talented company, has been largely patronized during the present week. On Tuesday evening a performances was given under the patronage of the Mayor (A.F. Nicholson, Esq.) and other influential gentlemen, there being a full house. Cee-Mee [tightrope walker] continues his ariel performance at an altitude of 40 feet with a great Alpine leap of 25 feet through a fire balloon to a stationery trapeze. This certainly is a most wonderful feat, and is watched by the audience in breathless silence. The horseback riding is excellent, as are also the performances on the bar and flying rings. As regards the clowns, John J. Cooke and Funny Fred Hall still maintain the reputation they acquired here whilst the circus was staying at Ipswich some time back. Abe Daniels, the musical clown, is well worth seeing, he being a complete master of the violin, as he is also of the banjo.’
(The Ipswich Journal, Ipswich, England, Saturday, 12 April 1879, p. 5c)

Frederick Tudor Hall was married in 1881 at St. Saviour, Southwark, to Julia Lucretia Butler.

‘DIED, April 17th, at Liverpool, Henry Tudor Hall, the beloved brother of William Tudor and Funny Fred Hall, age forty-six years. Interred at Everton Cemetery. American papers please copy.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 30 April 1887, p. 7c)

‘IN MEMORIAM.
‘HALL. – In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Frederick Tudor Hall (Funny Fred Hall), who departed from this life, Aug. 28th, 1898. Never forgotten by his loving wife.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 26 August 1899, p. 14d)

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January 24, 2013

the troupe of Japanese actors who toured England in 1905
in the Japanese drama, Ossode; or, The Geisha’s Revenge
(photo: Debenham, London, 1905)

‘The Company have [sic] been playing Ossode in Japanese, and, despite their ability, have met with comparatively little success. As a result, they have been left almost penniless at York, but they intend to reorganise their affairs and make a fresh start.’
(The Sketch, London, Wednesday, 23 August 1905, p.198)

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January 24, 2013

Nellie Lonnen (Ellen Farren Lonnen/Mrs Cecil James Coade [1912], 1887-1968),
English actress and singer
(photo: Johnston & Hoffmann, London, 1905)

‘Nellie Lonnen, the latest recruit to the Gaiety Company, is a daughter of the late Mr. E.J. Lonnen. Although she is still well within her teens, she has already won some success on the variety stage – on which she appeared with her sister [Jessie] – and she played in The Cherry Girl [musical play, Vaudeville Theatre, London, 21 December 1903]. She is godchild of the late Nellie Farren.’
(The Sketch, London, Wednesday, 16 August 1905, p.171)

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Nellie Lonnen, English actress and singer

January 24, 2013

Nellie Lonnen (Ellen Farren Lonnen/Mrs Cecil James Coade [1912], 1887-1968),
English actress and singer
(photo: Johnston & Hoffmann, London, 1905)

‘Nellie Lonnen, the latest recruit to the Gaiety Company, is a daughter of the late Mr. E.J. Lonnen. Although she is still well within her teens, she has already won some success on the variety stage – on which she appeared with her sister [Jessie] – and she played in The Cherry Girl [musical play, Vaudeville Theatre, London, 21 December 1903]. She is godchild of the late Nellie Farren.’
(The Sketch, London, Wednesday, 16 August 1905, p.171)

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‘My Girlie Girl’ : Rose Beaumont, American actress and singer

January 24, 2013

Rose Beaumont (fl. early 20th Century),
American actress and singer,
as Gloriana Bird on the song sheet cover of ‘My Girlie Girl,’
words by Felix F. Feist and music by Ted S. Barron,
as sung in the musical comedy The Errand Boy,
produced prior to a tour of the United States
at Haverly’s 14th Street Theatre, New York, 31 October 1904
(photo: unknown, probably New York, 1904;
published by Leo Fiest, New York, 1904)

Billy B. Van in The Errand Boy at the Lafayette Theatre, Washington, D.C., October, 1905
‘In choosing Billy B. Van to head the pretentious organization of comedians, vocalists, and dancers in The Errand Boy the management confesses to a disposition to honor an artist in the character which has served him faithfully in other comedy plays, realizing that the unctuous antics of Patsy Bolivar are well suited to a more pretentious offering. According to reliable reports, there must have been no little difficulty encountered in selecting the bevy of feminine loveliness which participates in the purpose of The Errand Boy, a new comedy elixir, which comes to the Lafayette to-morrow evening for the week. In connection with the principal artists engaged in rendering a plot of mischievous hilarity for perfect understanding, and who, at the same time, lend zest and novelty to the action, Miss Rose Beaumont, whose fame as one of the Beaumont sisters [her sister was Nellie Beaumont], for several seasons a feature with the great Weber & Fields cast, rests secure. She appears as Gloriana Bird, and one of the special musical number “Gloriana,” named for the character, is said to be among the most interesting specimens of her charmingly attractive methods.
‘Florence Sweetman, Edith Hart, Florence Brooks, Frank Evans, Abbott Davidson, Charlie Saxon, Clement Bevins, and others, in conjunction with a powerful chorus, assist in the musical comedy, which is claimed to be something of an innovation. The Errand Boy is a spectacular musical comedy extravaganza, with a unique plot and many tuneful numbers by composers of note, and should prove acceptable to those who delight in light musical entertainment. In how far they have succeeded in departing from beaten paths is denoted by the inspiring press reports, all of which make special observation concerning the funnyisms of Billy B. Van, who leads this company of singers and dancers.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 8 October 1905, Third Part, p.5b)

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January 23, 2013

La Goulue, “the glutton,” (née Louise Weber, 1870-1929)
Parisian can-can dancer and celebrity
(photo: unknown, probably Paris, circa 1890)

The Moulin Rouge, Paris, to be transformed into a regular music hall; news of La Goulue and other former dancers there, January 1903
‘It is now proposed to transform the notorious Moulin Rouge, at Montmartre, Paris, into an ordinary music hall or something of the kind. The dancing, or “quadrille naturaliste” [i.e. the can-can], as it was termed, has been declining in popularity since the departures of such notes danseuses as La Goulue, Grille d’Egout, Nini Patte en l’Air, and Valentine. Valentine, or, rather Valentine le Desossé [sic], is now the owner of a large livery stable with a number of horses, while La Goulue is in the lion-taming line and keeps a menagerie. Others of the former dancers of the Moulin Rouge have died, or have wearied and settled down as steady family people.’
(The New York Times, New York, Monday, 26 January 1903, p.10e)

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La Goulue, Parisian can-can dancer

January 23, 2013

La Goulue, “the glutton,” (née Louise Weber, 1870-1929)
Parisian can-can dancer and celebrity
(photo: unknown, probably Paris, circa 1890)

The Moulin Rouge, Paris, to be transformed into a regular music hall; news of La Goulue and other former dancers there, January 1903
‘It is now proposed to transform the notorious Moulin Rouge, at Montmartre, Paris, into an ordinary music hall or something of the kind. The dancing, or “quadrille naturaliste” [i.e. the can-can], as it was termed, has been declining in popularity since the departures of such notes danseuses as La Goulue, Grille d’Egout, Nini Patte en l’Air, and Valentine. Valentine, or, rather Valentine le Desossé [sic], is now the owner of a large livery stable with a number of horses, while La Goulue is in the lion-taming line and keeps a menagerie. Others of the former dancers of the Moulin Rouge have died, or have wearied and settled down as steady family people.’
(The New York Times, New York, Monday, 26 January 1903, p.10e)