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Dan Agar

February 24, 2013

a postcard photograph of Dan Agar (1881-1950), English character actor and comedian,
who found fame in 1919 in Australia
(photo: Relph & Co, Preston, England, circa 1918)

Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Saturday, 20 December 1919
‘MORE BING BOYS.
‘It is but twenty months since The Bing Boys Are Here closed a run of 114 performances at Her Majesty’s Theatre, and now The Bing Boys on Broadway shows the same two cousins, the fool and the knave, once more amusing Sydney audiences as the central figures of a scattered and loosely-jointed entertainments… . Jennie Hartley made the hit of the evening as Emma, a character not much changed from the impudent husey [sic] of two years ago… . Dan Agar was the principal comedian as Lucifer Bing, a quaint and impossible apparition with arched eyebrows, well in contrast with Gus Bluett as Potifer Bing… . Mr Agar’s humour is not very spontaneous, but in the familiar ”The Fact Is” he proved at home, and, warming to his work, captured the house in the topical duet, ”Day After Day,” with his always neat articulation. Miss Hartley joined him in an extra verse in praise of Ross Smith, a tough which delighted everybody and lead to further encores… .’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NWS, Australia, Monday, 22 December 1919, p. 5f)

The Bing Boys on Broadway was originally produced in London at the Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, on 16 February 1918, in succession to similar shows, respectively titled The Bing Boys are Here (19 April 1916) and The Bing Girls are There (24 February 1917).

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