Archive for February, 2013

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Evie Greene

February 27, 2013

Evie Greene (1876-1917),
English actress and singer,
as principal boy in the pantomime
Babes in the Wood and Robin Hood,
produced at the Tyne Theatre, Newcastle-on-Tyne, Christmas, 1897
(photo: unknown, 1897/98)

This real photograph cigarette card of Evie Greene as principal boy in the Christmas 1897 pantomime Babes in the Wood and Robin Hood, produced at the Tyne Theatre, Newcastle-on-Tyne, was issued about 1900 in England in one of Ogden’s Guinea Gold series. Other members of the cast included Maggie Duggan, Marie Yorke, May Marton, Nellie Christie, Lulu and Valli Valli, Robb Harwood, Harry Elliston, Harry Lupino, Charles Cassie (eccentric doll dance), Volti and Ray (bar act) and the Harlow Brothers (The Newcastle Weekly Courant, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Saturday, 1 January 1898, p. 1b)

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Teddie Gerard sings ‘Hawaiian Butterfly’

February 26, 2013

song sheet cover for the song ‘Hawaiian Butterfly,’
lyrics by George A. Little and music by Billy Baskette and Joseph Santly,
sung by Teddie Gerard in Andre Charlot’s successful ‘musical entertainment,’ Bubbly,
produced at the Comedy Theatre, London, on 5 May 1917
(photos: left, Malcolm Arbuthnot; right, Wrather & Buys, London, 1917)

Miss Gerard, accompanied by a chorus and the Comedy Theatre Orchestra conducted by Philip Braham, recorded ‘Hawaiian Butterfly’ for the Columbia label (L-1188) in London during May 1917.

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Carlton Sisters

February 26, 2013

a cabinet photograph of the Carlton Sisters (fl. late 1880s/early 1890s),
American duettists and dancers
(photo: unknown, USA, circa 1880)

‘At Doris’s big Eighth Avenue Museum the attractions next week will be Barney Baldwin, the man with the broken neck; George Williams, the turtle boy; Capt. Wesley Baum and sister, South American tattooed people. Frank Brown and sisters, albinos, and Mr. and Miss Sage. On the stage the Goff Comedy Company will give hourly entertainments, and among those to appear are Billy Clayton, John P. Curley, the Carlton sisters, Eugene Ward, a footless dancer, and Dora and Frank Goff, who will present The Lightning Porter.
(The Evening World, New York, New York, 8 November 1890, p. 3b)

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Elsie Prince

February 26, 2013

Elsie Prince (1902-1988),
English actress and singer
featured on the cover of the Sunday Herald Pantomime Annual, 1920-21,
when she appeared in the title role of the pantomime
Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, produced at the London Hippodrome, 21 December 1920
Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp, a pantomime written by Lauri Wyle and F. Maxwell-Stewart, with lyrics by Clifford Harris, ‘Valentine’ and Donovan Parsons, and music composed, selected and arranged by James W. Tate, with music under the direction of Julian Jones, was produced at the London Hippodrome for the Christmas season of 1920. The leading parts were played by Lupino Lane (Pekoe), Nellie Wallace (The Widow Twankey), Elsie Prince (Aladdin), and Phyllis Dare (Princess Badr-al-budur). Miss Dare’s part was played at matinees by Gertrude Lawrence. Special features of the pantomime included The Curtain of Diamonds in Scene 6 (‘The Garden of Jewels’), composed of 100,000 glass lustres and six miles of wire; the ‘Squelch’ wringing machine in Scene 7 (‘Widow Twankey’s Laundry’), invented by David Devant; the Picture-Blocks in Scene 10 (‘Courtyard of Aladdin’s Magical Palace’), designed by H.M. Bateman; and Lupino Lane’s old-fashioned Star-Trap Act in Scene 12 (‘The Great Wall of Pekin’), in which he performed 74 traps in six minutes.

Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp closed after 184 performances on 10 April 1921.

Elsie Prince
an autographed photograph of Elsie Prince
(photo: unknown, probably Australia, late 1920s)

‘MISS ELSIE PRINCE.
‘English Actress Arrives.
‘Miss Elsie Prince, the vivacious young English artist, who became immediately popular in Melbourne by her performance in the leading role of No, No, Nanette, arrived in Sydney yesterday, and in this way forms the advance guard of the company in its Sydney season, which is to begin next month in brilliant circumstances, since No, No, Nanette has been chosen for the opening of the new St. James’s Theatre. This musical comedy, in its Melbourne run, emulated its London success, for crowded houses were the rule, Miss Prince, in the role of Nanette, had a material share in the prestige thus won for the piece in Australia. The new artist gained prominence early in her stage career, as she was only 17 when she was engaged five years ago as principal boy in the Wylie-Tate production of Aladdin at the London Hippodrome, in a cast which also included Miss Phyllis Dare as principal girl. Miss Prince has had considerable experience in important engagements in pantomime and other pieces in the English provinces; and returned to London recently to the Hippodrome for another of its successes. Brighter London [produced, 23 March 1923], in which she was playing a leading part when engaged by Mr. Hugh Ward for her present tour of Australia. Miss Prince, who from her experience of Australia, has grown to love this country, is eagerly looking forward to her meeting with Sydney audiences. Misses Kitty and Edna Prince, her sisters, are on the stage, and are now fulfilling engagements at the Princess Theatre, Glasgow, in the pantomime, Hankey Panky.’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Wednesday, 17 February 1926, p. 6c)

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February 25, 2013

Lottie Medley (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American actress, singer and dancer
(photo: unknown, USA, late 1890s)

This real photograph cigarette card of Lottie Medley was issued in England about 1900 in one of Ogden’s Guinea Gold series.

‘To Miss Lottie Medley has been assigned the important role of Jeanette Durling in The Runaways at the Casino. She succeeds Miss Mabel Carrier [who] by reason of the continued illness of Miss Helen Lord has been promoted to the task of playing Dorothy Hardtack. Miss Medley, who is not only a good singer, but a talented actress in comedy roles, also becomes the understudy of Miss Fay Templeton in the leading role of the performance.’
(The Trenton Times, Trenton, New Jersey, Tuesday, 28 July 1903, p.2a)

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Lottie Medley

February 25, 2013

Lottie Medley (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American actress, singer and dancer
(photo: unknown, USA, late 1890s)

This real photograph cigarette card of Lottie Medley was issued in England about 1900 in one of Ogden’s Guinea Gold series.

‘To Miss Lottie Medley has been assigned the important role of Jeanette Durling in The Runaways at the Casino. She succeeds Miss Mabel Carrier [who] by reason of the continued illness of Miss Helen Lord has been promoted to the task of playing Dorothy Hardtack. Miss Medley, who is not only a good singer, but a talented actress in comedy roles, also becomes the understudy of Miss Fay Templeton in the leading role of the performance.’
(The Trenton Times, Trenton, New Jersey, Tuesday, 28 July 1903, p.2a)

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Ellen Pelly

February 24, 2013

a carte de visit photograph of Ellen Pelly (otherwise Pelley, 1853-1873), English ballet dancer,
who died as a result of her costume catching fire on
Saturday, 27 September 1873, at the Alhambra, Leicester Square,
during a performance of the ballet, The Enchanted Forest, principal dancer Giovannina Pitteri
(photo: Truckle & Brisco, New Bond Street, London, circa 1873)

‘FATAL OCCURENCE AT THE ALHAMBRA. – Late on Thursday night a poor girl named Ellen Pelly died at the Charing-cross hospital from injuries received by fire on the previous Saturday evening at the Alhambra theatre. It appears that during the performance of the grand ballet the deceased was about to ascent in the irons when the skirts of her dress ignited. With piercing shrieks she attempted to rush on the stage, which at the time was crowded with dancers, all wearing light dresses of the most inflammable material. Fortunately for them she was withheld by one of the gasmen, who rolled his coat round her and smothered the flames. The sufferer was conveyed in great agony to the above-named hospital, where she received prompt attention. But the shock to the system was so great that she gradually sank until death ended her sufferings.’
(Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper, London, Sunday, 5 October 1873, p. 7d)

‘An inquest was held yesterday [6 October 1873] at the Charing-cross Hospital on the body of Ellen Pelly, aged twenty, who had died from the injuries she received through burning at the Alhambra [Leicester Square, London,] on the night of Saturday, the 27th ult. The deceased was a ballet dancer, and on the night in question, when she was preparing to go on the stage as usual in the transformation scene, her dress caught fire. William Rogers, the gasman at the Alhambra, said that the deceased was behind her time, and hence the accident. It was a rule that all the girls should be in their places before the gas was lighted. The stage manager also stated that the poor girl had no right to be near the light from which her dress became ignited. She went on the stage on the wrong side. There were two wet blankets that night available for extinguishing fire. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death, adding a recommendation to the management of the Alhambra Theatre to provide a greater number of blankets for use in case of accidents.’
(The Pall Mall Gazette, London, Tuesday, 7 October 1873, p. 4b)