Posts Tagged ‘A.R. MacWilliams (photographer)’

h1

The Great Blind Bartell, the naval Crimean hero, English vocalist and composer

July 19, 2014

C.H. Bartell (active late 1860s-1898), English blind vocalist and composer, sometimes billed as ‘The Great Blind Bartell’ and the ‘naval Crimean hero, with his flag entertainment’
(carte de visite photo: A.R. MacWilliams, 16 South Hanover Street, Glasgow, circa 1875)
Bartell, whose real name was Charles Henry Huntley, was born in London on 14 July 1835, the son of Henry Huntley, a brewer (later licensed victualler) and his wife, Elizabeth, and baptized at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green on 28 June 1837. He joined the navy at an early age but was blinded in an accident during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Twice married and father to a number of children, he died at home on 7 Sept 1901 at 18 Dudley Road, Sale, Cheshire.

The Middlesex music hall, Edgware Road, London, week beginning Monday, 30 December 1867
‘Mr. Bartell, a blind vocalist, sang several songs, the words of which are written by himself. One of these effusions related to ”What we want to know.” Another, which he called ”The Flags of all Nations,” glances at prominent tropics connected with different European states, and in a third Mr. Bartell recapitulated the achievements of 1867, and concluded by reciting some lines composed by himself, in which he described how he lost his sight when he was present as a sailor at the taking of Sebastopol. He has a powerful voice, and sings very forcibly. The audience heartily cheered him.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 5 January 1868, p. 6d)

Alhambra music hall, Worcester, week beginning Monday, 11 January 1869
‘Mr. C.H. Bartell, the blind descriptive vocalist and author, from the Crystal Palace, London, whose great international song, ”The Flags of All Nations,” has been received with much applause. Mr Bartell is one of the Crimean heroes, and he recites some verses relating to that dreadful contest, in which he gives an account of his life, and touchingly alludes to the loss of his sight.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 17 January 1869, p. 13d)

People’s Concert Hall, Stockport, Cheshire, week beginning Monday, 4 March 1872
‘We have this week to report the great success of the De Castro Troupe (gymnast and acrobats); also Le Petit Tom and Young England in their daring performance on the high trapeze. Mr. C.H. Hartell (blind descriptive vocalist) sings several songs of his own composing in a manner which elicits frequent applause. Mr. H. Beresford (comic), and Miss Bartell (serio-comic and dancer), with Mr and Mrs J. Whittingham (Negroists), complete the company.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 10 March 1872, p. 7b)

‘Charles Huntley Bartell, a Crimean veteran, who lost his sight in action, has died at his home in Sale, Manchester. ”Blind Bartell,” as he was known, gained quite a local reputation as a vocalist and entertainer, and some of his verses so impressed Queen Victoria that she made him a money grant. He was the oldest naval pensioner in Manchester, and possessed medals for Alma, Sebastopol and Inkerman. When Lord Roberts last visited Manchester he responded at the dinner given on behalf of the naval section of the Crimean veterans.’
(The Teedsale Mercury, Barnard Castle, Wednesday, 18 September 1901, p. 6f)

h1

July 19, 2014

C.H. Bartell (active late 1860s-1898), English blind vocalist and composer, sometimes billed as ‘The Great Blind Bartell’ and the ‘naval Crimean hero, with his flag entertainment’
(carte de visite photo: A.R. MacWilliams, 16 South Hanover Street, Glasgow, circa 1875)
Bartell, whose real name was Charles Henry Huntley, was born in London on 14 July 1835, the son of Henry Huntley, a brewer (later licensed victualler) and his wife, Elizabeth, and baptized at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green on 28 June 1837. He joined the navy at an early age but was blinded in an accident during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Twice married and father to a number of children, he died at home on 7 Sept 1901 at 18 Dudley Road, Sale, Cheshire.

The Middlesex music hall, Edgware Road, London, week beginning Monday, 30 December 1867
‘Mr. Bartell, a blind vocalist, sang several songs, the words of which are written by himself. One of these effusions related to “What we want to know.” Another, which he called “The Flags of all Nations,” glances at prominent tropics connected with different European states, and in a third Mr. Bartell recapitulated the achievements of 1867, and concluded by reciting some lines composed by himself, in which he described how he lost his sight when he was present as a sailor at the taking of Sebastopol. He has a powerful voice, and sings very forcibly. The audience heartily cheered him.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 5 January 1868, p. 6d)

Alhambra music hall, Worcester, week beginning Monday, 11 January 1869
‘Mr. C.H. Bartell, the blind descriptive vocalist and author, from the Crystal Palace, London, whose great international song, “The Flags of All Nations,” has been received with much applause. Mr Bartell is one of the Crimean heroes, and he recites some verses relating to that dreadful contest, in which he gives an account of his life, and touchingly alludes to the loss of his sight.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 17 January 1869, p. 13d)

People’s Concert Hall, Stockport, Cheshire, week beginning Monday, 4 March 1872
‘We have this week to report the great success of the De Castro Troupe (gymnast and acrobats); also Le Petit Tom and Young England in their daring performance on the high trapeze. Mr. C.H. Hartell (blind descriptive vocalist) sings several songs of his own composing in a manner which elicits frequent applause. Mr. H. Beresford (comic), and Miss Bartell (serio-comic and dancer), with Mr and Mrs J. Whittingham (Negroists), complete the company.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 10 March 1872, p. 7b)

‘Charles Huntley Bartell, a Crimean veteran, who lost his sight in action, has died at his home in Sale, Manchester. “Blind Bartell,” as he was known, gained quite a local reputation as a vocalist and entertainer, and some of his verses so impressed Queen Victoria that she made him a money grant. He was the oldest naval pensioner in Manchester, and possessed medals for Alma, Sebastopol and Inkerman. When Lord Roberts last visited Manchester he responded at the dinner given on behalf of the naval section of the Crimean veterans.’
(The Teedsale Mercury, Barnard Castle, Wednesday, 18 September 1901, p. 6f)

h1

Mdlle. Cerito

March 22, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Mdlle. Cerito (fl. late 1860s), English transformation dancer, not to be confused with Fanny Cerrito (1817-1909)
(photo: A.R. MacWilliams, Glasgow, late 1860s)

‘Mdlle. Cerito will shortly appear in London, being engaged to give her new transformation dance of all nations. Mdlle. Cerito has a magnificent wardrobe by Setrim of Paris.’
(The Music Halls’s Gazette, London, Saturday, 30 May 1868, p. 61b)

‘Cerito! Cerito!! Cerito!!!
The Greatest Premiere Characteristique de Transformation Danseuse in Europe, has just returned from Paris, Rouen, &c. Will commence her Tour in England on Monday next. At Liberty September 28th, for Three Weeks only. Returns to Paris February 25th, 1869, for Eight Weeks. Address, Jones Hellawell, Argyle Rooms, Huddersfield.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 14 June 1868, p.1b, advertisement)

‘… Mdlle. Cerito’s Transformation Dance, including Twelve Rapid and Marvellous Changes of Costume, excels anything of the kind ever offered to the public… .’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 28 June 1868, p. 1d, advertisement)

* * * * * * * *

‘Patti Rosa Dead.
‘NEW YORK, Aug 6. Patti Rosa, a well known soubrette, died at St. Francis hospital from the affects of an operation performed for appendicitis. She was the wife of [the actor manager] John W. Dunne.’ (The Trenton Times, 6 August 1894, p. 8b)

‘Patti Rosa Dies in New York.
‘NEW YORK, Aug. 6. – Patti Rosa, a well-known soubrette, died Sunday. She was the wife of John W. Dunne, who will leave with the remains for Chicago, where the funeral will take place on Thursday next.’
(The Ohio Democrat, New Philadelphia, Ohio, Thursday, 16 August 1894, p. 7c)

‘Death. – Patti Rosa (Mrs. John W. Dunne), on august 5, at St. Frances’ Hospital, New York, aged thirty. Deceased was a native of England, and daughter of Madame Cerito, the transformation dancer.’ (The Music Hall and Theatre Review, London, Friday, 17 August 1894, p. 9b)

‘The Lyman Twins.
‘It is announced that the famous twin comedians, The Lyman Twin Brothers, will appear at the Grand [i.e. the Grand Opera House, Stevens Point, Wisconsin] next Saturday evening, May 13 [1911], in The Prize Winners, in their latest and greatest musical comedy success. This excellent company with its beautiful scenic equipment, numerous wonderful mechanical and electrical effects, together with one of the strongest casts today in musical comedy, comprising a pretty chorus, wonderful dancers and clever comedians producing original novelties, will give one of the most pleasing entertainments of the season. The costuming is superb, and together with the dazzling effects used in the numerous specialities, including the poppy girl dance, the country maidens, and the charming daisy girls, you are sure to an ovation seldom seen here.
”’Like father, like son,” is a familiar quotation of ancient lineage, but it is not often that one hears of three generations of female line following the same profession. This unusual occurrence is happily illustrated in the case of Patti Louisa Rosa, leading support with the Lyman Twins this season. Miss Patti Louisa Rosa should have a natural equipment for stage work, as both her mother and grandmother were footlight favorites of more than ordinary degree. The young lady is a daughter of the Jolly Patti Rosa, remembered with much affection by the majority of amusement loving public, and Patti Rosa was the daughter of Madame Cerito, a famous figure on the Italian stage in the last generation. Skill in dancing was a great gift in common with all three of the family.’
(The Gazette, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Wednesday, 10 May 1911, p. 1d)

h1

Lizzie Lisette, English music hall serio-comic vocalist and dancer

January 3, 2013

Lizzie Lisette (otherwise Lizzette, fl. late 1860s/early 1870s), ‘Dances and sings,’ English music hall serio-comic vocalist and dancer (photo: A.R. MacWilliams, Glasgow, circa 1870)

‘MUSEUM CONCERT HALL, Bull Ring. [Birmingham] Proprietor, Mr. G. BIBEE. – THIS PRESENT EVENING (Tuesday), March 14 [1870], and during the week. First Appearance of Miss LIZZIE LISETTE, Serio-comic Vocalist, and Mr. HARRY WARD, Comic Vocalist. Continued Success of the following Artistes: – Mons. SYLVESTRE, the Great Contortionist; Mr. GEO. WASHINGTON, Negro Comedian; Mr. WYNDHAM CLARK, Tenor, Vocalist; Mrs. WARREN, Serio-comic; Miss EMILY WARREN, Character Vocalist and Dancer; and the BROTHERS SUTHERLAND, on the Flying Rings. Doors open at Seven; commence at Half-past.’ (The Birmingham Daily Post, Birmingham, Tuesday, 15 March 1870, p. 1a, advertisement)

‘THE MUSEUM CONCERT HALL continues to attract a large number of patrons. The company of artists is, if anything, stronger than usual, and as a result the programme has shown considerable variety. The principal performers have been Miss Lizzie Lisette and Mr. Harry Ward, in the comic line; Mr. W. Clark, tenor, in the sentimental; M. Sylvestre and the Brothers Sunderland, in the gymnastic; and Mr. G. Washington, in the negro line.’ (The Birmingham Daily Post, Birmingham, Saturday, 19 Marcy 1870, p. 6d)