Posts Tagged ‘ballet’

h1

programme cover for the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, in its 25th Anniversary year, 1912

November 23, 2014

Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, ‘The Premier Variety Theatre. The Cosmopolitan Club and The Rendezvous of the World,’ 25th Anniversary programme cover, featuring the titles of a few of the ballets produced and the names of ballerinas to have appeared there between 1887 and 1912
(artwork by C. Wilhelm [William John Charles Pitcher (1858-1925)], English artist, costume designer and choreographer; printed by Henry Good & Son, London, EC, 1912)

h1

Ernesto Mascagno

April 7, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Ernesto Mascagno (fl. 1870s/1880s), Italian dancer and ballet master
(photo: Carlo Fratacci, Naples, late 1870s)

Ernesto Mascagno created a strong impression by his dancing on New York audiences when in August 1876 he appeared at Booth’s Theatre in Sardanapalus, an extravaganza based on Byron’s drama, starring F.C. Bangs as the King, Dora Goldthwaite as Zarina, and Agnes Booth as Myrrha, the Ionian slave. On this occasion Mascagno was supported in a grand ballet by Mlle. Bartoletti, twenty-four ‘Negro boys’ and forty-eight ‘extra ladies.’ Early in 1877 he is reported to have joined the ballet in another extravaganza, Around the World at Niblo’s Theatre, New York.

h1

programme cover for R.S.V.P., Vaudeville Theatre, London, 1926

April 6, 2013

programme cover for Archibald de Bear’s revue, R.S.V.P., produced at the Vaudeville Theatre, London, on 23 February 1926
(printed by Henry Good & Son Ltd, London, 1926)

The revue R.S.V.P., including Alice in Lumberland, ‘a fantasy in three phases,’ written by Archibald de Bear, with ballet and incidental music by Norman O’Neill, with additional scenes and lyrics by Reginald Arkell, was produced at the Vaudeville Theatre, London, on 23 February 1926. With dances arranged by J.W. Jackson and the ballet choreographed by Quentin Tod, with settings, costumes, &c by Clifford Pember, the piece included a cast headed by Robert Hale, J.H. Roberts, Quentin Tod, Joyce Barbour, Mimi Crawford and Enid Stamp-Taylor. The number of performances is uncertain because of the General Strike, but is thought to be in the region of 294, closing on 6 November 1926.

R.S.V.P.

Mimi Crawford, Joyce Barbour and Enid Stamp-Taylor as they appeared in R.S.V.P., Vaudeville Theatre, London, 23 February 1926
(photo: probably Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1926)

h1

April 6, 2013

a stereoscopic photograph of Augusta Sohlke (née Nina Sohlke Schivel, fl. 1860s-1890s), German-born American ballet dancer and choreographer
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, circa 1867)

h1

Augusta Sohlke

April 6, 2013

a stereoscopic photograph of Augusta Sohlke (née Nina Sohlke Schivel, fl. 1860s-1890s), German-born American ballet dancer and choreographer
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, circa 1867)

h1

Augusta Sohlke, German-born American ballet dancer and choreographer, in London, circa 1867

April 6, 2013

a stereoscopic photograph of Augusta Sohlke (née Nina Sohlke Schivel, fl. 1860s-1890s), German-born American ballet dancer and choreographer
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, circa 1867)

h1

Sisters Cruvelli

March 20, 2013

a carte de visite of the three Sisters Cruvelli
(photo: unknown, probably mid/late 1870s)

‘WANTED, BALLET LADIES (must be Good Dancers and Figures) for the Sisters Cruvelli’s Ballet Troupe. Constant and comfortable engagement all the year round to competent Ladies. Cartes-de-visite returned if desired.
‘Address, New Star Music Hall, Leith, Edinburgh.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 27 September 1874, p 15c, advertisement)

‘DERBY. CORN EXCHANGE. – Messrs Coleman and Whiteside (good Negro comedians) head the bill this week. Mr and Mrs Frank Harold (duettists) have been re-engaged. The Sisters Cruvelli (danseuses) are successful. De Vanu is a daring gymnast. Business good.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 12 August 1877, p. 6b)

Dundee.
‘OPERETTA HOUSE. – The new arrivals here are Ada French, Louie Denton, Messrs Henry and Barron, Miss Essie Braddon, the Sisters Adele, Laura and Florence Cruvelli, and Mr Will Briscoe. The Picardo Picanninies are still here.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 25 November 1877, p. 7c)

Edinburgh.
‘THE GAIETY. – Manager, Mr G.J. Cruvelli. – Mr. Bostock, one of the cleverest comic singers we have ever had here, and now one of the greatest favourites with the patrons of this house, reappeared on Monday with his usual success. The Sister Cruvelli, operatic dancers, have also been engaged, and have been well received during the week in a selection of brilliantly executed evolutions.’
(The Era, Sunday, 9 December 1877, p. 7d)

‘EMM AMONG THE ZULUS. – This evening’s representation of Emm’s Adventures among the Zulus will being the successful spectacle to a close, as the popular comedian is announced to appear in Swansea on Thursday night. The Zulu extravaganza is certainly very amusing, and Mr. Emm has nightly elicited shouts of laughter at his surprising exploits among the dusky warriors, and his various narrow escapes have been productive of much merriment. A large number of artistes take part in the representation, and some of the ”makes up” are admirable. Several local hits tell immensely, and those who have not see Emm among the Zulus cannot do better than arrange a visit for this evening. The three Sisters Cruvelli nightly appear in a series of ballet divertisements, and the dramatic portion of this evening’s entertainment will be the French romantic drama Cartouche, played in four acts of great interest, in which Messrs. Murray, Emm, and the capital company with appear.’
(The Western Mail, Cardiff, Wales, Wednesday, 11 June 1879, p. 4d)

h1

Lizzie Tabra

March 18, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Lizzie Tabra (fl. late 1870s/early 1880s), English serio-comic, sometime in partnership with Gus Levaine, vocal and instrumental duettists
(photo: unknown, circa 1880)

South London Palace music hall, London
‘After an absence extending over two years Mr Fred Evans has again returned to the scene of his former triumphs, and with his world-famous ballet troupe has contributed not a little to the enjoyment of the habitués of the above-mentioned transpontine place of entertainment. What name he gives to the extraordinary ballet in which he appears we are not in position to say, but this we can with truthfulness assert, that from beginning to end it proves provocative of laughter of the most uproarious character. Mr Evans himself appears as a droll fellow, dressed in all sorts of colours, and prepared to make love, to turn his congrères, or to leap through windows at half a moment’s notice. His humour is only surpassed by his agility, and the thunders of applause which greet him afford eloquent testimony that his doings are keenly appreciated. Miss Amy Rosalind, looking as bright and dancing as blithely as ever, is the damsel of the sketch, and well does she play her part. Mr Harry Wright personates an amorous Quaker, who comes in for no small share of Mr Evans’s thwacks, and takes his punishment with the best possible grace. Mr Loraine represent a love-making soldier, and before the end is reached these two gentlemen find themselves transformed respectively into a chair and a table. Mr Turtle Jones, who seems to enjoy being knocked about, puts in an appearance as a pastrycook, and he presently takes the form of a harp. All these pieces of human furniture suffer from the hot poker wielded by the man in motley. This funny ballet should be seen by all those who love to laugh. The famous Jackley troupe have been re-engaged. They now introduce a new trick, several of the more agile members turning a somersault over the heads of eight or nine people seated in a row. Mr Sam Torr nightly finds a ready chorus for his capitally rendered song called ”The Same Old Game.” The daring flights of those clever little people Lillo and Slspa continue to excite wonder and admiration and to evoke great applause. Mr Tom Warde’s clog dancing is generally admired, and the topical ditties of Mr Tom Vine never fail to call forth expressions of approval. Sivori Poole is still here, and stands in the very front frank of favourites. Mr Pat Feeney’s Irish songs and jigs lend a pleasing variety to the entrainment; Miss Tabra, in serio-comic song, finds hosts of admirers; the Brothers Wills, in their comical sketches, cause much merriment; and a capital company is completed by Cole and Leonie (duettists) and La Petite grace, very properly designated the ”juvenile wonder.”’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 16 April 1876, p. 4d)

h1

‘The Princess’s Rifles,’ 1859

March 15, 2013

a carte de visite photograph (a contemporary copy of a larger print) of ladies of ‘The Princess’s Rifles,’ who appeared in the pantomime Jack the Giant Killer; or, Harlequin King Arthur and Ye Knyghts of Ye Rounde Table, produced by Augustus Harris at the Princess’s Theatre, Oxford Street, London, at Christmas 1859 (photo: Camille Silvy, London, 1859/60;
retailed by Lacy, Theatrical Bookseller, 89 Strand, London, WC)

‘The distinguished corps, ”The Princess’s, Rifles,” whose evolutions have been the subject of such general admiration during the run of the Princess’s pantomime, have made a handsome volunteer offering of a silver cup to Mr. Augustus Harris, as a testimony to the courtesy and kindness he has evinced to the ladies of the ballet since the theatre has been under his management.’
(Reynolds’s Newspaper, London, Sunday, 11 March 1860, p. 5b)

h1

Parisiana, ballet, Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, London, 1905

March 4, 2013

a coloured carbon print postcard published by the Aristophot Co of London (E.558), at the end of 1905 or beginning of 1906, from a photograph of three dancers in a scene from the ballet Parisiana, produced at the Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, London, on 11 December 1905
(photo: Campbell-Gray, London, 1905/06)

Parisiana, a ballet arranged and produced by Charles Wilson as a series of sketches set in Paris from the time of the French Revolution to the early 20th Century, was choreographed by Alfredo Curti to the music of James M. Glover. With a ‘second edition’ being staged on 19 March 1906, Parisiana remained on the Alhambra bill for 61 weeks.