Posts Tagged ‘Ben Greet’

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Ben Greet’s Company on tour in The Casino Girl, 1901

October 10, 2014

Ben Greet’s Company on tour in The Casino Girl at the New Theatre, Cambridge, for three nights beginning Monday, 2 December 1901. The cast was headed by Isa Bowman as Laura Lee and Gabrielle Ray as Dolly Twinkle. Ethel Allandale, as Lotta Rocks, was also in the cast; she later became a member of G.H. Pelissier‘s ‘The Follies.’
(programme printed by Cowell, Ipswich)

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Frank H. Westerton, English actor

March 29, 2014

Frank H. Westerton (1866-1923), English actor
(cabinet photo: William Schuth, 170 Fleet Street, London, E.C., probably 1893)

Francis Henry Westerton was born on 6 April 1866, one of the sons of Samuel John Westerton (1840-1889) and his wife Adelaide (1839-1915, née Adkinson). At first employed as a clerk, he began his successful theatrical career in the late 1880s and was sometime with Ben Greet’s Company. He first went to the United States in 1903, after which he appeared many times on Broadway and in 1914 he appeared as Lescaut in the American film Manon Lescaut, starring Lina Cavalieri in the title role. Meanwhile, in Manhattan on 16 February 1905 he married the American actress, Madge E. McNulty. Westerton died in New York City on 25 August 1923.

Frank H. Westerton Digital ID: th-64544. New York Public Library
(photo: unknown, probably USA, circa 1920; from The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts / Billy Rose Theatre Division)

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Gabrielle Ray

May 2, 2013

Gabrielle Ray (neé Gabrielle Elizabeth Clifford Cook, 1883-1973), English musical comedy actress and dancer
(photo: circa 1902)

Theatre Royal, Brighton, August 1902
‘On Saturday evening we strolled forth, and later dropped in at one of the Promenade Concerts, which appear to be as popular as ever at Brighton. On Monday [3 August 1902], hearing that Polite Lunatic Sullivan was ”showing” here in the Casino Girl, we sought Mr. Cecil Beryl’s Theatre Royal, which seems to hold its own still, and witnessed an excellent performance of the Old Shaftesbury success by one of the Ben Greet companies [managed by Bannister Howard]. Miss Gabrielle Ray proved a wonderful attraction, as might have been expected. ”Gabs” they call her at Brighton, and by Gad! sir, they’re no bad judges either. Our friend, an ardent Yorkshireman, could find no interest in the proceeding when ”Gabs” was out of the picture. But there were others.’
(Judy: The London Serio-Comic Journal, London, Wednesday, 6 August 1902, p. 376a)

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May 2, 2013

Gabrielle Ray (neé Gabrielle Elizabeth Clifford Cook, 1883-1973), English musical comedy actress and dancer
(photo: circa 1902)

Theatre Royal, Brighton, August 1902
‘On Saturday evening we strolled forth, and later dropped in at one of the Promenade Concerts, which appear to be as popular as ever at Brighton. On Monday [3 August 1902], hearing that Polite Lunatic Sullivan was ”showing” here in the Casino Girl, we sought Mr. Cecil Beryl’s Theatre Royal, which seems to hold its own still, and witnessed an excellent performance of the Old Shaftesbury success by one of the Ben Greet companies [managed by Bannister Howard]. Miss Gabrielle Ray proved a wonderful attraction, as might have been expected. ”Gabs” they call her at Brighton, and by Gad! sir, they’re no bad judges either. Our friend, an ardent Yorkshireman, could find no interest in the proceeding when ”Gabs” was out of the picture. But there were others.’
(Judy: The London Serio-Comic Journal, London, Wednesday, 6 August 1902, p. 376a)

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May 2, 2013

Gabrielle Ray (neé Gabrielle Elizabeth Clifford Cook, 1883-1973), English musical comedy actress and dancer
(photo: circa 1902)

Theatre Royal, Brighton, August 1902
‘On Saturday evening we strolled forth, and later dropped in at one of the Promenade Concerts, which appear to be as popular as ever at Brighton. On Monday [3 August 1902], hearing that Polite Lunatic Sullivan was “showing” here in the Casino Girl, we sought Mr. Cecil Beryl’s Theatre Royal, which seems to hold its own still, and witnessed an excellent performance of the Old Shaftesbury success by one of the Ben Greet companies [managed by Bannister Howard]. Miss Gabrielle Ray proved a wonderful attraction, as might have been expected. “Gabs” they call her at Brighton, and by Gad! sir, they’re no bad judges either. Our friend, an ardent Yorkshireman, could find no interest in the proceeding when “Gabs” was out of the picture. But there were others.’
(Judy: The London Serio-Comic Journal, London, Wednesday, 6 August 1902, p. 376a)