Posts Tagged ‘can can’

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Rose Newham

February 16, 2013

Rose Newham (née Rose May Newman, b. 1862),
acrobatic and skirt dancer in characteristic pose.
She was a younger sister of Amelia Newham (née Amelia Augusta Newman, b. 1845), otherwise known as Mlle. Colonna, who had caused a sensation in the late 1860s/early 1870s with her troupe of can can dancers.
(photo: Sarony, New York, late 1880s)

Rose Newham appearing on tour in the United States in Lydia Thompson’s Penelope Company, 1888
‘A VERY SENSATIONAL DANCE.
‘But High Kicking Which Does Not Offend Good Taste.
‘The startling and sensational dance and high kicking of Miss Rose Newham, of the Lydia Thompson Company, in the burlesque of Penelope, which is the opening performance of the company this evening at the New Park theatre, has been the talk of every city in which the dance has been witnessed.
‘Miss Newham kicks and points her toes to the flies, with quite as much ease apparently and quite as perpendicularly as a flagpole pointing its nob [sic] to the heavens. The dance is executed in the costume which was known in the Elizabethan period as a doublet and hose, but which has been considerably modified for the purposes of burlesque.
‘There is nothing at all suggestive in the highest of the high kicking and nothing to offend the most correct taste. The dance is simply graceful, fanciful, eccentric, sensational and entirely startling.
‘It is during the second act that a chord from the orchestra bring the dancer down to the footlights; here she stands for an instant until a measure in the music is reached that suits her, and her feet start into motion. The rapidity of her movements are well nigh inconceivable, and cannot be followed by the eye. Before one position can be flashed to the retina the nimble limbs have cleaved the circumambient air in a wholly different direction. The result is confusing and bewildering in the extreme, and yet not unpleasing. When Miss Newham kicks there is a perpendicular line that flashes from her hip upward past her shoulder, past her shell-like ear, and terminated by a green slipper waving triumphantly above her golden hair. For a moment she looks like a human being with one leg. The other leg has disappeared entirely from the place where it is usually found, and then as the dancing becomes more fast and furious, and it is impossible to follow her movements with any degree of accuracy, she seems to have two limbs on one side of her body – one over her head and the other with the foot still resting on the floor. The optical delusion is complete. The press throughout the country have been loud in their praise of the very remarkable dancing of this young lady; and one and all confess it to be the most graceful and the highest kick ever seen on the stage.
‘Miss Lydia Thompson and her famous burlesque company open this evening in Stephens’ and Solomon’s satirical burlesque Penelope. The company numbers fifty-five people and is the largest and most complete organization ever seen in Portland. The advance sale of seats have been remarkably large, and prospects point to a successful week’s engagement.’
(The Morning Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, Friday, 22 February 1889, p.5b)

Lydia Thompson’s production of Henry Pottinger Stephens and Edward Solomon’s burlesque, Penelope, opened at the Star Theatre, New York, on 15 October 1888, with herself playing Ulysses and Aida Jenoure in the title role.

Rose Newham
Rose Newham
(photo: unknown, late 1880s/early 1890s)

The People’s Theatre, 199 Bowery, New York City, week beginning Monday, 2 February 1891
‘The People’s has reproduced the striking situations and sensational effects of After Dark, a play that appeals very strongly to the tastes of this theatre’s patrons. Edmund Kean Collier, a vigorous and admirable actor when the conditions favor, is now the impersonator of the heroic Old Tom, and the Eaza is that careful and occasionally powerful actress, Stella Rees. Among the vaudevilliers [sic] who appeard in the concert hall scene was Rose Newham, who, though not named on the programme, gave a capital interlude of dancing.’
(The Sun, New York, Thursday, 5 February 1891, p. 3b)

Cinderella, Academy of Music, East 14th Street and Irving Place, New York City, November 1891
‘there was a sort of mortuary jollity about the production of Cinderella at the Academy of Music, a suggestion of the dear, dead ago. As an English pantomime it is a very, very long way off, and as an American entertainment it is lacking in many essential qualities. The costumes, ballets and ballet music all brought back memories of The Babes in the Wood at Niblo’s – to which, by the bye, Cinderella cannot hold a candle – then there was deal of Bertha Ricci, of comic opera memory, and other souvenirs… . Miss Fannie Ward, the Cinderella, has the ghost of a voice… . The best member of the company if Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, who did a conventional pas seul with her best Drury Lane smile.’
(Alan Dale, The Evening World, New York, Wednesday, 25 November 1891, p 2e)

‘Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, will, it is said, star in a new comedy next season, backed by a Chicagoan.’
(Dunkirk Evening Observer, Dunkirk, New York, Tuesday, 10 February 1891, p.2b)

Rose Newham is including in a long list of ‘ACTRESSES – SHOWING BUST’ in ‘New Cabinet Photographs,’ available from ‘RICHARD K. FOX, Publisher, Franklin Square, N.Y.’
(advertisement, <I.>Life and Battles of James J. Corbett The Champion Pugilist of the World, published by Richard K. Fox, New York, 1892)

‘PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
‘Rose Newham
‘At Liberty. 325 West 34th Street.’
(The New York Dramatic Mirror, New York, Saturday, 8 February 1896, p. 27d)

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Rose Newham, acrobatic and skirt dancer, New York City, late 1880s

February 16, 2013

Rose Newham (née Rose May Newman, b. 1862),
acrobatic and skirt dancer in characteristic pose.
She was a younger sister of Amelia Newham (née Amelia Augusta Newman, b. 1845), otherwise known as Mlle. Colonna, who had caused a sensation in the late 1860s/early 1870s with her troupe of can can dancers.
(photo: Sarony, New York, late 1880s)

Rose Newham appearing on tour in the United States in Lydia Thompson’s Penelope Company, 1888
‘A VERY SENSATIONAL DANCE.
‘But High Kicking Which Does Not Offend Good Taste.
‘The startling and sensational dance and high kicking of Miss Rose Newham, of the Lydia Thompson Company, in the burlesque of Penelope, which is the opening performance of the company this evening at the New Park theatre, has been the talk of every city in which the dance has been witnessed.
‘Miss Newham kicks and points her toes to the flies, with quite as much ease apparently and quite as perpendicularly as a flagpole pointing its nob [sic] to the heavens. The dance is executed in the costume which was known in the Elizabethan period as a doublet and hose, but which has been considerably modified for the purposes of burlesque.
‘There is nothing at all suggestive in the highest of the high kicking and nothing to offend the most correct taste. The dance is simply graceful, fanciful, eccentric, sensational and entirely startling.
‘It is during the second act that a chord from the orchestra bring the dancer down to the footlights; here she stands for an instant until a measure in the music is reached that suits her, and her feet start into motion. The rapidity of her movements are well nigh inconceivable, and cannot be followed by the eye. Before one position can be flashed to the retina the nimble limbs have cleaved the circumambient air in a wholly different direction. The result is confusing and bewildering in the extreme, and yet not unpleasing. When Miss Newham kicks there is a perpendicular line that flashes from her hip upward past her shoulder, past her shell-like ear, and terminated by a green slipper waving triumphantly above her golden hair. For a moment she looks like a human being with one leg. The other leg has disappeared entirely from the place where it is usually found, and then as the dancing becomes more fast and furious, and it is impossible to follow her movements with any degree of accuracy, she seems to have two limbs on one side of her body – one over her head and the other with the foot still resting on the floor. The optical delusion is complete. The press throughout the country have been loud in their praise of the very remarkable dancing of this young lady; and one and all confess it to be the most graceful and the highest kick ever seen on the stage.
‘Miss Lydia Thompson and her famous burlesque company open this evening in Stephens’ and Solomon’s satirical burlesque Penelope. The company numbers fifty-five people and is the largest and most complete organization ever seen in Portland. The advance sale of seats have been remarkably large, and prospects point to a successful week’s engagement.’
(The Morning Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, Friday, 22 February 1889, p.5b)

Lydia Thompson’s production of Henry Pottinger Stephens and Edward Solomon’s burlesque, Penelope, opened at the Star Theatre, New York, on 15 October 1888, with herself playing Ulysses and Aida Jenoure in the title role.

Rose Newham
Rose Newham
(photo: unknown, late 1880s/early 1890s)

The People’s Theatre, 199 Bowery, New York City, week beginning Monday, 2 February 1891
‘The People’s has reproduced the striking situations and sensational effects of After Dark, a play that appeals very strongly to the tastes of this theatre’s patrons. Edmund Kean Collier, a vigorous and admirable actor when the conditions favor, is now the impersonator of the heroic Old Tom, and the Eaza is that careful and occasionally powerful actress, Stella Rees. Among the vaudevilliers [sic] who appeard in the concert hall scene was Rose Newham, who, though not named on the programme, gave a capital interlude of dancing.’
(The Sun, New York, Thursday, 5 February 1891, p. 3b)

Cinderella, Academy of Music, East 14th Street and Irving Place, New York City, November 1891
‘there was a sort of mortuary jollity about the production of Cinderella at the Academy of Music, a suggestion of the dear, dead ago. As an English pantomime it is a very, very long way off, and as an American entertainment it is lacking in many essential qualities. The costumes, ballets and ballet music all brought back memories of The Babes in the Wood at Niblo’s – to which, by the bye, Cinderella cannot hold a candle – then there was deal of Bertha Ricci, of comic opera memory, and other souvenirs… . Miss Fannie Ward, the Cinderella, has the ghost of a voice… . The best member of the company if Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, who did a conventional pas seul with her best Drury Lane smile.’
(Alan Dale, The Evening World, New York, Wednesday, 25 November 1891, p 2e)

‘Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, will, it is said, star in a new comedy next season, backed by a Chicagoan.’
(Dunkirk Evening Observer, Dunkirk, New York, Tuesday, 10 February 1891, p.2b)

Rose Newham is including in a long list of ‘ACTRESSES – SHOWING BUST’ in ‘New Cabinet Photographs,’ available from ‘RICHARD K. FOX, Publisher, Franklin Square, N.Y.’
(advertisement, <I.>Life and Battles of James J. Corbett The Champion Pugilist of the World, published by Richard K. Fox, New York, 1892)

‘PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
‘Rose Newham
‘At Liberty. 325 West 34th Street.’
(The New York Dramatic Mirror, New York, Saturday, 8 February 1896, p. 27d)

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Rose Newham, acrobatic and skirt dancer, New York, late 1880s

February 16, 2013

Rose Newham (née Rose May Newman, b. 1862),
acrobatic and skirt dancer in characteristic pose.
She was a younger sister of Amelia Newham (née Amelia Augusta Newman, b. 1845), otherwise known as Mlle. Colonna, who had caused a sensation in the late 1860s/early 1870s with her troupe of can can dancers.
(photo: Sarony, New York, late 1880s)

Rose Newham appearing on tour in the United States in Lydia Thompson’s Penelope Company, 1888
‘A VERY SENSATIONAL DANCE.
‘But High Kicking Which Does Not Offend Good Taste.
‘The startling and sensational dance and high kicking of Miss Rose Newham, of the Lydia Thompson Company, in the burlesque of Penelope, which is the opening performance of the company this evening at the New Park theatre, has been the talk of every city in which the dance has been witnessed.
‘Miss Newham kicks and points her toes to the flies, with quite as much ease apparently and quite as perpendicularly as a flagpole pointing its nob [sic] to the heavens. The dance is executed in the costume which was known in the Elizabethan period as a doublet and hose, but which has been considerably modified for the purposes of burlesque.
‘There is nothing at all suggestive in the highest of the high kicking and nothing to offend the most correct taste. The dance is simply graceful, fanciful, eccentric, sensational and entirely startling.
‘It is during the second act that a chord from the orchestra bring the dancer down to the footlights; here she stands for an instant until a measure in the music is reached that suits her, and her feet start into motion. The rapidity of her movements are well nigh inconceivable, and cannot be followed by the eye. Before one position can be flashed to the retina the nimble limbs have cleaved the circumambient air in a wholly different direction. The result is confusing and bewildering in the extreme, and yet not unpleasing. When Miss Newham kicks there is a perpendicular line that flashes from her hip upward past her shoulder, past her shell-like ear, and terminated by a green slipper waving triumphantly above her golden hair. For a moment she looks like a human being with one leg. The other leg has disappeared entirely from the place where it is usually found, and then as the dancing becomes more fast and furious, and it is impossible to follow her movements with any degree of accuracy, she seems to have two limbs on one side of her body – one over her head and the other with the foot still resting on the floor. The optical delusion is complete. The press throughout the country have been loud in their praise of the very remarkable dancing of this young lady; and one and all confess it to be the most graceful and the highest kick ever seen on the stage.
‘Miss Lydia Thompson and her famous burlesque company open this evening in Stephens’ and Solomon’s satirical burlesque Penelope. The company numbers fifty-five people and is the largest and most complete organization ever seen in Portland. The advance sale of seats have been remarkably large, and prospects point to a successful week’s engagement.’
(The Morning Oregonian, Portland, Oregon, Friday, 22 February 1889, p.5b)

Lydia Thompson’s production of Henry Pottinger Stephens and Edward Solomon’s burlesque, Penelope, opened at the Star Theatre, New York, on 15 October 1888, with herself playing Ulysses and Aida Jenoure in the title role.

Rose Newham
Rose Newham
(photo: unknown, late 1880s/early 1890s)

The People’s Theatre, 199 Bowery, New York City, week beginning Monday, 2 February 1891
‘The People’s has reproduced the striking situations and sensational effects of After Dark, a play that appeals very strongly to the tastes of this theatre’s patrons. Edmund Kean Collier, a vigorous and admirable actor when the conditions favor, is now the impersonator of the heroic Old Tom, and the Eaza is that careful and occasionally powerful actress, Stella Rees. Among the vaudevilliers [sic] who appeard in the concert hall scene was Rose Newham, who, though not named on the programme, gave a capital interlude of dancing.’
(The Sun, New York, Thursday, 5 February 1891, p. 3b)

Cinderella, Academy of Music, East 14th Street and Irving Place, New York City, November 1891
‘there was a sort of mortuary jollity about the production of Cinderella at the Academy of Music, a suggestion of the dear, dead ago. As an English pantomime it is a very, very long way off, and as an American entertainment it is lacking in many essential qualities. The costumes, ballets and ballet music all brought back memories of The Babes in the Wood at Niblo’s – to which, by the bye, Cinderella cannot hold a candle – then there was deal of Bertha Ricci, of comic opera memory, and other souvenirs… . Miss Fannie Ward, the Cinderella, has the ghost of a voice… . The best member of the company if Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, who did a conventional pas seul with her best Drury Lane smile.’
(Alan Dale, The Evening World, New York, Wednesday, 25 November 1891, p 2e)

‘Rose Newham, the skirt dancer, will, it is said, star in a new comedy next season, backed by a Chicagoan.’
(Dunkirk Evening Observer, Dunkirk, New York, Tuesday, 10 February 1891, p.2b)

Rose Newham is including in a long list of ‘ACTRESSES – SHOWING BUST’ in ‘New Cabinet Photographs,’ available from ‘RICHARD K. FOX, Publisher, Franklin Square, N.Y.’
(advertisement, <I.>Life and Battles of James J. Corbett The Champion Pugilist of the World, published by Richard K. Fox, New York, 1892)

‘PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
‘Rose Newham
‘At Liberty. 325 West 34th Street.’
(The New York Dramatic Mirror, New York, Saturday, 8 February 1896, p. 27d)

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Finette

February 12, 2013

Finette (Joséphine Durwend, fl. late 1850s-early 1870s),
French cancan dancer and celebrity of the Parisian public bals
(photo: Disdéri, London, probably 1868)

‘no woman should witness and no man applaud’ – Finette condemned by The Pall Mall Gazette, London, 1868
‘A controversy which crops up periodically as to the progress of morals has lately been revived. The kindred question of the progress of taste and refinement is painfully forced upon one by the predominant character of modern amusements. That even the grotesque silliness of the burlesques should fail to satisfy the appetite for vulgar fun, and should be apparently giving place to the drivelling ribaldry of the comic song, suggests melancholy conclusions as to the intellectual degradation of the multitude. But still worse is the favour openly accorded to exhibitions which lay claim to no other attraction that their immodesty. One notorious person, whom it would be an insult to the profession to which she affects to belong to call an actress, was lately advertised as appearing in certain parts which, ”in variety of character, action, and costume,” afforded great scope for the display of her ”remarkable personal beauty and statuesque grace.” ”The Faultless contour” of a young girl, as exhibited in the dangerous evolutions of the trapeze, is the enticement to another theatre. The entertainment which, under the title of poses plastiques, the more shameless order of fast men used to seek in obscure corners of the town are now flaunted on the stage of the public theatres. And, to crown all, a lewd dance, which the by no means prudish moral sense of the French has put under the ban of the police, is adopted as the great feature of a brilliant ballet at one of the most popular places of amusement in London. In the low dancing saloons of Paris the police wink at the vivacious obscenity of the Cancan, and those who wish to study it must follow it to its frowzy haunts; any theatre would be instantly closed which dared to put it on the stage. In London, however, where the public morals are under the enlightened an vigilant protection of the Lord Chamberlain and the justices of the peace, it is openly paraded in the bills of the Alhambra’s performance there is not the faintest redeeming feature of elegance or artistic skill. Among the common frequenters of the Closerie, or the Valentino, or any other of the Parisian casinos, better dancers might be discovered at any time. The characteristic immodesty of the Cancan is certainly toned down in Mdlle. Finette’s version, but her capers are nevertheless such as no woman should witness and no man applaud. A correspondent lately suggested that the low character of music-hall entertainments was due to the restraints imposed on them by the present law, which interdicts dramatic performances. If so, we can hardly imagine a stronger argument in favour of more liberal legislation in regard to this establishment from the Cancan ballet at the Alhambra.’
(The Pall Mall Gazette, London, Friday, 27 March 1868, p. 11b)

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February 12, 2013

Finette (Joséphine Durwend, fl. late 1850s-early 1870s),
French cancan dancer and celebrity of the Parisian public bals
(photo: Disdéri, London, probably 1868)

‘no woman should witness and no man applaud’ – Finette condemned by The Pall Mall Gazette, London, 1868
‘A controversy which crops up periodically as to the progress of morals has lately been revived. The kindred question of the progress of taste and refinement is painfully forced upon one by the predominant character of modern amusements. That even the grotesque silliness of the burlesques should fail to satisfy the appetite for vulgar fun, and should be apparently giving place to the drivelling ribaldry of the comic song, suggests melancholy conclusions as to the intellectual degradation of the multitude. But still worse is the favour openly accorded to exhibitions which lay claim to no other attraction that their immodesty. One notorious person, whom it would be an insult to the profession to which she affects to belong to call an actress, was lately advertised as appearing in certain parts which, ”in variety of character, action, and costume,” afforded great scope for the display of her ”remarkable personal beauty and statuesque grace.” ”The Faultless contour” of a young girl, as exhibited in the dangerous evolutions of the trapeze, is the enticement to another theatre. The entertainment which, under the title of poses plastiques, the more shameless order of fast men used to seek in obscure corners of the town are now flaunted on the stage of the public theatres. And, to crown all, a lewd dance, which the by no means prudish moral sense of the French has put under the ban of the police, is adopted as the great feature of a brilliant ballet at one of the most popular places of amusement in London. In the low dancing saloons of Paris the police wink at the vivacious obscenity of the Cancan, and those who wish to study it must follow it to its frowzy haunts; any theatre would be instantly closed which dared to put it on the stage. In London, however, where the public morals are under the enlightened an vigilant protection of the Lord Chamberlain and the justices of the peace, it is openly paraded in the bills of the Alhambra’s performance there is not the faintest redeeming feature of elegance or artistic skill. Among the common frequenters of the Closerie, or the Valentino, or any other of the Parisian casinos, better dancers might be discovered at any time. The characteristic immodesty of the Cancan is certainly toned down in Mdlle. Finette’s version, but her capers are nevertheless such as no woman should witness and no man applaud. A correspondent lately suggested that the low character of music-hall entertainments was due to the restraints imposed on them by the present law, which interdicts dramatic performances. If so, we can hardly imagine a stronger argument in favour of more liberal legislation in regard to this establishment from the Cancan ballet at the Alhambra.’
(The Pall Mall Gazette, London, Friday, 27 March 1868, p. 11b)

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February 12, 2013

Finette (Joséphine Durwend, fl. late 1850s-early 1870s),
French cancan dancer and celebrity of the Parisian public bals
(photo: Disdéri, London, probably 1868)

‘no woman should witness and no man applaud’ – Finette condemned by The Pall Mall Gazette, London, 1868
‘A controversy which crops up periodically as to the progress of morals has lately been revived. The kindred question of the progress of taste and refinement is painfully forced upon one by the predominant character of modern amusements. That even the grotesque silliness of the burlesques should fail to satisfy the appetite for vulgar fun, and should be apparently giving place to the drivelling ribaldry of the comic song, suggests melancholy conclusions as to the intellectual degradation of the multitude. But still worse is the favour openly accorded to exhibitions which lay claim to no other attraction that their immodesty. One notorious person, whom it would be an insult to the profession to which she affects to belong to call an actress, was lately advertised as appearing in certain parts which, “in variety of character, action, and costume,” afforded great scope for the display of her “remarkable personal beauty and statuesque grace.” “The Faultless contour” of a young girl, as exhibited in the dangerous evolutions of the trapeze, is the enticement to another theatre. The entertainment which, under the title of poses plastiques, the more shameless order of fast men used to seek in obscure corners of the town are now flaunted on the stage of the public theatres. And, to crown all, a lewd dance, which the by no means prudish moral sense of the French has put under the ban of the police, is adopted as the great feature of a brilliant ballet at one of the most popular places of amusement in London. In the low dancing saloons of Paris the police wink at the vivacious obscenity of the Cancan, and those who wish to study it must follow it to its frowzy haunts; any theatre would be instantly closed which dared to put it on the stage. In London, however, where the public morals are under the enlightened an vigilant protection of the Lord Chamberlain and the justices of the peace, it is openly paraded in the bills of the Alhambra’s performance there is not the faintest redeeming feature of elegance or artistic skill. Among the common frequenters of the Closerie, or the Valentino, or any other of the Parisian casinos, better dancers might be discovered at any time. The characteristic immodesty of the Cancan is certainly toned down in Mdlle. Finette’s version, but her capers are nevertheless such as no woman should witness and no man applaud. A correspondent lately suggested that the low character of music-hall entertainments was due to the restraints imposed on them by the present law, which interdicts dramatic performances. If so, we can hardly imagine a stronger argument in favour of more liberal legislation in regard to this establishment from the Cancan ballet at the Alhambra.’
(The Pall Mall Gazette, London, Friday, 27 March 1868, p. 11b)

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La Goulue, Parisian can-can dancer and celebrity

January 23, 2013

La Goulue, “the glutton,” (née Louise Weber, 1870-1929)
Parisian can-can dancer and celebrity
(photo: unknown, probably Paris, circa 1890)

The Moulin Rouge, Paris, to be transformed into a regular music hall; news of La Goulue and other former dancers there, January 1903
‘It is now proposed to transform the notorious Moulin Rouge, at Montmartre, Paris, into an ordinary music hall or something of the kind. The dancing, or “quadrille naturaliste” [i.e. the can-can], as it was termed, has been declining in popularity since the departures of such notes danseuses as La Goulue, Grille d’Egout, Nini Patte en l’Air, and Valentine. Valentine, or, rather Valentine le Desossé [sic], is now the owner of a large livery stable with a number of horses, while La Goulue is in the lion-taming line and keeps a menagerie. Others of the former dancers of the Moulin Rouge have died, or have wearied and settled down as steady family people.’
(The New York Times, New York, Monday, 26 January 1903, p.10e)