Posts Tagged ‘Coronet Theatre (Notting Hill Gate)’

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Dido Drake, English actress and singer

February 2, 2014

Dido Drake (1879-1970; theatrical career 1898-1909), English actress and singer
(photo: unknown, probably UK, circa 1898; Ogden’s Guinea Gold cigarette card issued about 1900)

‘One of Mr C. Trevelyan’s dramatic pupils – Miss Dido Drake – has obtained a West-end engagement, Mr Thomas Thorne having selected her as understudy for the part of Margery, in Meadow Sweet, and Belinda, in Our Boys.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 6 August 1898, p. 12c)

Miss Drake appeared as Sparkle in the pantomime Cinderella at the Coronet Theatre, Notting Hill Gate, London, produced on 24 December 1898 – Frances Earle appeared as Prince Paragon, Julie Bing as Cinderella and Horace Lingard as Baron Stoney.

‘Miss Dido Drake, who is at present touring with Mr. Edward Terry and playing the part of Lavender, lately appeared at the Avenue Theatre with Mr. Weedon Grossmith in The Night of the Party. Previous to this she played in The Little Minister on tour.’
(The Tatler, London, Wednesday, 19 March 1902, p. 505c)

Dido Drake was born in Wavertree, Liverpool, on 11 November 1879 and baptised Harriette Jane Mercedes Drake at the chapel of St. Nicholas, Liverpool, on 3 December 1879; her parents were James Adolphus Drake (1846-1890), a broker and commission agent, and his wife, Alison (née Lycett), who was born in Edinburgh in 1855. In 1909 Miss Drake was married to the former actor, Arthur Steffens Hardy (1873-1939), a prolific writer of short stories for boys, whose real name was Arthur Joseph Steffens. Following his death she married in 1939 Leslie Binmore Burlace (1891-1962) and died on 12 October 1970.

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Winifred Hare, English actress and singer, and popular pantomime principal boy

February 2, 2013

Winifred Hare (1875-?1930), English actress and singer,
and popular pantomime principal boy
(photo: Hana, London, circa 1908)

‘When [Hervé’s] Chilperic is produced at the Coronet and Camden Theatres next March it will be found considerably altered in story from the version which set the town a-talking thirty years ago, when, as The Referee reminds us, the brothers Mansell produced it at the Lyceum. The new author, inspired by the whitewashing with which recent historians have rehabilitated Henry VIII., Nero, and other quondam-reprobates, has set himself the task of demonstrating that Fredegonde, the much-abused third wife of Chilperic, was much more sinned against then sinning, and that the charges recited against her by historians are mere symptoms of a monstrous conspiracy organised by Brunchant, Chilperic’s brother’s wife, to punish Fredegonde because she prevented Brunchant from stealing Chilperic’s kingdom. In this formidable task the new author has an ally who will surely convince the most pedantic of critics that the historians must have been mistaken, for “Fredegonde” is to be represented by Miss Winifred Hare, and in this re-incarnation no one will think her capable of any worse crime than that of stealing hearts.
(programme note, Camden Theatre, Camden Town, north London, week beginning Monday, 8 December 1902)