Posts Tagged ‘Criterion Theatre (New York)’

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Mrs Leslie Carter as La Du Barry, 1901

October 4, 2013

Mrs Leslie Carter (1857-1937), American actress, as she appeared in the title role of David Belasco‘s play, Du Barry, which was first produced on 12 December 1901 at the New National Theatre, Washington, D.C., before transferring to the Criterion Theatre, New York, on 25 December 1901.
(photo: Sarony, New York, 1901)

The New National Theatre, Washington, D.C., Thursday, 12 December 1901.
‘The Du Barry play, after many postponements, was brought out on Thursday night. The performance started before 8 o’clock and ran until after midnight, and yet it was difficult for the observer from the front to point out what material might wisely be sacrificed, for the play is interesting from beginning to end. It is unfortunately that the people who conquer in the battles of every-day life, who triumph obscurely over the adverse conditions of existence, cannot be made successful heroes or heroines. The Trilbys, the Zazas and the Saphos has been exploited until the public might be expected to grow weary of the so-called ”outcasts of society.” But Du Barry is the greatest triumph of recent times. The play is a deliberate falsification of truth so far as the character of the heroine is concerned, but it is cleverly done… .
‘Mrs. Carter is credited with a ready wit which saved the scene in which she strikes her wounded lover and renders him unconscious, so that she can conceal him from the king, who is demanding admittance. It is the scene which represents the lavishly furnished apartment of Du Barry, a scene which must have cut a very considerable figure in the enormous sum total given as the cost of the production. Instead of falling on the ten-thousand-dollar bed, where Du Barry was to conceal him by throwing a twenty-five-hundred-dollar coverlet over him, the lover fell with a crash to one side, smashing $1,158.64 worth of furniture in his descent. But Mr. Belasco, who was standing in the wings, did not care for the furniture. The speech prepared for this scene was rendered inappropriate by the accident.
‘The eminent stage manager groaned.
‘The company turned white.
‘The supernumeraries shuddered.
‘But Mrs. Carter never paused. She made up some talk of her own, which answered every purpose and the act proceeded to a conclusion which brought forth an ovation from the audience.’
(The Evening Star, Washington, DC, 14 December 1901, p. 22a)

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the seven ‘Daisy Girls’ in The Jewel of Asia

March 16, 2013

a photograph of the seven ‘Daisy Girls’ in The Jewel of Asia, a musical comedy by Frederick Ranken and Harry B. Smith, with music by Ludwig Englander,
left to right: Ida Gabrielle, Maude Wycherley, Ethel Gilmore, Reine Davies, Lillie Brink, Ella Ray and Erminie Earl
(photo: Dadmun, Boston, 1903)

The Jewel of Asia, starring James T. Powers with Blanche Ring, opened at the Criterion Theatre, New York, on 16 February 1903.

‘The distinctive feature of this septette of beauties is that they were all society maidens before they went before the footlights, even though Who’s Who fails to give a leading clew. This is perhaps accounted for by the fact that Miss Gabrielle is French and figures in the Blue Book of the fashionable St. Germain, Miss Wycherley is English, as anyone may confirm who studies Burke’s Peerage, Miss Brink is Irish, of a famous Dublin noble family, Miss Davies being Scotch; her ancestors owned landed estates adjoining Balmoral in the heather country. The rest of the galaxy are American members of the smart sets of Louisville, Baltimore and Philadelphia respectively. Two of them are heiresses in their own right, one has a marquisite in view, a third, the pretties of all, as she may be readily picked out, is engaged to a young man in Harvard, the heir of thirty millions, and another looks like Edna May. Altogether this is about as interesting a collection of daisies as can be found in any field.’
(magazine clipping, United States, 1903)

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Julia Marlowe

February 10, 2013

Julia Marlowe (1866-1950),
English-born American actress,
as Mary Tudor in When Knighthood Was in Flower,
Criterion Theatre, New York, 14 January 1901,
and Effie Ellsler in the same part on
tour in the United States, September 1902
(photo: unknown, probably New York, 1901)

Julia Marlowe, as dainty, as brilliant and as pretty as ever, is delighting large audiences at the Knickerbocker [sic] theater in the role of Mary Tudor in Paul Kester’s dramatization of Charles Major’s popular novel. When Knighthood Was in Flower. Of Miss Marlowe’s acting nothing but praise can be expressed, and, inasmuch as it is a rather difficult matter to evolve a criticism from a long string of commendatory adjectives, it is better to let it go with the statement that no actress in the world could improve upon Miss Marlowe’s interpretation of the role of the wilful but gentle hearted sister of Henry VIII.
‘Mr. Kester’s dramatization of When Knighthood Was in Flower has been well made, and it would seem that his really brilliant author is at last to receive recognition in dramatic palaces at the doors of which he has hitherto knocked in vain for admission. There are naturally some flaws, not the least of which is a lack of dignity in the treatment of several of the important personages, but nevertheless Mr. Kester’s reputation as a playwright will be greatly enhances by this latest offering of Miss Julia Marlowe.’
‘The cast of When Knighthood Was in Flower, while it cannot justly be called exceptionally bad, is at least not worthy of either star or play. With a couple of exceptions, not a person rose about the most insipid mediocrity. Henry VIII looked like the king of clubs, and his undignified buffoonery did not tent to mitigate the impression created by his appearance. However, the piece is a good one, and that, in combination with the superb work of Miss Marlowe, will be sufficient to insure for it a long life despite the utter commonplaceness of the supporting company.
(The Lincoln Evening News, Lincoln, Nebraska, Saturday, 9 February 1901, p. 3b/c)

‘There is said to be a pronounced educational value in Julia Marlowe’s production of When Knighthood Was in Flower wholly outside that drama’s merits as a play. The costumes reflect the fashions of a time when the House of Tudor and the English court had reached a stage of amazing splendour. They were made after designs obtained from rare plates in the British museum and other treasure houses of English history. The scenery was painted after sketched prepared at Windsor Park, Greenwich Palace and Hampton Court.
‘These sketches were then modified in such a manner as to make the scene reflect as accurately as investigation into books would make possible the appearance of the localities during the opening years of the sixteenth century. Much of the furniture was designed from models now on view in Hampton Court, that vast palace which Thomas Wolsey, who figures in Knighthood, built and presented to Henry VIII., brother of the Princess Mary Tudor, whom Miss [Effie] Ellsler portrays.’
(Waterloo Times-Tribune, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday, 23 September 1902, p. 4d)

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February 3, 2013

Thelma Raye (née Thelma Victoria Maud Bell-Morton, 1890-1966)
English musical comedy actress,
in costume as O Kiku San
in the revival of The Geisha, Daly’s Theatre, London, 18 June 1906.
The front-of-house frame encloses
photographs of Miss Raye by the Dover Street Studios
as she appeared in The Little Michus.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1906)

Auburn haired Thelma Raye was born on 6 September 1890 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nothing is known at present of her early life and training as an actress and singer in musical comedy, and the first we hear of her is in The Little Michus (Daly’s, London, 29 April 1905), playing Marie Blanche in succession to Mabel Green and Denise Orme, and Ernestine in succession to Nina Sevening, Bertha Callan, Iris Hoey, Mabel Russell and Marie Löhr. Remaining with the same management for the next two years she was next seen in the revival of The Geisha (Daly’s, 18 June 1906) as O Kiku San, before playing in Les Merveilleuses (Daly’s, 27 October 1906) as Illyrine in succession to Denise Orme, and in The Girls of Gottenberg (Gaiety, 15 May 1907) as Elsa in succession to May de Sousa and Enid Leonhardt.

Thelma Raye’s next engagement was to play Helene in the American production of the popular English musical, The Dairymaids (Criterion, New York, 26 August 1907, 86 performances). Returning to England she was re-engaged by George Edwardes for the part of Elsa in a touring company of The Girls of Gottenberg, beginning with a short stay at the Adelphi Theatre, London (10 August 1908, 12 performances). She was next seen in a tour of The Pigeon House, first produced at the New Theatre, Cardiff, on 27 June 1910; during the run her part of Léontine de Merval was later played by Iris Hoey and Dorothy Moulton. Miss Raye was afterwards engaged to play Mariana in Bonita (Queen’s, London, 23 September 1911, 42 performances), Honorka in The Grass Widows (Apollo, London, 7 September 1912, 50 performances), and Fifi du Barry (in which part she was succeeded by Marie Blanche) in The Joy-Ride Lady (New, London, 21 February 1914, 105 performances).

Thelma Raye
Thelma Raye as Fifi du Barry in
The Joy-Ride Lady, New Theatre, London, 21 February 1914.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1914)

On 21 Marcy 1917, now aged 26, Thelma Raye was married to Percy Stewart Dawson (1888-1947), an Australian and member of the Steward Dawson family of jewellers and silversmiths of Sydney & London. The couple had already had a daughter, Dawn, who was born at Bournemouth in England on 1 April 1913. The marriage foundered, however, and in March 1918 Miss Raye returned to London. During 1919 she was on a UK tour as the lead in Cosmo Hamilton’s play, Scandal. It was at about this time that she met the actor Ronald Colman (1891-1958); they were married at on 18 September 1920. Frustrated by his inability to make headway with his career, Colman left England for New York less than a month later followed by his wife in February 1921.

Later recalling that this was the most difficult period in his career, Colman was lucky enough to be chosen to appear in Henri Bataille’s drama, La Tendresse, starring Ruth Chatterton (Empire, New York, 25 September 1922). This led to his being cast as leading man to Lillian Gish in the 1923 Hollywood film, The White Sister, in which Thelma was allocated a tiny part. Such was the success of this venture, at least as far as Colman was concerned, that he was awarded a contract by Samuel Goldwyn and during the next eighteen months he appeared in several other films, two of which respectively starred May McAvoy and Constance Talmadge. In 1924 Colman was seen again with Lillian Gish, in a film version of George Eliot’s novel, Romola, in which Thelma Raye was given an uncredited bit part.

There is little doubt that Colman’s steeply rising success as a Hollywood star soon put an intolerable strain on his marriage. The couple publicly acknowledged a breakdown in their relationship by early 1926 and although separated they did not formally split for another eight years. As one writer has put it, ‘Raye loomed in the background and would periodically appear – often demanding more money in proportion to her husband’s increasing financial success. A divorce was finally arranged after Raye was offered a hefty financial settlement and the parasitic relationship finally came to an end.’ This view was endorsed in the biography, Ronald Colman: A Very Private Person (William Morrow & Co Inc, 1975) by Juliet Benita Colman (b.1944), Colman’s daughter by his second marriage to the English actress Benita Hume. Miss Colman’s opinion of her father’s first wife was that she had ‘a jealous and vindictive nature.’

Of Thelma Raye very little else is heard. In the summer of 1938 it was rumoured that she was to return to the stage in a play, A Garden of Weeds by Ronald Gerard, which was to tour in the United States before a New York opening, but nothing seems to have come of this or any other theatrical project. Then in early in 1939, describing herself as ‘the Original Mrs. Ronald Colman,’ Thelma Raye was reported to have opened a small sports/novelty shop at Laguna Beach, California. She settled in New South Wales, Australia, about 1943 and died at Port Macquarie on 29 June 1966.

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February 3, 2013

Thelma Raye (née Thelma Victoria Maud Bell-Morton, 1890-1966)
English musical comedy actress,
in costume as O Kiku San
in the revival of The Geisha, Daly’s Theatre, London, 18 June 1906.
The front-of-house frame encloses
photographs of Miss Raye by the Dover Street Studios
as she appeared in The Little Michus.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1906)

Auburn haired Thelma Raye was born on 6 September 1890 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nothing is known at present of her early life and training as an actress and singer in musical comedy, and the first we hear of her is in The Little Michus (Daly’s, London, 29 April 1905), playing Marie Blanche in succession to Mabel Green and Denise Orme, and Ernestine in succession to Nina Sevening, Bertha Callan, Iris Hoey, Mabel Russell and Marie Löhr. Remaining with the same management for the next two years she was next seen in the revival of The Geisha (Daly’s, 18 June 1906) as O Kiku San, before playing in Les Merveilleuses (Daly’s, 27 October 1906) as Illyrine in succession to Denise Orme, and in The Girls of Gottenberg (Gaiety, 15 May 1907) as Elsa in succession to May de Sousa and Enid Leonhardt.

Thelma Raye’s next engagement was to play Helene in the American production of the popular English musical, The Dairymaids (Criterion, New York, 26 August 1907, 86 performances). Returning to England she was re-engaged by George Edwardes for the part of Elsa in a touring company of The Girls of Gottenberg, beginning with a short stay at the Adelphi Theatre, London (10 August 1908, 12 performances). She was next seen in a tour of The Pigeon House, first produced at the New Theatre, Cardiff, on 27 June 1910; during the run her part of Léontine de Merval was later played by Iris Hoey and Dorothy Moulton. Miss Raye was afterwards engaged to play Mariana in Bonita (Queen’s, London, 23 September 1911, 42 performances), Honorka in The Grass Widows (Apollo, London, 7 September 1912, 50 performances), and Fifi du Barry (in which part she was succeeded by Marie Blanche) in The Joy-Ride Lady (New, London, 21 February 1914, 105 performances).

Thelma Raye
Thelma Raye as Fifi du Barry in
The Joy-Ride Lady, New Theatre, London, 21 February 1914.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1914)

On 21 Marcy 1917, now aged 26, Thelma Raye was married to Percy Stewart Dawson (1888-1947), an Australian and member of the Steward Dawson family of jewellers and silversmiths of Sydney & London. The couple had already had a daughter, Dawn, who was born at Bournemouth in England on 1 April 1913. The marriage foundered, however, and in March 1918 Miss Raye returned to London. During 1919 she was on a UK tour as the lead in Cosmo Hamilton’s play, Scandal. It was at about this time that she met the actor Ronald Colman (1891-1958); they were married at on 18 September 1920. Frustrated by his inability to make headway with his career, Colman left England for New York less than a month later followed by his wife in February 1921.

Later recalling that this was the most difficult period in his career, Colman was lucky enough to be chosen to appear in Henri Bataille’s drama, La Tendresse, starring Ruth Chatterton (Empire, New York, 25 September 1922). This led to his being cast as leading man to Lillian Gish in the 1923 Hollywood film, The White Sister, in which Thelma was allocated a tiny part. Such was the success of this venture, at least as far as Colman was concerned, that he was awarded a contract by Samuel Goldwyn and during the next eighteen months he appeared in several other films, two of which respectively starred May McAvoy and Constance Talmadge. In 1924 Colman was seen again with Lillian Gish, in a film version of George Eliot’s novel, Romola, in which Thelma Raye was given an uncredited bit part.

There is little doubt that Colman’s steeply rising success as a Hollywood star soon put an intolerable strain on his marriage. The couple publicly acknowledged a breakdown in their relationship by early 1926 and although separated they did not formally split for another eight years. As one writer has put it, ‘Raye loomed in the background and would periodically appear – often demanding more money in proportion to her husband’s increasing financial success. A divorce was finally arranged after Raye was offered a hefty financial settlement and the parasitic relationship finally came to an end.’ This view was endorsed in the biography, Ronald Colman: A Very Private Person (William Morrow & Co Inc, 1975) by Juliet Benita Colman (b.1944), Colman’s daughter by his second marriage to the English actress Benita Hume. Miss Colman’s opinion of her father’s first wife was that she had ‘a jealous and vindictive nature.’

Of Thelma Raye very little else is heard. In the summer of 1938 it was rumoured that she was to return to the stage in a play, A Garden of Weeds by Ronald Gerard, which was to tour in the United States before a New York opening, but nothing seems to have come of this or any other theatrical project. Then in early in 1939, describing herself as ‘the Original Mrs. Ronald Colman,’ Thelma Raye was reported to have opened a small sports/novelty shop at Laguna Beach, California. She settled in New South Wales, Australia, about 1943 and died at Port Macquarie on 29 June 1966.

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February 3, 2013

Thelma Raye (née Thelma Victoria Maud Bell-Morton, 1890-1966)
English musical comedy actress,
in costume as O Kiku San
in the revival of The Geisha, Daly’s Theatre, London, 18 June 1906.
The front-of-house frame encloses
photographs of Miss Raye by the Dover Street Studios
as she appeared in The Little Michus.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1906)

Auburn haired Thelma Raye was born on 6 September 1890 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Nothing is known at present of her early life and training as an actress and singer in musical comedy, and the first we hear of her is in The Little Michus (Daly’s, London, 29 April 1905), playing Marie Blanche in succession to Mabel Green and Denise Orme, and Ernestine in succession to Nina Sevening, Bertha Callan, Iris Hoey, Mabel Russell and Marie Löhr. Remaining with the same management for the next two years she was next seen in the revival of The Geisha (Daly’s, 18 June 1906) as O Kiku San, before playing in Les Merveilleuses (Daly’s, 27 October 1906) as Illyrine in succession to Denise Orme, and in The Girls of Gottenberg (Gaiety, 15 May 1907) as Elsa in succession to May de Sousa and Enid Leonhardt.

Thelma Raye’s next engagement was to play Helene in the American production of the popular English musical, The Dairymaids (Criterion, New York, 26 August 1907, 86 performances). Returning to England she was re-engaged by George Edwardes for the part of Elsa in a touring company of The Girls of Gottenberg, beginning with a short stay at the Adelphi Theatre, London (10 August 1908, 12 performances). She was next seen in a tour of The Pigeon House, first produced at the New Theatre, Cardiff, on 27 June 1910; during the run her part of Léontine de Merval was later played by Iris Hoey and Dorothy Moulton. Miss Raye was afterwards engaged to play Mariana in Bonita (Queen’s, London, 23 September 1911, 42 performances), Honorka in The Grass Widows (Apollo, London, 7 September 1912, 50 performances), and Fifi du Barry (in which part she was succeeded by Marie Blanche) in The Joy-Ride Lady (New, London, 21 February 1914, 105 performances).

Thelma Raye
Thelma Raye as Fifi du Barry in
The Joy-Ride Lady, New Theatre, London, 21 February 1914.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1914)

On 21 Marcy 1917, now aged 26, Thelma Raye was married to Percy Stewart Dawson (1888-1947), an Australian and member of the Steward Dawson family of jewellers and silversmiths of Sydney & London. The couple had already had a daughter, Dawn, who was born at Bournemouth in England on 1 April 1913. The marriage foundered, however, and in March 1918 Miss Raye returned to London. During 1919 she was on a UK tour as the lead in Cosmo Hamilton’s play, Scandal. It was at about this time that she met the actor Ronald Colman (1891-1958); they were married at on 18 September 1920. Frustrated by his inability to make headway with his career, Colman left England for New York less than a month later followed by his wife in February 1921.

Later recalling that this was the most difficult period in his career, Colman was lucky enough to be chosen to appear in Henri Bataille’s drama, La Tendresse, starring Ruth Chatterton (Empire, New York, 25 September 1922). This led to his being cast as leading man to Lillian Gish in the 1923 Hollywood film, The White Sister, in which Thelma was allocated a tiny part. Such was the success of this venture, at least as far as Colman was concerned, that he was awarded a contract by Samuel Goldwyn and during the next eighteen months he appeared in several other films, two of which respectively starred May McAvoy and Constance Talmadge. In 1924 Colman was seen again with Lillian Gish, in a film version of George Eliot’s novel, Romola, in which Thelma Raye was given an uncredited bit part.

There is little doubt that Colman’s steeply rising success as a Hollywood star soon put an intolerable strain on his marriage. The couple publicly acknowledged a breakdown in their relationship by early 1926 and although separated they did not formally split for another eight years. As one writer has put it, ‘Raye loomed in the background and would periodically appear – often demanding more money in proportion to her husband’s increasing financial success. A divorce was finally arranged after Raye was offered a hefty financial settlement and the parasitic relationship finally came to an end.’ This view was endorsed in the biography, Ronald Colman: A Very Private Person (William Morrow & Co Inc, 1975) by Juliet Benita Colman (b.1944), Colman’s daughter by his second marriage to the English actress Benita Hume. Miss Colman’s opinion of her father’s first wife was that she had ‘a jealous and vindictive nature.’

Of Thelma Raye very little else is heard. In the summer of 1938 it was rumoured that she was to return to the stage in a play, A Garden of Weeds by Ronald Gerard, which was to tour in the United States before a New York opening, but nothing seems to have come of this or any other theatrical project. Then in early in 1939, describing herself as ‘the Original Mrs. Ronald Colman,’ Thelma Raye was reported to have opened a small sports/novelty shop at Laguna Beach, California. She settled in New South Wales, Australia, about 1943 and died at Port Macquarie on 29 June 1966.