Posts Tagged ‘De Castro Troupe’

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The Great Blind Bartell, the naval Crimean hero, English vocalist and composer

July 19, 2014

C.H. Bartell (active late 1860s-1898), English blind vocalist and composer, sometimes billed as ‘The Great Blind Bartell’ and the ‘naval Crimean hero, with his flag entertainment’
(carte de visite photo: A.R. MacWilliams, 16 South Hanover Street, Glasgow, circa 1875)
Bartell, whose real name was Charles Henry Huntley, was born in London on 14 July 1835, the son of Henry Huntley, a brewer (later licensed victualler) and his wife, Elizabeth, and baptized at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green on 28 June 1837. He joined the navy at an early age but was blinded in an accident during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Twice married and father to a number of children, he died at home on 7 Sept 1901 at 18 Dudley Road, Sale, Cheshire.

The Middlesex music hall, Edgware Road, London, week beginning Monday, 30 December 1867
‘Mr. Bartell, a blind vocalist, sang several songs, the words of which are written by himself. One of these effusions related to ”What we want to know.” Another, which he called ”The Flags of all Nations,” glances at prominent tropics connected with different European states, and in a third Mr. Bartell recapitulated the achievements of 1867, and concluded by reciting some lines composed by himself, in which he described how he lost his sight when he was present as a sailor at the taking of Sebastopol. He has a powerful voice, and sings very forcibly. The audience heartily cheered him.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 5 January 1868, p. 6d)

Alhambra music hall, Worcester, week beginning Monday, 11 January 1869
‘Mr. C.H. Bartell, the blind descriptive vocalist and author, from the Crystal Palace, London, whose great international song, ”The Flags of All Nations,” has been received with much applause. Mr Bartell is one of the Crimean heroes, and he recites some verses relating to that dreadful contest, in which he gives an account of his life, and touchingly alludes to the loss of his sight.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 17 January 1869, p. 13d)

People’s Concert Hall, Stockport, Cheshire, week beginning Monday, 4 March 1872
‘We have this week to report the great success of the De Castro Troupe (gymnast and acrobats); also Le Petit Tom and Young England in their daring performance on the high trapeze. Mr. C.H. Hartell (blind descriptive vocalist) sings several songs of his own composing in a manner which elicits frequent applause. Mr. H. Beresford (comic), and Miss Bartell (serio-comic and dancer), with Mr and Mrs J. Whittingham (Negroists), complete the company.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 10 March 1872, p. 7b)

‘Charles Huntley Bartell, a Crimean veteran, who lost his sight in action, has died at his home in Sale, Manchester. ”Blind Bartell,” as he was known, gained quite a local reputation as a vocalist and entertainer, and some of his verses so impressed Queen Victoria that she made him a money grant. He was the oldest naval pensioner in Manchester, and possessed medals for Alma, Sebastopol and Inkerman. When Lord Roberts last visited Manchester he responded at the dinner given on behalf of the naval section of the Crimean veterans.’
(The Teedsale Mercury, Barnard Castle, Wednesday, 18 September 1901, p. 6f)

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July 19, 2014

C.H. Bartell (active late 1860s-1898), English blind vocalist and composer, sometimes billed as ‘The Great Blind Bartell’ and the ‘naval Crimean hero, with his flag entertainment’
(carte de visite photo: A.R. MacWilliams, 16 South Hanover Street, Glasgow, circa 1875)
Bartell, whose real name was Charles Henry Huntley, was born in London on 14 July 1835, the son of Henry Huntley, a brewer (later licensed victualler) and his wife, Elizabeth, and baptized at St. Matthew, Bethnal Green on 28 June 1837. He joined the navy at an early age but was blinded in an accident during the Crimean War (1853-1856). Twice married and father to a number of children, he died at home on 7 Sept 1901 at 18 Dudley Road, Sale, Cheshire.

The Middlesex music hall, Edgware Road, London, week beginning Monday, 30 December 1867
‘Mr. Bartell, a blind vocalist, sang several songs, the words of which are written by himself. One of these effusions related to “What we want to know.” Another, which he called “The Flags of all Nations,” glances at prominent tropics connected with different European states, and in a third Mr. Bartell recapitulated the achievements of 1867, and concluded by reciting some lines composed by himself, in which he described how he lost his sight when he was present as a sailor at the taking of Sebastopol. He has a powerful voice, and sings very forcibly. The audience heartily cheered him.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 5 January 1868, p. 6d)

Alhambra music hall, Worcester, week beginning Monday, 11 January 1869
‘Mr. C.H. Bartell, the blind descriptive vocalist and author, from the Crystal Palace, London, whose great international song, “The Flags of All Nations,” has been received with much applause. Mr Bartell is one of the Crimean heroes, and he recites some verses relating to that dreadful contest, in which he gives an account of his life, and touchingly alludes to the loss of his sight.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 17 January 1869, p. 13d)

People’s Concert Hall, Stockport, Cheshire, week beginning Monday, 4 March 1872
‘We have this week to report the great success of the De Castro Troupe (gymnast and acrobats); also Le Petit Tom and Young England in their daring performance on the high trapeze. Mr. C.H. Hartell (blind descriptive vocalist) sings several songs of his own composing in a manner which elicits frequent applause. Mr. H. Beresford (comic), and Miss Bartell (serio-comic and dancer), with Mr and Mrs J. Whittingham (Negroists), complete the company.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 10 March 1872, p. 7b)

‘Charles Huntley Bartell, a Crimean veteran, who lost his sight in action, has died at his home in Sale, Manchester. “Blind Bartell,” as he was known, gained quite a local reputation as a vocalist and entertainer, and some of his verses so impressed Queen Victoria that she made him a money grant. He was the oldest naval pensioner in Manchester, and possessed medals for Alma, Sebastopol and Inkerman. When Lord Roberts last visited Manchester he responded at the dinner given on behalf of the naval section of the Crimean veterans.’
(The Teedsale Mercury, Barnard Castle, Wednesday, 18 September 1901, p. 6f)

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Fred Aretlli

April 25, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Fred Artelli (fl. 1870s-1890s), ballet dancer and Harlequin
(photo: T.J. Tungate, 35 Queen Street, Edgware Road, London, circa 1875, negative number 1504)

Theatre Royal, Liverpool
‘To make way for novelties which are certain to please ”Royal” patrons, Humpty Dumpty has signified that he will shortly quit the sphere of his prosperous career at the patent Theatre. The lovely scenery, lively business, and talented company have contributed in a large measure to the success of the Pantomime, and the author (Mr J.F. M’Ardle) has displayed an ingenuity in connection with its construction which cannot be too highly praised. His peculiar ”Argument,” like the ancient ”Chorus,” is worth reproducing, and is to the following effect:- ”There was seen a great stone, and in ye midst thereof was like an anvil of steel, and therein stack a fair sword naked by ye point, and letters there were written in gold about ye sword that said thusly:- ‘Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone is rightwise kind born of all England!’ Then ye people marvelled muchly, and all ye knithts and ye squires went to behld ye stone and ye sword. And when they say ye scripture some assayed, such as would have been king. But none mote stir ye sword nor move it. ‘Marry come up, beshrew my heart, i’ fackins, by my halidame,’ exclaimed Arthur, ’ I shall gette that sworde, or, as ye manne in ye playe sayeth, I will perish in ye attempt.’ Accordingly, he dydde get ye sworde from ye stone, and he overcame ye villaine Surlichurl, and ye wicked Impe, yclept Humpty Dumpty, and married ye Lady Guinevere, ye king’s daughter, and Arthur’s sweethearte, and, like all ye folkes who gette married, they lived happy ever afterwards. (For all ye further particulars see ye Small Bills, and ye Grande Pantomime itself. N.B. – Ye children in arms not admitted by themselves.)” The Harlequinade is of the most bustling kind, the principals being Madame Elise (Columbine), Miss E. Rowella (Harlequin à la Watteau), Signor Artelli (Harlequin), Mr A. Bolton and Mr E. Burgess Pantaloons), the De Castro troupe (Sprites, and Dolph Rowella and the Great Little Rowella (Clowns).’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 4 February 1877, p. 8d)

‘ROYAL PARK THEATRE.
‘Great Success every Evening of
‘SIGNOR FRED. ARTELLI’S COMIC BALLET TROUPE. At Liberty for Fetes and Galas. For terms, address, Mr GEORGE HADLIEGE HUNT, Park Theatre, Camden-town.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 6 May 1877, p. 15b)

‘MR EDITOR. – Sir, – will you allow me to state that, owing to the illness of Mr Willie Warde, the part of Rapless, the oofless swell, in Round the Town, at the Empire, Leicester-square, has been played for some considerable time by, yours faithfully, FRED. ARTELLI
‘Empire Theatre, June 6th, 1893.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 10 June 1893, p. 17c)

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For references to Artelli’s appearances at the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, during the 1890s, see Ivor Guest, Ballet in Leicester Square, Dance Books, London, 1992.