Posts Tagged ‘Edward Compton’

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Adelaide Neilson

August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress

August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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Edward Compton

March 3, 2013

a postcard photograph of Edward Compton (1854-1918), English actor manager,
published in London by J. Beagles & Co Ltd about 1918
(photo: unknown, early 20th Century)

Mr. Edward Compton as David Garrick at the Prince’s Theatre, Manchester, Friday, 5 May 1905
‘The idealisation of Garrick happily accomplished in the play David Garrick is not a little amusing. Certainly those of us who have learned to know our Davy as he appears in Boswell would never recognise that famous little figure in this superfine stage rhetorician. The Garrick who was the Doctor’s pet was small and vivacious, with a face worn from the ”wear and tear” of acting. He was in now small degree miserly. We remember how when Peg Woffington used to make tea for him he would grumble that it was extravagantly strong – ”Why is it as red as blood.” The Garrick of the play is nothing if not polite, and yet Dr. Johnson pronounced of the real David that ”he can’t represent all modes of life but that of the easy, fine-bred gentleman” – the actor’s humble origin clinging always to him. Nevertheless the Garrick of the footlights is a pleasing enough personage in his finery, both bodily and mental. Under any other name the play would act as well. The piece is thin enough, and it contains one or two pure improbabilities. Of such is the whole of alderman Gresham’s plan, and the fact that Tom Tallyhaut is allowed by Gresham to reveal this precious plot before his niece after Garrick’s drunkenness – these things we half forget in the easy flow of the tale. Mr. Compton has now played as Davy 1,200 times, yet he successfully evades the temptation of mechanical fluency. He is at home in the task of championing the actor’s art through the mouth of the mythical Garrick. His is a genial interpretation. The performance last night was satisfying as a whole, although we thought the guests in the second act rather needlessly grotesque. The occasion was Mr. Compton’s ”benefit.” He has been playing in legitimate comedy for more than twenty years. In a little speech across the footlights he spoke of himself as a champion of comedy of the older and more wholesome school. ”There are many of those,” he said ”who are evidently glad to get away for a brief spell from the eternal feminine, in the shape of the woman with a past and the musical maid with a future – from the inane farcical comedy and the highly seasoned drama.”’
(The Manchester Guardian, Manchester, Saturday, 6 May 1905, p. 9f)

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Constance Bromley

December 28, 2012

Constance Bromley (fl. early 20th Century), English actress (photo: unknown, UK, circa 1908)

Little is known at present about Constance Bromley’s career apart from her being on a UK tour during 1905 with Herbert Beerbohm Tree’s Company. Later the same year she was with Charles Frohman’s Company on a UK tour in C.M.S. McLellan’s play Leah Kleschna, with Elaine Inescort in the title role. In 1906 Miss Bromley is mentioned as having written the play The Ranchman’s Romance, which was successfully produced, with herself in the cast, at the Queen’s Theatre, Leeds, on 20 June. In 1907 Constance Bromley appeared on tour with Edward Compton in William Muskerry’s comedy Garrick; or, Only an Actor, with Phyllis Relph in the leading female role as Violet Gresham. Miss Bromley remained with Compton during 1908, appearing in A Reformed Rake, The Eighteenth Century, She Stoops to Conquer and The School for Scandal. Two years later she was on tour in one of F.R. Benson’s companies, appearing as Bianca in The Taming of the Shrew. By 1919 Miss Bromley had become secretary and manager of the Grand Opera House, Calcutta. From there she seems to have drifted into films as a publicist.