Posts Tagged ‘Empire Theatre (Leicester Square London)’

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Zarmo, international juggler and equilibrist

January 25, 2015

Zarmo (Joseph Henry Zarmo, 1868/69-after 1926), international juggler and equilibrist. Zarmo so impressed the young Charlie Chaplin that the latter recalled his perfectionism and performing skills in his Autobiography, first published in 1964.
(cabinet photo: J.B. Wilson, 389 State Street, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1893)

‘ZARMO, a clever and noted juggler, closed with M.B. Leavitt’s ”Spider and Fly” Co. March 8th in the Northwest and has returned to town. Zarmo is an exceptionally skilful equilibrist performing very difficult feats in jugglery which balancing himself head downwards on the top of a champagne bottle. He is an industrious worker and is whiling away his odd moments in practising a new act on the sensational order.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 1 April 1893, p. 50d)

‘JOSEPH H. ZARMO has sailed for England, where he is under contract at the Empire Theatre [Leicester Square], London.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 25 November 1893, p. 608d)

‘NOTICE.
Just Arrived, per S.S. St. Paul. America’s Favorite, Europe’s Surprise, London’s Success. ZARMO. ZARMO JUGGLES ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING.
ZARMO, the Quaint.
ZARMO, the Balancer.
ZARMO, the Inventor.
ZARMO, the Dancer.
ZARMO, the Comique.
ZARMO, the Droll.
ZARMO, the Inverted.
ZARMO, the Eccentric.
ZARMO, the Wonderful.
ZARMO, the Hit.
ZARMO, the Only Real Funny JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only upside down JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only burlesque JUGGLER
ZARMO, the new grotesque JUGGLER
‘Is all his latest comic creations, including the Three Headed Boxing Novelty, the funniest thing extant; the laughing success of THE CENTURY. Week commencing Dec. 23 [1895], starring at Tony Pastor’s Theatre, New York City; Jan. 13 [1896], Keith’s, Philadelphia; Jan. 20, Keith’s, Boston; Feb. 10, Keith’s Union Square Theatre, New York. ZARMO HAS A FEW IMMEDIATE VACANT DATES. Proprietors in search of a novelty will do well to secure this set at once.
‘ZARMO, 107 Fourth Avenue, New York City. N.B. – COME AND LAUGH.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 21 December 1895, p. 672c, advertisement)

‘OUR LONDON LETTER… 16 June [1906]
‘Zarmo, who is as well known in America as he is in this country, is thinking of paying a visit to the States, after an absence of eight years. He played three seasons with the Tony Pastor road show, besides appearing in the best vaudeville houses. Zarmo tells me that he has never ceased practising since he returned from his last trip to America, and has now the juggling game down to a fine point.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 30 June 1906, p. e)

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January 25, 2015

Zarmo (Joseph Henry Zarmo, 1868/69-after 1926), international juggler and equilibrist. Zarmo so impressed the young Charlie Chaplin that the latter recalled his perfectionism and performing skills in his Autobiography, first published in 1964.
(cabinet photo: J.B. Wilson, 389 State Street, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1893)

‘ZARMO, a clever and noted juggler, closed with M.B. Leavitt’s “Spider and Fly” Co. March 8th in the Northwest and has returned to town. Zarmo is an exceptionally skilful equilibrist performing very difficult feats in jugglery which balancing himself head downwards on the top of a champagne bottle. He is an industrious worker and is whiling away his odd moments in practising a new act on the sensational order.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 1 April 1893, p. 50d)

‘JOSEPH H. ZARMO has sailed for England, where he is under contract at the Empire Theatre [Leicester Square], London.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 25 November 1893, p. 608d)

‘NOTICE.
Just Arrived, per S.S. St. Paul. America’s Favorite, Europe’s Surprise, London’s Success. ZARMO. ZARMO JUGGLES ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING.
ZARMO, the Quaint.
ZARMO, the Balancer.
ZARMO, the Inventor.
ZARMO, the Dancer.
ZARMO, the Comique.
ZARMO, the Droll.
ZARMO, the Inverted.
ZARMO, the Eccentric.
ZARMO, the Wonderful.
ZARMO, the Hit.
ZARMO, the Only Real Funny JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only upside down JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only burlesque JUGGLER
ZARMO, the new grotesque JUGGLER
‘Is all his latest comic creations, including the Three Headed Boxing Novelty, the funniest thing extant; the laughing success of THE CENTURY. Week commencing Dec. 23 [1895], starring at Tony Pastor’s Theatre, New York City; Jan. 13 [1896], Keith’s, Philadelphia; Jan. 20, Keith’s, Boston; Feb. 10, Keith’s Union Square Theatre, New York. ZARMO HAS A FEW IMMEDIATE VACANT DATES. Proprietors in search of a novelty will do well to secure this set at once.
‘ZARMO, 107 Fourth Avenue, New York City. N.B. – COME AND LAUGH.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 21 December 1895, p. 672c, advertisement)

‘OUR LONDON LETTER… 16 June [1906]
‘Zarmo, who is as well known in America as he is in this country, is thinking of paying a visit to the States, after an absence of eight years. He played three seasons with the Tony Pastor road show, besides appearing in the best vaudeville houses. Zarmo tells me that he has never ceased practising since he returned from his last trip to America, and has now the juggling game down to a fine point.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 30 June 1906, p. e)

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Jeanne Giralduc, French soprano

December 5, 2014

Jeanne Giralduc (active late 1880s-early1900s), French soprano, who formed a successful partnership with her husband, the baritone A. Ducreux as duettists. M. and Mme. Ducreux, who made several recordings in Paris in 1906 for the Odeon label, also appeared several times at the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London.
(photo: unknown, probably Paris, circa 1895; Ogden’s Guinea Gold Cigarettes cigarette card, issued in England, circa 1900)

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programme cover for the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, in its 25th Anniversary year, 1912

November 23, 2014

Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, ‘The Premier Variety Theatre. The Cosmopolitan Club and The Rendezvous of the World,’ 25th Anniversary programme cover, featuring the titles of a few of the ballets produced and the names of ballerinas to have appeared there between 1887 and 1912
(artwork by C. Wilhelm [William John Charles Pitcher (1858-1925)], English artist, costume designer and choreographer; printed by Henry Good & Son, London, EC, 1912)

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Edith Day sings ‘Alice Blue Gown’ from Irene, recorded for the Columbia label, London, on or about 15 April 1920

August 8, 2014

a Columbia Graphophone Co Ltd advertisement for several of its Columbia label 10” and 12” discs issued in 1920, including Edith Day’s London recording of ‘Alice Blue Gown,’ made on or about 15 April 1920.


Edith Day and Pat Somerset as they appeared in the London production of Irene, Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, 7 April 1920
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1920)

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four members of the corps de ballet in one of the Indian Dances from The Dance Dream, a ballet in seven tableaux, invented and produced by the Bolshoi Theatre’s ballet-master, Alexander A. Gorsky, at the Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, London, on 29 May 1911

May 22, 2014

four members of the corps de ballet in one of the Indian Dances from
The Dance Dream
, a ballet in seven tableaux, invented and produced by the Bolshoi Theatre’s ballet-master, Alexander A. Gorsky, at the Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, London, on 29 May 1911, with music selected and arranged by George W. Byng. The principals were the Russian dancers, Ekaterina Geltser and Vasili Tikhomirov, with Marjorie Skelley (recruited from the Empire, Leicester Square, where she had understudied Adeline Genée), Gina Cormani and Agnes Healy of the Alhambra’s permanent company.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1911)

For further information, see Ivor Guest, Ballet in Leicester Square, London, 1992, pp. 78-80.

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Liane d’Eve, French chanteuse and dancer

April 15, 2014

Liane d’Eve (active 1903-1925), French chanteuse and dancer
(photo: Dobson, 132 Bold Street, Liverpool, circa 1919)

Liane d’Eve was born about 1878/78 in Saint-Dizier, north eastern France. She appears to have begun her career about 1902/03 and then made the first of many appearances in London at the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, during November 1905. She also went to the United States on two occasions, the first in 1907, when she made her debut on Monday, 18 November 1907, at the New York Theatre (where she was said to have been earning £200 per week), and again in 1923. Mdlle. d’Eve resided in London for part of her career, from about 1911 until about 1920.

The Eldorado, Ostend, Belgium, July 1903
‘Au clair de la lune … . L’autre soir, à l’Eldorado, la très élégante Liane d’Eve, en chantant cette délicieuse sérénade ”Bonsoir, madame la Lune … .”, a évoqué le souvenir deces autres couplets qui bercérent notre enfance: ”Au clair de la lune, mon ami Paierrot… .”.’
(Le Carillon, Ostend, Friday, 17 July 1903, p. 2d)

‘On nous demande le nom de l’éditeur de la nouvelle danse chantée et dansée par Mme Liane d’Eve. Cette danse a été éditée par la maison Veiller, 21, rue de Choiseul. It est certain que ”la Talonnette”, par son genre distingué, sera dansée demain dans tous les salons parisiens.’
(Le Figaro, Paris, Thursday, 4 April 1907, p. 5d)

The Tivoli music hall, London, week of Monday, 8 July 1907
‘Mr. Joseph Wilson’s programme at the popular Strand resort underwent a few changes on Monday evening, the chief new-comer being Mdlle. Liane d’Eve, a French singer with an attractive personality. The chief feature of her turn is that her changes of costume are made coram publico in a specially arranged dressing-room in the centre opening of the stage. Mdlle. D’Eve has a very agreeable voice, which is heard in five songs, of which the ”Mattiche” air is the last, this being followed by the characteristic dance.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 11 July 1907, p. 12d)

‘Mlle. Liane D’Eve, who appeared at the Tivoli on Monday night, is no stranger to town. She appeared at the Empire over twelve months ago, not, however, in exactly identical circumstances. Mlle. D’Eve is a beautiful girl who emerges from a large picture frame at the back of the stage. She sings and dances quite delightfully, returning from time to time to her frame, which is, in fact, a little dressing-room, and there changing her costume, even to delicate details, in full view of the audience.’ (Weekly Dispatch, London, Sunday, 14 July 1907, p. 10d)

The Holborn Empire, London, week beginning Monday, 24 July 1922
‘Liane D’Eve, the French comedienne, sings a number of songs in French and English to evident approval, but no artistic purpose is served by her changing her costumes in front of the audience. Nor is her idea of coming down right among the audience in her ”Play With Me” number a practice to be encouraged. Many people object to being singled out in an audience by a performer – to do so at close quarters only aggravates the business.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 27 July 1922, p. 10b)