Posts Tagged ‘Falk (photographers)’

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Margarathe Urbanska, German premier ballerina, at the time of her appearances at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, 1889

May 9, 2014

Margarathe Urbanska (? Nelli Urbanska) (active before 1889-1908), German premier ballerina, at the time of her appearances at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, 1889
(photo: Falk, New York, probably 1889)

‘What is technically described as a double bill will be offered at the Metropolitan Opera House on the evening of Dec. 13 [1889], when Peter Cornelius’s two-act Barber of Bagdad and [Joseph Bayer‘s] ballet, Die Puppenfee, will be given… . As for the Puppenfee, it will introduce all sorts of amazing episodes, and will show off, presumably, the beauty and grace of Fräulein Urbanska, the new première. The plot of the Puppenfee has kinship to that of Coppelia and sundry other productions, of which one of Hoffmann’s tales has supplied the basic element.’
(The Sun, New York, New York, Sunday, 24 November 1889, p. 3c)

‘The revival of The Queen of Sheba was effected at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening [29 November 1889] with all the pomp and circumstance required by Mosenthal’s libretto and Goldmark’s score… . Between the splendor of the legendary material chosen by the playwrite, and the brilliancy of the episodes woven into the story, the eye finds in The Queen of Sheba, as brought forth at the Metropolitan, quite as much entrainment as the ear… .
‘Of the scenic attire of The Queen of Sheba … Nothing beheld on the operatic stage in American has equalled, indeed, in showiness, the Queen’s entry into the palace in Act I., and the numerous scenic requirements of the remainder of the libretta were quite as felicitously fulfilled in every point. The ballet in Act III., which by the way, was unusually well managed, introduced that rarest of rare birds – a really young and comely premiere – in the person of Fräulein Urbanska. There was a very large and fashionable audience in attendance, and the singers were again and again called before the curtain at the end of each act.’
(The Sun, New York, New York, Saturday, 30 November 1889, p. 2f)

‘… Fortunately, the scenic artist and costumier is at hand to delight the spectator, and for the third act of The Queen of Sheba some very pretty ballet music has been written. The latter fact has been turned to account this winter, and the dancing at the Metropolitan is worthy of Goldmark’s dainty measures. In Fräulein Urbanska, Mr. [Edmund C.] Stanton has favored the frequenters of the opera house with a premier danseuse whose comeliness is an agreeable relief to the plainness of the average ballerina. Within the recollection of the present generation, in fact, so pretty and graceful a creature has not been beheld in the gauzy attire of her tribe before the footlights. Dancers more prodigal of feats than Fräulein Urbanska have been fairly numerous, but judging from the premier’s performance in The Queen of Sheba, her efforts in terpsichorean pantomime, so to put it, and in that department of her art known as the danse noble, are likely to diffuse lively satisfaction. Last night the ballet was heartily applauded, as it was when first gone through with on Wednesday of last week.’
(The Sun, New York, New York, Tuesday, 3 December 1889, p. 7b)

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Isadore Rush

April 24, 2013

‘She is beautiful and her face and carriage have a peculiar charm … . Her laugh is like low music…’
(Willa Cather, Nebraska State Journal, Nebraska, Thursday, 13 September 1894, p. 5c)

a cabinet photograph of Isadore Rush (Mrs Roland Reed, d. 1904), American actress and singer, as Cleopatra Sturgess, ‘a twentieth-century woman,’ in The Politician; or, The Woman’s Plank, a satire in four acts by Sydney Rosenfeld, based in the original by David D. Lloyd, produced by Roland Reed in 1894
(photo: Falk, New York, 1894)

Isadore Rush and Company on tour in Hugh Morton’s Glittering Gloria, Walker Theatre, Winnipeg, Canada, Tuesday, 4 October 1904
‘Was Glittering Gloria quite as glittering as had been anticipated by last night’s big audience at Mr. Walker’s play house/
‘Perhaps not.
‘But there’s one thing sure, and that is that none of us can truthfully say we didn’t get the worth of our money if a good hearty laugh is what we wanted.
‘What some of us were looking for – and didn’t find – was the glint and glitter of regulation musical comedy.
‘But bless your heart, there wasn’t any real regret because we mistook the character of the entertainment.
‘After all, you know, amusement is the chief end and aim of all up-to-date theatrical representations, and, judged by that standard, Glittering Gloria was a hit with a capital H.
‘Yes, indeed, no disputing that: for I saw ordinarily undemonstrative persons holding their sides with uncontrollable laughter – and some of the roars of that gathering caused windows to rattle across the street.
‘What if the situations are impossible? What if the plot is hackneyed?
‘If the show makes folks laugh, what else can you ask?
‘Back to the mines with your carping critics!
‘Crudely fashioned is it?
‘Well, who cares so long as it makes us merry?
‘And, come to think of it, perhaps if the show had been the stereotyped musical comedy that some of us expected, we shouldn’t have been half as well pleased.
‘Honestly, now, don’t you think there was quite enough singing as it was – considering the singers.
‘Now for instance take our old friend Isadore Rush – she of the sozodont smile and the fluffy gowns.
‘We’re all fond of her, of course, dainty little woman, but goodness gracious you didn’t want to hear Isadore sing any more, did you?
‘Well, rather not!
‘Isadore has a pretty prance and oh, such pearly teeth. But her singing – well a little of Isadore’s singing goes such a long way.
‘And then there’s lovely little Lulu Loudon. Lulu’s all right, yes, indeed, but fancy having her warbling at you all evening.
‘Why it would be enough to – well, never mind, but it’s just as well that Glittering Gloria has been altered from musical comedy to farce don’t you think?
For originally it was musical comedy you know – that is it was in New York.
‘Yes, and come to think of it, as musical comedy in New York it was a frost – a blighting frost that lowered the grade of Fisher and Ryley’s bank account.
‘Miss Rush did most of her work in the second act, but she wears lovely gowns in all the acts and looks even more stunning than ever.
‘The part she has is rather a boisterous one, but our fair Isadore just seems to take a delight in hustling round – in Rush to work, so to speak.
‘Yes, and think of all the hustling between acts to don those Worth creations. Haven’t seen what her press agent said, but, of course, they are Worth creations. They always are.
‘Wilton Heriot as Toddleby, an eccentric Englishman – all stage Englishmen are eccentric, you know – was one of the special hits. Some of Mr. Heriot’s business is particularly funny.
Edward Favor’s bright comedy helps out the third act – and it needs the assistance. Favor used to be one of the vaudeville headliners and in his new field is also doing nicely, thank you.
‘George Parsons as Jack James has a marvellously mobile face. How that chap James can prevaricate to be sure. As Chimmie Fadden would say he puts old Annanias clean to the bad.
‘George B. Jackson does a neat bit of character work as Slapton, presenting a comedy Britisher without making him an offensive burlesque. Mr. Jackson has many Winnipeg friends, made in the palmy days of Charley Lindsay’s Columbia Opera company., and they’re all pleased to find him making continued progress in the profession.
‘Miss Olney as Mrs. Jack James is up to the mark, but Miss Loudon isn’t any better in her part, than she ought to be.
‘There is to be a special matinee this afternoon and to-night the concluding performance.’
(C.W. Handscomb, Winnipeg Free Press, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Wednesday, 5 October 1904, p. 3b/c)

‘ISADORE RUSH, ACTRESS, DIES IN OCEAN SURF
‘Well Known Theatrical Star victim of the Sea, at San Diego, California.
‘San Diego, Cal., Nov. 15 [1904] – Miss Isadore Rush, leading lady in Glittering Gloria, and widow of Roland Reed, was caught by an immense wave while in bathing with other members of the company and carried into deep water.
‘She was rescued and brought unconscious to the shore. Then her friends and a number of doctors worked frantically over her two hours in the effort to restore consciousness, but at the end of that time Miss Rush died.
‘Caught by High Wave.
‘At the time the actress was carried out by the big wave, half a dozen members of her company were in the surf with her. The waves were unusually high. Miss Rush was a little farther out from the shore than the others and was caught up by the back flow of a great breaker. The struggles of the actress to escape being carried out were seen by a spectator. He at once gave the alarm to her friends.
‘Brought Ashore Unconscious.
‘Assistance was at once hurried to her, but she was unconscious when brought to shore, physicians were called and every means possible used to revive the unfortunate woman, but without success.
‘Another member of the company, Wilton Heriot, who endeavored to rescue his companion, was rendered unconscious in the attempt, and was pulled out of the water by H.B. Smith. He was revived after vigorous treatment.
‘The accident occurred at a point were an immense pile of rocks threw the water into high surf, and it is possible that she was injured by striking on one of the bowlders.’
(The Cedar Rapids Evening Gazette, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Tuesday, 15 November 1904, p. 1b)

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Billie Barlow

April 23, 2013

a cabinet photograph of Billie Barlow (1865-1937), English burlesque actress and singer, as Mercury in the burlesque Orpheus and Eurydice on tour in the United States, 1884/1885
(photo: Falk, New York, probably 1884)

‘The Event of the Season.
‘The Bijou Opera Company will appear at Nevada Theater on Saturday evening in the brilliant operatic burlesque entitled Orpheus and Eurydice. This Opera is full of pith and scintillates with bright music and amusing situations. They music in the present production is bright, the orchestration competent and the costumes superb. The cast includes many popular favorites and some new people who will be strong cards. Mr. Digby Bell as Jupiter, and Mr. Harry Pepper as Orpheus, do all that can be done in the vocalism and the lines. Mr. George C. Boniface, Jr., as Styx, the melancholy porter of Pluto, sings ”The Monarch of Arcadia” with becoming solemnity, and Marie Vanoni does the opera bouffe business of Eurydice with chic enough to make it tell. Miss Billie Barlow, as swift-footed Mercury, recalls the pleasant impression she made in Billie Taylor and other pieces. Miss Amelia Somerville gives an enlarged living picture of an ideal Juno, and Laura Joyce Bell is resplendent in lavender silk, satin stars as Diana. The best work of the evening is accomplished by Miss Ida Mulle as Cupid. She is like a bisque figure of the German-doll type, and as dainty a Cupid as St. Valentine, instead of Jupiter, might have chosen as an emissary, and the applause she gains is accorded without hesitation, and the little lady at once becomes a favorite. The presence of any number of ethereally dressed beauties in Jupiter’s Court will carry the opera to the satisfaction of the management and please the jeunesse doree, who delight in the frolic of the can-can, well danced, under the changing lights in a comfortable and pretty theater.’
(Reno Evening Gazette, Reno, Nevada, Thursday, 14 August 1884, p. 3c)

‘BILLIE BARLOW’S SALARY.
‘Billie Barlow, the dapper Mercury of Orpheus and Eruydice, in the jaunty hat and superbly fitting cloth suit, ascended the witness stand before Judge Browne in the City Court yesterday, and, under the pilotage of Mr. A.H. Hummel, swore that while she was playing at the Bijou Opera House in 1884 it was proposed by Miles and Barton that she should travel with the company. She refused unless an increase of salary from $30 to $50 during the tour was given her. She was paid $50 for her Baltimore engagement, but the defendants declined to give the increase during the period of the performances at Niblo’s Garden, Williamsburg, and the People’s Theatre. Gen. Barton denied the promise of the increase and showed Miss Barlow’s written receipts in full for her salary up to the time she left them. The jury, after fine minutes’ deliberation, returned a verdict for the full amount claimed and costs.’
(The New York Times, New York, Wednesday, 20 March 1886, p. 3)

‘MISS BILLIE BARLOW.
‘This charming burlesque actress who has achieved such a conspicuous success as the principal boy in the pantomime at the Theatre Royal, Newcastle, is not, as may be generally supposed, an American. Her stage appellative was given in America, and given under the following circumstances. Miss Minnie Barlow – her real name – was a member of a comic opera company travelling from Liverpool to New York. During the voyage a member of the same company jokingly called her ”Billie Barlow” after the old song with that title, and on arriving in New York Miss Barlow found herself announced with ”Billie” for a christian name. There was novelty in it, the name stuck, and Miss Barlow has been known by it ever since. Miss Minnie Barlow, however, is a Londoner. She was born in the Metropolis on July 18th, 1865. Her first appearance on the stage was in H.M.S. Pinafore at the Opera Comique, London, June 34d, 1879. In the following autumn Mr. D’Oyley Carte [sic] organised a company for an American tour. Miss Barlow was a member of this combination, and on Dec. 8 she sang in Pinafore at the Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York. On Dec. 31st she appeared in The Pirates of Penzance at the same theatre, and after going on a tour through the principal American cities, we find her in the autumn of 1881 playing in Patience at the Savoy Theatre, London. After remaining there for a year Miss Barlow made her second professional trip across the Atlantic, again with D’Oyley Carte’s company, which opened the season at the Standard Theatre, New York, Sept. 26th, 1882. Miss Barlow appeared successively in Les Manteaux Noirs, Rip Van Winkle, and Iolanthe, under D’Oyley Carte’s management, and then joined E.E. Rice and appeared at the Bijou Opera House as Mercury in Orpheus and Eurydice, and made a great hit. Subsequently Miss Barlow appeared in Falka and The Little Duke, in which she was last seen before her return to England. Her next appearance was in London as a member of the Dixey Burlesque Company at the Gaiety Theatre, when she played Artea in Adonis. When Dixey returned to the Stages Miss Barlow remained at the Gaiety, under the management of Mr George Edwardes, and before long she was playing Fernand in Monte Cristo, jun. During the temporary absence of Miss Nelly Farren from the role of Edmond Dantes, Miss Barlow took up the part at five minutes’ notice, and scored an unqualified success. The charming freshness of her style was quite a novelty to audiences saturated with the conventional. Managers on the look out for attractions for their pantomimes soon had their optics focussed on the new burlesque star, and the competition for her services ended in Messrs Howard and Wyndham securing the prize. Of Miss Barlow’s merits in The Babes in the Wood it is like gilding refined gold to say anything now. The grace and sprightliness of her acting, the conscientious desire she has to please, her sweet, well trained voice, charming face and figure, and above all her modest and becoming demeanour, make her performance of Walter stand out as a revelation in the method of playing burlesque boys.’
(The Newcastle Weekly Courant, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, Friday, 10 February 1888, p. 5f)

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Ida Mulle

March 22, 2013

a cabinet photograph if Ida Mulle (d. 1934), American actress and singer, as Cupid in Orpheus and Eurydice
(photo: Falk, New York, probably 1884)

‘The Event of the Season.
‘The Bijou Opera Company will appear at Nevada Theater on Saturday evening [16 August 1884] in the brilliant operatic burlesque entitled Orpheus and Eurydice. This Opera is full of pith and scintillates with bright music and amusing situations. The music in the present production is bright, the orchestration competent and the costumes superb. The cast includes many popular favorites and some new people who will be strong cards. Mr. Digby Bell as Jupiter, and Mr. Harry Pepper as Orpheus, do all that can be done in the vocalism and the lines. Mr. George C. Boniface, J., as Styx, the melancholy porter to Pluto, sings ”The Monarch of Arcadia” with becoming solemnity, and Marie Vanoni does the opera bouffe business of Eurydice with chic enough to make it tell. Miss Billie Barlow, as swift-footed Mercury, recalls the pleasant impression she made in Billie Taylor and other pieces. Miss Amelia Somerville gives an enlarged living picture of an ideal Juno, and Laura Joyce Bell is resplendent in lavender silk, satin stars as Diana. The best work of the evening is accomplished by Miss Ida Mulle as Cupid. She is like a bisque figure of the German-doll type, and as dainty a Cupid as St. Valentine, instead of Jupiter, might have chosen as an emissary, and the applause she gains is accorded without hesitation, and the little lady at once becomes a favorite. The presence of any number of ethereally dressed beauties in Jupiter’s Court will carry the opera to the satisfaction of the management and please the jeunesse doree, who delight in the frolic of the can-can, well danced, under the changing lights in a comfortable and pretty theater.’
(Reno Evening Gazette, Reno, Nevada, Thursday, 14 August 1884, p. 3c)

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Grace Palotta and Florence Lloyd A Gaiety Girl, Daly’s Theatre, New York, 18 September 1894

January 29, 2013

Grace Palotta and Florence Lloyd as they appeared in the bathing scene
in A Gaiety Girl, Daly’s Theatre, New York, 18 September 1894
(photo: B.J. Falk, New York, 1894)

This real photograph cigarette card was issued in England in the late 1890s by Ogden’s in one of their Guinea Gold series. The photograph shows Florence Lloyd and Grace Palotta respectively as Cissy Verner and Ethel Hawthorne in the London Gaiety Theatre Company’s production of A Gaiety Girl at Daly’s Theatre, New York, 18 September 1894. A United States tour followed the Broadway run.

Florence Lloyd and Grace Palotta

Florence Lloyd and Grace Palotta as they appeared in the bathing scene
In A Gaiety Girl, Daly’s Theatre, New York, 18 September 1894
(composite photo, originals by: B.J. Falk, New York, 1894)

A Gaiety Girl at Daly’s [New York] is realistic in that it has two dozen gaiety girls [sic] on the stage. The burlesque bases its hope to success on the claim that one dozen of these are beauties.’
(The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, Sunday, 23 September 1894, p.8c)

‘George Edwardes’ London company will occupy the Brooklyn Academy of Music during Christmas week [1894]. It will appear in The Gaiety Girl [sic] that had a run of 300 nights in London and three months at Daly’s theater in New York.’
(The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, Sunday, 16 December 1894, p.9a)

The Gaiety Girl [sic], an English burlesque which has attracted a good deal of attention in London and New York, will be brought to the Academy of Music for the whole of this week. The piece is a mixture of pretty girls, English humor, singing, dancing and bathing machines and dresses of the English fashion. The dancing is a special feature of the performance, English burlesques giving much more attention to that feature of their attractiveness than the American entertainments of the same grade do. The present dancers are the successors of Letty Lind and Sylvia Gray [sic], who are still remembered for introducing the blessings of the skirt dance to America, and they are subjects of the same sort of interest.’
(The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, Sunday, 23 December 1894, p.9a)

‘The attendance at the Academy [Brooklyn] to see the new musical comedy – it might better be called a farce – A Gaiety Girl, was not great in point of numbers. It was Christmas eve, and Brooklyn people do not attend theatres on the night before Christmas. Those who did go are wondering yet what they say. No such surprising amount of nothing has appeared on a stage here for some time. It was entertaining beyond a doubt, but this was mainly owing to the efforts of perhaps three capably eccentric actors and three or four dancers. Harry Monkhouse, as Dr. Montague Brierly, was exceedingly clever. He was like a subdued De Wolf Hopper, and the audience waited for him to appear again when he left the stage. His scenes with Miss Maud Hobson, as Lady Virginia Forrest, where comical, and he has a drawl that would make any lines funny. Miss Maud Hobson was excellent as the flirtatious chaperon and woman of the divorce courts. Mr. Leedham Bancock [i.e. Leedham Bantock], as Sir Lewis Grey, judge of the divorce court; Major Barclay, as portrayed by Mr. Frederick Kaye, and the Rose Brierly of Miss Decima Moore were well received. The Gaiety girls [sic] are good dancers, graceful as could be wished for, and Miss Cissy Fitzgerald made a hit in her one dance, but, in spite of continued applause, she refused to reappear. The play went calmly on amid a storm of handclapping which developed into several well defined hisses when no attention was paid to the encore. As Miss Fitzgerald came down pretty hard on the floor at the close of her dance and limped off, it is to be presumed she was unable to continue. Mr. Charles Ryley, as Charles Goldfield, has a pleasant tenor voice and was quite willing to use it. The rest of the cast looked pretty, the songs were quite catching and the lines fairly humorous. Most of the jokes, however, were too broad for this side of the bridge. Mina, as given by Miss Grace Palotta, was a typical American idea of a French girl. Her songs were light but taking and she gave them with decided vivacity and grace. The words of A Gaiety Girl are by Owen Hall, lyrics by Harry Greenback [i.e. Harry Greenbank] and music by Sydney Johnson [i.e. Sidney Jones]. The play is well mounted.’
(The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, New York, Wednesday, 26 December 1894, p.2c)

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Mabelle Gilman

December 28, 2012

Mabelle Gilman as Yvette Millet in The Mocking Bird (photo: Falk, New York, 1902)

‘MABELLE GILMAN’S PAPA.
‘Speaking of home, it is home-and-father, not home-and-mother with Mabelle Gilman, chief chirper in
The Mocking Bird, at the Bijou. The story goes that out in Sacramento, Cal., Miss Gilman’s father keep[s] a small every-day-is-bargain-day dry-goods and notion store. Every new photograph of herself that Miss Gilman sends home her father, it is said, places in the show window, where it stands in stage, festooned with bleached and unbleached muslins and stockings upon which ”the price is plainly marked.”
‘Whenever a fresh picture arrives and is exhibited in the window, the father, so they say, takes the greatest pleasure in calling it to the attention of friends and customers. He is very proud of Mabelle. He knew her when she had only one ”l” and one ”e” to her name. Now count ‘em!’ (
The Evening World, New York, Monday, 17 November 1902, p. 5e/f)

‘MABELLE GILMAN AND CROWN PRINCE.
‘Mabelle Gilman isn’t numbered among the grand-opera stars, and, what’s more, she never expects to be. But, according to a boastful little secret she’s telling, she has warbled her way into the heart of the Crown Prince of Siam, who, it is further alleged, would put the pretty ”Mocking Bird” of the Bijou in a gilded cage were it not for the fact that his royal parents have told him he mustn’t.
‘The Crown Prince, it is said, capitulated to Mabelle’s charms when she was singing in
The Casino Girl in London two seasons ago [Shaftesbury Theatre, 11 July 1900]. So lasting has been the spell, Miss Gilman avers, that on the opening night of The Mocking Bird the Prince sent her, along with some flowers, a diamond mocking bird with a royal crest. She also holds out a white little hand to show a ring, likewise ”crested,” and points with pride to her corsage, whereon sparkles a solitaire pin which is represented to have set the Crown Prince back several hundred ”plunks.”
‘Mabelle will dream on with the Sires a couple of seasons and then –
‘But what’s the use wondering whether dreams will come true?’ (
The Evening World, New York, Saturday, 29 November 1902, p. 9b/c)

National Theatre, Washington, D.C.
‘Mabelle Gilman, with dainty wiles and coquettish grace, as Yvette Millet in
The Mocking Bird, will come to the New National this week. This new opera is said to have captivated theatregoers generally, and to about in sparkling wit and satire, with music which is tuneful and catchy.
‘A. Baldwin Sloane, who is responsible for the pleasing music, has been identified with a number of New York successes, and in
The Mocking Bird he is said to have accomplished his best work. Some of his successes have been Jack and the Beanstalk, The Hall of Fame, The Liberty Belles, and The Man in the Moon [sic].
‘Miss Gilman, in 1897, was one of the many pretty, graceful, and bright girls who graduated from the Mills Seminary, in San Francisco. At the closing exercises she, like the others, participated in recitations, dancing and singing. Among those present happened to be a wire prophet who penned some lines on this order:
”’Beautiful Mabelle Gilman is another California girl who, should the opportunity be presented, will grace the dramatic profession and create a name for herself on both continents.”
‘The well-known theatrical manager, Augustin Daly, who was then visiting San Francisco, proceeded to hunt up this ”sweet girl graduate,” and the result was that the name of Mabelle Gilman was soon on the program of the company playing
The Geisha. Without previous study or even without being stage struck, this California girl made an instantaneous hit with both audience and manager. Her next steps toward the top was in [A] Runaway Girl and The Casino Girl. Now, as the creator of the star role in this tuneful comediettea The Mocking Bird, Miss Gilman has reached a height in a few years that is a little less than amazing.’ (The Washington Times, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 19 April 1903, p. 2f)