Posts Tagged ‘Frank C. Bangs (photographer)’

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Marie Fenton, ‘The Blonde in Black’

April 11, 2014

Marie Fenton (active, early 20th Century), American musical comedy and vaudeville singer, billed as ‘The Blonde in Black’
(photo: Frank C. Bangs, New York, circa 1910)

‘Miss Marie Fenton, a strikingly beautiful singer, is known as ”The Blonde in Black,” and aside from the attractive picture she presents on the stage, she appeals with her selection of popular songs. Miss Fenton is best known through her connection with several important New York musical comedies, and for her vaudeville tour she has chosen several of the numbers she originally made popular on Broadway.’
(The Morning Standard, Ogden, Utah, Sunday, 25 September 1910, p. 3b)

Palace Theatre, London, week beginning, Monday, 5 June 1911
‘[One of] two special items at the Palace Theatre this week consist[s] of Miss Marie Fenton, an American singer after the style of Miss Clarice Vance, with the added reputation of extreme celerity in the changing of her costumes.’
(The Playgoer, London, Wednesday, 7 June 1911, p. 366b)

Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York, week beginning, Monday, 19 February 1912
‘Marie Fenton, in four different changes of costumes, all of which were beautiful, sang herself into the good graces of her audience. ”To My Home in Dixie,” ”I’m Afraid,” ”Please Leave My Baby Grand” and ”Everybody’s Doing It” were the songs sung by Miss Fenton. Her changes were rapid and she was a solid hit.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 24 February 1912, p. 8a)

‘Marie Fenton, when seen at the Fifth Avenue theater in her new singing act, was cordially received, not only on account of the way she put the act through, showing experience and capability, but because she made a dashing and stylish appearance.
‘The frocks she wore for one matinee performance were: First – an emerald green satin made on slender graceful lines with a narrow pointed train, veiled in black net, draped and held to the front by a large gold and green jeweled ornament, a black satin girdle, and the round corsage a mass of gold and jeweled embroidery; one sleeve is of the black fabric, and the other sleeve and side is of the gold embroidery and jet. A high green aigrette in the hair finishes an effective toilette enhanced, of course, by a slender, graceful figures.
‘Her first change is to a smart black satin costume, also built en train, draped and slashed on the front, the outline bordered by jet banding; short tight sleeves of black net are set-in; there was a chemoisette of the net with jet bands over the shoulders and forming the girdle with tasseled ends down the side. Miss Fenton looked very handsome in all black, being a blonde and having the ability to wear clothes effectively.
‘The last frock was a black and white striped satin, a Princess in general design, the material plaited in at the waist and over the hips, making the stripes narrower and then wider; the short skirt is bordered by deep black fringe and black fringe also forms a bertha and falls over the shoulders, forming the tiny sleeves; black silk tights were worn and black satin slippers. A bandeau of rhinestones gave the tasteful finish to a very striking make-up.’
(The Player, New York, Friday, 1 March 1912, p. 9c)

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Gertrude Hoffman

May 6, 2013

Gertrude Hoffman (1885–1966) American vaudeville dancer and choreographer, as ‘My Bird of Paradise’ in the ‘Hawaiian’ love song of that name, composed by her husband Max Hoffman [otherwise Hoffmann], with lyrics by Edward Madden, which was included in the revue, Broadway to Paris, produced at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York, on 20 November 1912 following a pre-Broadway opening at the Belasco Theatre, Washington, DC, on 30 September 1912.
(photo: Frank C. Bangs, New York, 1912, with artwork by Starmer for Jerome H. Remick & Co, New York and Detroit, 1912)

‘MAUD ALLEN’S [sic] DANCES COPIED BY NEW YORKER
‘Gertrude Hoffmann Will Soon Startle Gotham With London Sensation
‘SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE CALL
‘NEW YORK, July 2 [1908]. – Maud Allan’s sensational dances that have been the joy of masculine London for several months are to be imitated by Gertrude Hoffmann.
‘Miss Hoffmann witnessed 14 performances of Miss Allan’s at the Palace, and when she returned said that she had copies the most minute detail, even of scenery, costumes and lighting effects. She gave particular attention to a ”vision of Salome.”’
(The San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, Friday, 3 July 1908, p. 3d)

‘GERTRUDE HOFFMAN OPENING FEATURE AT THE BELASCO [Washington, DC]
‘Appears in ”Broadway to Paris” Week of September 30 [1912].
‘The Belasco theater will open its eight regular season under the management of David Belasco and the Messrs. Shubert on Monday night, September 30, with Miss Gertrude Hoffman in ”Broadway to Paris.”
‘Miss Hoffman, always prolific in novel dance creations, promises some original sensations when her new revue comes to the Belasco theater.
‘Miss Hoffman looked to Moscow and St. Petersburg for her inspiration last season, and the result was ”La Saison Russe,” which proved a revelation. Paris was Miss Hoffman’s artistic Mecca this season, and the answer is found in ”Broadway to Paris.” The spirit and atmosphere of the French capital finds expression in every stage picture, every costume, every speech, song and dance. The dance plays no small part in the revue, both in solo and ballet form, and it is in the sartorial treatment of the dance numbers that Miss Hoffman has given full expression to her poetic unconventional conceptions.
‘Miss Hoffman will herself lead the dance – barefoot – defying the peacock in the gorgeousness and color combinations of her raiment. Her achievements of the past are said to be totally eclipsed both in point of lavishness and originality in her new vehicle. It has a distinctive Parisian atmosphere and a snap that is thoroughly French. An organization of 125 members is supporting Miss Hoffman.’
(The Washington Times, Washington, DC, Sunday, 15 September 1912, p. 10a)

Gertrude Hoffman’s leg paintings
‘It’s the new style, just over from Paris. Miss Hoffman, who was never particularly strong for stocking[s] anyway, is trying to popularize it in America. She appears in her new revue, ”Broadway to Paris,” dressed just like this, with rabbits painted on her legs.
‘Leon Bakst, Russia’s great painter and an international leader in matters of art and fashion, invented the style. He insists that it’s much better to adorn pretty calves and ankles with painted pictures than to cover ‘em with stockings.’
(The Tacoma Times, Tacoma, Washington, Monday, 7 October 1912, p. 5c)

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May 6, 2013

Gertrude Hoffman (1885–1966) American vaudeville dancer and choreographer, as ‘My Bird of Paradise’ in the ‘Hawaiian’ love song of that name, composed by her husband Max Hoffman [otherwise Hoffmann], with lyrics by Edward Madden, which was included in the revue, Broadway to Paris, produced at the Winter Garden Theatre, New York, on 20 November 1912 following a pre-Broadway opening at the Belasco Theatre, Washington, DC, on 30 September 1912.
(photo: Frank C. Bangs, New York, 1912, with artwork by Starmer for Jerome H. Remick & Co, New York and Detroit, 1912)

‘MAUD ALLEN’S [sic] DANCES COPIED BY NEW YORKER
‘Gertrude Hoffmann Will Soon Startle Gotham With London Sensation
‘SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE CALL
‘NEW YORK, July 2 [1908]. – Maud Allan’s sensational dances that have been the joy of masculine London for several months are to be imitated by Gertrude Hoffmann.
‘Miss Hoffmann witnessed 14 performances of Miss Allan’s at the Palace, and when she returned said that she had copies the most minute detail, even of scenery, costumes and lighting effects. She gave particular attention to a “vision of Salome.”’
(The San Francisco Call, San Francisco, California, Friday, 3 July 1908, p. 3d)

‘GERTRUDE HOFFMAN OPENING FEATURE AT THE BELASCO [Washington, DC]
‘Appears in “Broadway to Paris” Week of September 30 [1912].
‘The Belasco theater will open its eight regular season under the management of David Belasco and the Messrs. Shubert on Monday night, September 30, with Miss Gertrude Hoffman in “Broadway to Paris.”
‘Miss Hoffman, always prolific in novel dance creations, promises some original sensations when her new revue comes to the Belasco theater.
‘Miss Hoffman looked to Moscow and St. Petersburg for her inspiration last season, and the result was “La Saison Russe,” which proved a revelation. Paris was Miss Hoffman’s artistic Mecca this season, and the answer is found in “Broadway to Paris.” The spirit and atmosphere of the French capital finds expression in every stage picture, every costume, every speech, song and dance. The dance plays no small part in the revue, both in solo and ballet form, and it is in the sartorial treatment of the dance numbers that Miss Hoffman has given full expression to her poetic unconventional conceptions.
‘Miss Hoffman will herself lead the dance – barefoot – defying the peacock in the gorgeousness and color combinations of her raiment. Her achievements of the past are said to be totally eclipsed both in point of lavishness and originality in her new vehicle. It has a distinctive Parisian atmosphere and a snap that is thoroughly French. An organization of 125 members is supporting Miss Hoffman.’
(The Washington Times, Washington, DC, Sunday, 15 September 1912, p. 10a)

Gertrude Hoffman’s leg paintings
‘It’s the new style, just over from Paris. Miss Hoffman, who was never particularly strong for stocking[s] anyway, is trying to popularize it in America. She appears in her new revue, “Broadway to Paris,” dressed just like this, with rabbits painted on her legs.
‘Leon Bakst, Russia’s great painter and an international leader in matters of art and fashion, invented the style. He insists that it’s much better to adorn pretty calves and ankles with painted pictures than to cover ’em with stockings.’
(The Tacoma Times, Tacoma, Washington, Monday, 7 October 1912, p. 5c)