Posts Tagged ‘Globe Theatre (London)’

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May 14, 2013

W.S. Penley (1852-1912), English actor manager, with his youngest son, Charles Fancourt Brandon Penley (1894-1969)
(photo: unknown, probably near London, late 1890s)

This tinted halftone postcard was published about 1902 by Henry Moss & Co of London in its ‘Actors & Actresses’ series. It shows the English actor W.S. Penley and his son. Penley created the title role Brandon Thomas’s farcical comedy, Charley’s Aunt, first produced at the Royalty Theatre, London on 21 December 1892. During the following year the play was transferred to the Globe Theatre, where it ran for a record breaking 1,466 performances.

For further details of Penley’s busy career, see David Stone’s web site, Who Was Who in the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company.

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Nan Stuart

February 23, 2013

a photograph of Nan Stuart (fl. early 20th Century),
British actress and singer
(photo: Dobson Studios, Liverpool, circa 1920)

Among Nan Stuart’s London appearances are the following: as Lisbeth in The Love Mills, a comic opera with music by Arthur Van Oost, Globe Theatre, 3 October 1911 (24 performances); as Alice in the pantomine, Dick Whittington and His Cat, Lyceum Theatre, 26 December 1911; Simone in the musical comedy, Oh! Oh!! Delphine!!!, Shaftesbury Theatre, 18 February 1913; and Maid Marion in the pantomime, Babes in the Wood, Lyceum Theatre, 27 December 1920.

The Love Mills, a comic opera with music by Arthur Van Oost (1870-1942) and additional numbers by Louis Hillier. This English version, with lyrics by Leslie Stiles, was produced at the Globe Theatre, London, on 3 October 1911. The original operetta, De zingende molens, had been produced at the Théâtre des Galeries in Brussels earlier in 1911.
‘AN unpretentious comic opera that died in its infancy. Why? Because there was no “note” in it, because it was too long, because so many of the incidents were obviously pushed in to keep the ball rolling. Had it not been for Mr. George Barrett, who was really funny as the Constable, and Miss Nan Stuart, who captivated all hearts as Lisbeth, the play would have been too boring for words. However, it can’t be helped now. I’m always sorry when a play is not a success.’
(Ded Hed, ‘Drama of the Month,’ The Playgoer and Society Illustrated, London, [15 November] 1911, p. 65)

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January 29, 2013

a cabinet photograph of the four male leads in Henry Hamilton’s play,
The Three Musketeers, produced at the Globe Theatre, London, on 22 October 1898,
left to right, Charles Goodhart as Porthos, Gerald Gurney as Aramis,
Lewis Waller as D’Artagnan and Bassett Roe as Athos
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1898)

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January 9, 2013

Madge Rossell (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
English actress/chorus girl
(photo: unknown, circa 1895)

This halftone cigarette card of Madge Rossell was issued with Ogden’s Midnight Flake tobacco during the mid 1890s. Although little is known about Miss Rossell, she is recorded as having appeared in small parts in various musical plays, including An Artist’s Model (Daly’s, London, 18 September 1895), A Modern Don Quixote (Lyric, London, 21 May 1898), A Greek Slave (Daly’s, London, 8 June 1898), and Hidenseek; or, The Romance of a Ring, Globe, London, 10 December 1901).

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January 9, 2013

Madge Rossell (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
English actress/chorus girl
(photo: unknown, circa 1895)

This halftone cigarette card of Madge Rossell was issued with Ogden’s Midnight Flake tobacco during the mid 1890s. Although little is known about Miss Rossell, she is recorded as having appeared in small parts in various musical plays, including An Artist’s Model (Daly’s, London, 18 September 1895), A Modern Don Quixote (Lyric, London, 21 May 1898), A Greek Slave (Daly’s, London, 8 June 1898), and Hidenseek; or, The Romance of a Ring, Globe, London, 10 December 1901).