Posts Tagged ‘Gracie Leigh’

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Grace Palotta and Gracie Leigh in Cinderella

April 24, 2013

Grace Palotta (1870?-1959), Austrian-born actress and singer, popular in England and Australia, as the Prince in the pantomime Cinderella, produced at the Grand Theatre and Opera House, Croydon, south London, Christmas, 1897, with (left) Gracie Leigh
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1897/98)

‘Mr. George Edwardes is indeed to be congratulated on the success of his first pantomime, Cinderella, at the Grand Theatre and Opera House, Croydon. The words have been written by Mr. Horace Lennard, and he and Mr. Edward Sass have spared no pains or expense in the production of the piece. Some of the scenes are wonderfully effective, and those of the Royal Forest and the Baron’s Kitchen are most realistic. Mr. Lionel Rignold is amusing as Baron Klondyke, and Mr. Fred Wright jun., as Pedro, is admirable. Miss Maggie May makes a very fascinating Cinderella, and her pathetic rendering of ”Now de eyes I lubb’d am flown” always gets a well-deserved encore. Miss Grace Palotta, as the handsome Prince, looks stately and imposing, and is full of go and vivacity, especially in her song of a ”rollicking, frolicking man-about-town.” Mr. Welton Dale and Mr. George Antley, the Ugly Step-Sisters, sing a capital song, ”Not always.” Of the dances the ribbon dance in the first act and the autumnal dance in the second are as pretty as any dances we have ever seen. The costumes are gorgeous, and the whole pantomime is lavishly stages and dressed.’
(The Court Circular, London, Wednesday, 5 January 1898, p. 13a)

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The Four Amaranths, acrobatic dancers

January 18, 2013

the Four Amaranths
(Mary, Tina, Jennie and Hannah, fl. early 20th Century),
acrobatic dancers (photo: unknown, circa 1915)

This hand tinted real photograph postcard, photographer and publisher uncredited, dates from about 1910. For reference to the Four Amaranths’ appearances in New York between 1915 and 1920, see the Internet Broadway Database.

‘FOUR AMARANTHS
‘A quartette of graceful lady acrobatic dancers. Some act.’
(The Wisconsin State Journal, Madison, Wisconsin, 23 February 1915, p. 6f, advertisement)

Keith’s, Philadelphia, PA, week beginning 23 April 1917
‘… The pretty dancing turn of Hooper and Marbury got something more than usual in the opening position. Both are good dancers, and pretty stage setting and costuming help get the act over in good shape. A dancing act of another kind – that of the Four Amaranths, who mix acrobatics with their stopping, closed the vaudeville bill, and the girls did very well without showing anything new.’
(Variety, New York, Friday, 27 April 1917, pp. 48D/49a)

The Amaranths troupe was originally composed of three sisters, known as the Three Amaranths (otherwise the Sisters Amaranth). They appeared in the musical play, The Cingalee; or, Sunny Ceylon, which was produced at Daly’s Theatre, London, on 5 March 1904. Their Perahara Dances were intended to enrich the exotic setting of the piece. ‘One of the most striking features in The Cingalee is the devil dancing by the Sisters Amaranth, who were greatly applauded by the Queen [Alexandra] on the first night.’ Other members of the cast included Hayden Coffin, Rutland Barrington, Fred Kaye, Huntley Wright, Sybil Arundale, Gracie Leigh, Carrie Moore and Isabel Jay, together with the dancers Loku Banda, Willie Warde and Topsy Sinden.

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Little Miss Nobody, produced at the Lyric Theatre, London, 14 September 1898

January 13, 2013

programme cover for Little Miss Nobody,
produced at the Lyric Theatre, London, 14 September 1898

(printed by Haycock, Frith Street, Soho, London, 1898,
from original artwork by Bernard Partridge)

Little Miss Nobody, a musical comedy in two acts, written by Harry Graham, with music by Arthur E. Godfrey and additional music by Landon Ronald, was produced by Tom B. Davis at the Lyric Theatre, London, on 14 September 1898. The cast included Kate Cutler as Elsie Crockett (the title role), Cairns James, Yorke Stephens, Lionel Mackinder, Lionel Brough, Maria Davis, Alice de Winton, Lydia West, Dora Dent and Gracie Leigh. The piece ran for 200 performances, closing on 18 March 1899.

For further information see Kurt Gänzl, The British Musical Theatre, Macmillan, Houndmills and London, 1986, vol. I, p. 699.