Posts Tagged ‘Grand Theatre (Leeds)’

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Stafford Hall’s tableau, ‘A Dream of China’ in the pantomime, Aladdin and his Wonderful Lamp, produced at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, Christmas, 1894

May 4, 2014

the final tableau painted by the noted English scenic artist, Stafford Hall (1855-1921) of the pantomime, Aladdin and his Wonderful Lamp, produced at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, Yorkshire, at Christmas, 1894
(photo: unknown, Leeds, 1894)

‘The last scene of all is Mr. Stafford Hall’s transformation scene, entitled, ”A Dream of China – Illustrated in Two Plates.” Upon this magnificent scene the artist has evidently expended a great deal of thought and skill, and the result is a most resplendent picture, grand in its design and grouping, and glowing with gorgeous colour.’
(The Leeds Mercury, Leeds, Monday, 24 December 1894, p. 5g)

The leading cast members of this production of Aladdin were Maggie Duggan, Julia Kent, Violet Durkin, Denny Fitzherbert, Marion Martell, Ethel Bartlett, Alfred Hemming, Austin Melford, George Delaforce, the Payne Troupe of pantomimists and the Albert and Edmunds Troupe of acrobats, also the champion trick bicycle rider, W.G. Hurst.

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Gladys Saqui, Australian-born dancer in the pantomime Aladdin, Grand Theatre, Leeds, Christmas 1907

March 23, 2014

Gladys Saqui (1884-1919), Australian-born dancer, as she appeared as Nicee in the pantomime Aladdin, produced at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, at Christmas 1907. The principal parts in this production were played by Constance Hyem (Aladdin), Nell Emerald (Brigette), Frank Danby (Widow Trankey) and J.F. McArdle (Abanazar). The cast also included Hebe Bliss, G.H. Elliott and Olive Crellin.
(photo; J. Garratt, Leeds, 1907)

Gladys Mignon Saqui was born in Australia in 1884, one of the children of John ‘Jack’ Isaac Saqui (1855-1916), a cigar manufacturer and bookmaker, and his wife Esther (Stella) (née Barnett, 1852?-1946), who were both born in London’s East End and married in 1878. Two of Gladys’s sisters, Maie (1880-1907) and Hazel (1887-1975) were also actresses; the former was married in 1903 as his first wife to Arthur Hope Travers (1875-1938), a Grenadier Guardsman, and the latter was married in 1908 to the well-known actor manager, Nelson Keys (1886-1939). Maie and Gladys Saqui made professional appearances in their native Australia and once in England all three sisters were sometime under contract to George Edwardes. Maie first appeared in London in The Geisha (Daly’s Theatre, 25 April 1896 – 28 May 1898) towards the end of its run. Gladys Saqui appeared on tour and also as a dancer in The New Aladdin (Gaiety Theatre, London, 29 September 1907) and The Belle of Britanny (Queen’s Theatre, London, 24 October 1908).

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‘Miss Maie Saqui, the famous Gaiety girl, whose death is announced this week, belonged to a sporting family. Her grandfather, Austen Saqui [Abraham Austin Saqui (1834-1889)], was a well-known bookmaker and owner of racehorses in Australia. Her father, Jack Saqui, followed in his father’s footsteps as a penciller, and began at the early age of 14 years. At the age of 20 he was making books on the Melbourne Cup to the extent of £1,000. About the same time he married. His daughter Maie was trained as a dancer under her aunt, Mrs. [Julia] Green, the well-known teacher of dancing in Melbourne, who was originally a Miss Saqui. Maie was not intended for the stage, but when her father, a wealthy man, lost his money in the land boom, Mrs. Saqui brought her daughter to England, where her brilliant career is known to every one. During more recent years Miss Saqui retired, and left the stage, and although in delicate healthy for some time past, her death came as a great shock to her numerous friends and relatives, among whom is Miss Sadi Green, now married to a son of Mr. Purves, the Melbourne barrister, and residing in England.’
(The Register, Adelaide, South Australia, Saturday, 11 May 1907, p. 4e)

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Miss Wadman as Thames Darrell in the burlesque Little Jack Sheppard, Gaiety Theatre, London, 26 December 1885

October 18, 2013

Miss Wadman (1857-1892), English actress and vocalist, as she appeared as Thames Darrell in the burlesque Little Jack Sheppard, produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 26 December 1885. Other leading members of the cast were Nellie Farren, Fred Leslie, David James, Emily Duncan and Harriet Coveney.
(photo: unknown, London, 1885/86)

Matilda Honor Wadman was born in London on 3 May 1857, a daughter of William Wadman, a tailor in London’s Soho, and his wife Harriet. She was professionally known as Mathilde Wadman or, more usually, simply as Miss Wadman. She was married in London in 1881 to St. Vincent Walter Fane Jervis (1853-1908), an army captain who resigned his commission on 26 April the following year. Miss Wadman died unexpectedly in Leeds, Yorkshire, at the age of 35 on 23 December 1892.

Little Jack Sheppard, Gaiety Theatre, London, Saturday, 26 December 1885
‘… a dashing representative of Thames Darrell is found in Miss Wadman, whose cold, for which a superfluous apology was made on Satuay, in no way detracted from the purity and finish of her vocalisation.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 2 January 1886, p. 7c)

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‘SAD DEATH OF MISS WADMAN.
‘We regret to announce that Miss Wadman, ”Principal Boy” in the Leeds Grand Theatre pantomime [Dick Whittington], died this morning at Leeds. She was too ill to appear at the opening of the pantomime last night, and died to-day in spite of prompt medical aid. Miss Wadman was well known as a specially bright and attractive comic-opera artists, and her death under these sad circumstances will be generally regretted by her professional friends.’
(The Pall Mall gazette,/I>, London, Friday, 23 December 1892, p. 5b)

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Adeline Burgon

July 21, 2013

Adeline Burgon (b. 1890), English actress and singer, as she appeared as Tommy in the pantomime Dick Whittington, produced at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, on 23 December 1910, with Lillian Lea in the title role and Madge Crichton as Alice.
(photo: Garratt, Leeds, 1910)

Adeline Burgon, born Edith Lina Burgon, was the daughter of William Henry ‘Harry’ Burgon (1858-1898), a well-known concert baritone and sometime member of the Carl Rosa Opera Company, and is wife Zoe Josephine Philomene (née Chatenet, born in Paris about 1862), who were married in London in 1887. The couple also had a son, Adrian (Adrien) Burgon (1888-1970), who began his stage career as a choir boy.

Adeline Burgon’s career flourished from about 1906 to 1916, mostly on tour in the United Kingdom. In 1906 she was in C.P. Levilly’s Company in La Poupee, with Stella Gastelle, before touring in The Gay Parisienne (1907), in Charles Macdona’s Company in The Girl from Kay’s (1908), and in The Merry Widow in 1909 with Octavia Barry and Leonard Mackay. At Christmas 1910 she appeared as Tommy in the pantomime, Dick Whittington at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, after which no more is heard of her until 1913 when she appeared in Horace Goldin’s Theatrical Company at the Palace Theatre, New York. Her final performances seem to have been on tour during 1916 in the United Kingdon in The Girl in the Taxi.

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Rosie Boote

February 8, 2013

Rosie Boote (1878-1958),
English musical comedy actress and dancer,
who in 1901 married the 4th Marquess of Headfort
(photo: Bassano, London, circa 1897)

Rosie Boote looses a dancing shoe, 1896
‘There was an unrehearsed incident at the Leeds Grand Theatre the other evening. Miss Rosie Boote, a lively dancer with a facility for high kicking, was executing some vigorous steps when the shoe of her right foot flew high up into the auditorium, and it is supposed reached the dress-circle. The lady discontinued her dance, and was carried off the stage by an actor. The audience, however, uproariously demanded a reappearance, and Miss Boote, with one foot still shoeless, came hopping on to smile her acknowledgements. Doubtless some lucky fellow is treasuring the dainty shoe of the fair Boote as a memento of an unusual experience.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 23 May 1896, p. 10b)