Posts Tagged ‘H.G. Banks’

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Nellie Stratton as she sang ‘Give Us a Bit of Your Kilt,’ 1898/99

November 6, 2014

Nellie Stratton (1875-1947), English music hall comedienne, featured on the cover of the song for ‘Give Us A Bit Of Your Kilt,’ written and composed by A.J. Mills and Albert Perry.
(published by Francis, Day & Hunter, London, 1898; lithographic printing by H.G. Banks, London)

Chorus
‘Oh! Sandy, you’ve taken our hearts by storm,
There’s no mistake about it, we are mash’d up on your form:
Oh! McGregor, you look so finely built,
If you can’t give us a bit of your love,
Give us a bit of your kilt!’

The Granville Theatre of Varieties, Waltham Green, London, week beginning Monday, 13 March 1899
‘Miss Nellie Stratton is a neat little serio, her seaside story of ”The cosy little corner,” and her description of Sandy M’Gregor’s kilt and the havoc it wrought in the hearts of the fair sex, is highly popular and instructive.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 18 March 1899, p. 18d)

The Bedford music hall, Camden, London, week beginning Monday, 10 April 1899
‘Miss Nellie Stratton, a pretty brunette, sings of ”Alice in Wonderland” – not Lewis Carroll’s little heroine, but a lass from the country, who visits Barnum and Bailey’s. In her song concerning a Highlander Miss Stratton puts Sandy in a quandary by asking ”If you can’t give me a bit of your love give us a bit of your kilt.” The hardy Scot, anxious to save that indispensable article of his wardrobe, buys a suit, hands it to his lady admirers in a parcel as a kilt, and then beats a judicious retreat.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 15 April 1899, p. 18d)

* * * * *

Nellie Stratton, one of the daughters of John William Stratton (1841-1889) and his wife Esther (née Solomon, 1839-1911), was married to the comedian Wilkie Bard (William August Smith, 1874-1944) at St. George’s, Bloomsbury, London, on 29 July 1895. The witnesses at their wedding were Francis James Peers (1867-), a musician and one of the bride’s brothers-in-law, and the actor Herbert Arrowsmith (Bert) Monks (1872-1952).

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E.J. Lonnen sings ‘Hush! The Bogie’

June 29, 2013

song sheet cover of ‘Hush! The Bogie’ with a portrait of E.J. Lonnen (1860-1901), English comic actor and singer, as José in the burlesque, Carmen-Up-To-Data, which was produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London on 4 October 1890
(portrait after a photograph by Bassano, London, 1890; lithograph by H.G. Banks; published by E. Ascherberg & Co, London, 1890)

‘Mr. E.J. Lonnen, who seems glad to get back to Lonnun [i.e. London] (the genius loci must excuse this and other lapses from the paths of virtue) as José, was as amusing as ever, and sang “The Jolly Boys’ Club” with immense spirit; even more successful was the song “Hush! the Bogie Man,” in which Mr. Meyer Lütz has annexed a most dainty little bit of melody, and the effect is enhanced by the chorus singing the refrain pp. aux bouches fermées. This is decidedly the gem of the play, and was received with enthusiastic applause. It might have been as well, perhaps, to have mentioned that it was written by Harrigan and composed by Dave Braham, and as such finds its place in No. 15 of the Mohawk Minstrels Magazine, by whom it was sung ten years ago. It is, however, rather rough on Mr. Lütz to say that this is the only plum in the pudding.’
(The Footlights, London, Saturday, 11 October 1890, p.8c/9a)

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Harriett Vernon’s ‘Young King Neptune,’ 1894

January 11, 2013

a portrait of Harriett Vernon (1852-1923),
English music hall singer, pantomime principal boy and actress,
featured on the lithograph song sheet cover of Arthur Seldon’s patriotic song,
‘Young King Neptune’
(published by Francis, Day & Hunter, London, and T.B. Harms & Co, New York, 1894; printed by H.G. Banks, London, 1894)

London Pavilion, Bank Holiday Monday, 7 May 1894
‘… The serio-comic business found excellent exponents in Miss Marie Le Blanc, Miss Florrie Robina, and Miss Maggie Duggan. Miss Harriett Vernon was vociferously applauded in the character of Neptune, her costume being simply superb… .’
(The Standard, London, Tuesday, 15 May 1894, p. 2d)

Harriett Vernon

Harriett Vernon in the character of ‘Young King Neptune’
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1894)

This real photograph cigarette card was issued in the United States of America during 1894 or shortly thereafter.

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Ada Lundberg

March 27, 2012

Ada Lundberg (1850-1899), ‘The Gem of Comedy,’ English music hall comedienne

Lithograph portrait of Ada Lundberg, probably after a photograph, on the song sheet cover of one of her most popular ditties, ‘All Thro’ Sticking to a Soldier,’ written and composed by Harry Wincott, circa 1890 (lithograph by H.G. Banks, printed by W. Stannard, published by B. Mocatta & Co, London, circa 1890).