Posts Tagged ‘Her Majesty’s Theatre (Sydney)’

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Gertrude Glyn as she appeared as Sonia during the run of The Merry Widow, Daly’s Theatre, London, 1907-1909

January 23, 2015

Gertrude Glyn (1886-1965), English musical comedy actress, as she appeared as understudy to Lily Elsie in the role of Sonia during the first London run of The Merry Widow, produced at Daly’s Theatre, Leicester Square, on 8 June 1907 and closed on 31 July 1909.
(photo: Bassano, London, probably 1908 or 1909; postcard no. 1792M in the Rotary Photographic Series, published by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1908 or 1909)

Gertrude Glyn began her career in 1901 at the age of 15 with Seymour Hicks when he cast her in one of the minor roles in the ‘musical dream,’ Bluebell in Fairyland (Vaudeville Theatre, London, 18 December 1901), of which he and his wife, Ellaline Terriss were the stars. Miss Glyn was subsequently under contract to George Edwardes, appearing in supporting roles at the Gaiety and Daly’s theatres in London and where she was also one of several understudies to both Gabrielle Ray and Lily Elsie. She also seen from time to time in other United Kingdom cities. Her appearances at Daly’s in The Merry Widow, The Dollar Princess (1909-10), A Waltz Dream (1911), and The Count of Luxembourg (1911-12) were followed during 1912 or 1913 by her taking the role of Lady Babby in Gipsy Love (also played during the run by Avice Kelham and Constance Drever), in succession to Gertie Millar.

On 10 April 1914, Gertrude Glyn and Elsie Spain sailed from London aboard the SS Otway bound for Sydney, Australia. Their first appearances there were at Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, on 6 June that year in Gipsy Love in which they took the parts respectively of Lady Babby and Ilona, the latter first played in London by Sari Petrass.

Gipsy Love, Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, 6 June 1914
‘A thoroughly artistic performance is that offered by Miss Gertrude Glyn, another newcomer, in the role of Lady Babby. Although her singing voice is not a strong point in her equipment of talent, this actress artistically makes one forget this fact in admiration for the skilful interpretation of her lines and lyrics, and also the gracefulness of her dancing and movements. Another point of excellence about Miss Glyn’s work is that she acts easily and naturally, always keeping well within the pictures and confines of the character she impersonates.’
(The Referee, Sydney, NSW, Wednesday, 17 June 1914, p. 15c)

Gertrude Glyn’s last appearances were as Lady Playne in succession to Madeline Seymour and Mary Ridley in Paul Rubens’s musical play, Betty, which began its long run at Daly’s Theatre, London, on 24 April 1915 and ended on 8 April 1916.

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Gertrude Glyn’s real name was Gertrude Mary Rider. She was the youngest daughter of James Gray (or Grey) Rider (1847/49-1900), a civil servant, and his wife, Elizabeth. She was baptised on 24 October 1886 at St. Mark’s, Hanwell, Middlesex. She married in 1918.
‘CAPTAIN BULTEEL and MISS GERTRUDE GLYN (RIDER).
‘The marriage arranged between Captain Walter Beresford Bulteel, Scottish Horse, youngest son of the late John Bulteel, of Pamflete, Devon, and Gertrude Mary Glyn (Rider), youngest daughter of the late James Grey Rider, and of Mrs. Rider, 6, Windsor Court, Bayswater, will take place at St. Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge, on Thursday, May 9, at 2.30.’
(The Times, London, 7 May 1918, p. 9c)
Bulteel, one of whose maternal great grandfathers was Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (1764-1845), was born in 1873 and died in 1952; his wife (Gertrude Glyn) died on 16 October 1965.

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Dan Agar

February 24, 2013

a postcard photograph of Dan Agar (1881-1950), English character actor and comedian,
who found fame in 1919 in Australia
(photo: Relph & Co, Preston, England, circa 1918)

Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Saturday, 20 December 1919
‘MORE BING BOYS.
‘It is but twenty months since The Bing Boys Are Here closed a run of 114 performances at Her Majesty’s Theatre, and now The Bing Boys on Broadway shows the same two cousins, the fool and the knave, once more amusing Sydney audiences as the central figures of a scattered and loosely-jointed entertainments… . Jennie Hartley made the hit of the evening as Emma, a character not much changed from the impudent husey [sic] of two years ago… . Dan Agar was the principal comedian as Lucifer Bing, a quaint and impossible apparition with arched eyebrows, well in contrast with Gus Bluett as Potifer Bing… . Mr Agar’s humour is not very spontaneous, but in the familiar ”The Fact Is” he proved at home, and, warming to his work, captured the house in the topical duet, ”Day After Day,” with his always neat articulation. Miss Hartley joined him in an extra verse in praise of Ross Smith, a tough which delighted everybody and lead to further encores… .’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NWS, Australia, Monday, 22 December 1919, p. 5f)

The Bing Boys on Broadway was originally produced in London at the Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square, on 16 February 1918, in succession to similar shows, respectively titled The Bing Boys are Here (19 April 1916) and The Bing Girls are There (24 February 1917).