Posts Tagged ‘Herman Darewski’

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Nora Stockelle, English music hall and pantomime soubrette and dancer

February 23, 2014

Nora Stockelle (active 1907-1920), English music hall and pantomime soubrette and dancer
(postcard photo: Charles & Russell, 10 Royal Avenue, Belfast, circa 1915)

Merry Moments Merry Moments, a revue by Albert P. de Courville and Herman Darewski, first presented at the Hackney Empire, north London, 22 March 1915. There were various changes during the subsequent tour: Nell Emerald was temporarily replaced by Lily Lena and by July 1915 Florence Smithson had been added.
Finsbury Park Empire, north London, week beginning Monday 17 May 1915
‘Harry Day brings his Merry Moments to Finsbury Park Empire this week, and frankly disdaining the fetters of a plot of any kind, just gives us a series of amusing scenes, linked together by choruses, and the evolutions and dances of Lottie Stone’s troupe. The effect is decidedly pleasing, and requires no mental effort to follow. Amongst the most amusing episodes are ”The Amateur Burglar,” by Hal Jones, [Fred] Hawes, and T. Gamble; ”Bookkeeping” and ”A present from a friend,” by Marriott Edgar and Walter Williams; ”The Canadian Bully,” by Lily Lena, [Hal] Jones, and [Fred] Dark; ”A swish wish,” by Nora Stockelle, Messrs. Edgar, Jones, and W. Williams. These are apparently the favourites with the audience. Lily Lena’s archness and piquancy find immediate favour with the audience, and she makes a great hit with her song, ”What a lady.” Nora Stockelle scores with ”All of you rag with me,” as does Miss [Beatrice] Boarer and Walter Williams with their duet, ”Anytime, Anywhere.” altogether, Merry Moments may be said to have made a good impression, and Mr. A. Coleman Hicks has no cause of complaint as to business.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 20 May 1915, p. 16a)

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Alice Delysia in Carminetta, Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, 1917

June 24, 2013

Alice Delysia (1889-1979), French actress and singer, star of London revues
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, circa 1916)

Carminetta, an operetta adapted from the French by Monkton Hoffe, with music by Emile Lassaily, Herman Finck and Herman Darewski, and lyrics by Douglas Furber, was produced by Charles B. Cochran at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 22 August 1917. Delysia appeared in the title role (understudied by Sylva Dancourt), and other important parts were played by Leon Morton, Robert Cunningham, Dennis Neilson-Terry (succeeded by Geoffrey Gwyther), May Beatty, Florence Vie and Marie Blanche. Alec S. Clunes, grandfather of Martin Clunes, was also in the cast.

‘Delysia Returns.
‘Whatever else may be said of Carminetta, at the Prince of Wales Theatre, it is undeniable that it gives Alice Delysia the opportunity of demonstrating to the full her completely-equipped temperamental gifts. Her picture of Carminetta, own daughter to Bizet’s immortal Carmen, is one of those performances that, should you brain and heart happen to be tuned to the appeal of the artist, simply thrill and hold you from beginning to end. Stormily tempestuous, utterly lovable, a tiger-cat, a hoyden – everything by turn, and always a great personality – so does Delysia assert herself at the Prince of Wales. It may be pointed out by the hyper-critics that she is not always perfect and that she is sometimes too violent in her passion. But what do such flaws matter with an artist who can sing and act three such absolutely dissimilar numbers as the ”Habanera,” the ”Cliquot” song, and that utterly lovely ”Farewell” which brings down the final curtain? Delysia’s is a truly splendid accomplishment, and Carminetta should find a sanctuary in every heart.
‘M. Morton is, as always, a great comic artist. As the South American wine-grower Panelli he is superlatively quaint. Another excellent bit of character acting comes from Mr. Robert Cunningham as Escamillo, one the Toreador of Carmen’s fatal attraction, Mr. Dennis Neilson-Terry as Ensign O’Hara plays a difficult part with much skill. Then there are pretty Miss Marie Blanche as the English Lady Susan – a skilful contrast to Carminetta’s violent personality – Miss May Beatty clever as Frasquita, and Miss Florence Vie comical as Panelli’s sister. There is also a charming chorus in crinolines and peg-top trousers, and a gay and youthful spirit about everybody and everything!’
(The Lady, London, Thursday, 30 August 1917, p. 199a)

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Johnny Glass

June 22, 2013

Johnny Glass (fl. early 20th Century), American vaudeville comedian
(photo: F. Barrington Wright, Southend on Sea, England, probably 1915)

Johnny Glass appears to have arrived in the United Kingdom in early 1915 to fulfil an engagement in the tour of the second edition of the revue, Full Inside. This ‘a merry, musical dream,’ written by Charles Willmott and Ernest C. Rolls, with music by Herman Darewski, was originally produced at the Oxford music hall, London, on 29 December 1913. Glass, who was described at the time as ‘an amusing negro comedian,’ replaced Harry Brown, another American coloured comedian, who had introduced into the revue his song, ‘Every bit of Love I had for You is Gone.’

Various changes of cast in Full Inside, including Stanley Brett, Ennis Parkes and Jenny Benson, occurred during the tour, which came to an end in the summer of 1915. After that Glass was featued at a number of music halls; at the Alhambra, Glasgow, beginning Monday, 15 November 1915, he was ‘excellent in quips and jests.’ (The Stage, London, Thursday, 18 November 1915, p. 22e). He seems to have returned to the United States in 1916.

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‘Johnny Glass writes from London that good colored acts are in demand in England, despite the war, and that colored turns should take advantage of the opportunity and make their way to London.’
(The New York Age, New York, Thursday, 21 October 1915, p. 6b)

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vocal score of Harry Day’s revue, Rockets, 1922

March 27, 2013

cover of the vocal score of Harry Day’s revue, Rockets, devised and staged by Charles Henry, with lyrics by Ernest Melvin and music by Joseph A. Tunbridge, produced at the London Palladium on 25 February 1922
(published by B. Feldman & Co, London, 1922)

This score comprises the following songs, all by Melvin and Tunbridge:
‘Eden Down in Bond Street’
‘Variety Queen’
‘There’s a Sugar-Coated Cupid’
‘Isle of Southern Splendour’
‘That Lovin’ Trombone Man’
‘Harem Days’
‘Automobile Car’
‘Klaxon Horn Jazz’

Interpolated numbers furnished by Herman Darewski are not included in the score.

Among the cast of Rockets were Charles Austin, Ivor Vintor, and Lorna and Toots Pounds. The production ran for 491 performances, closing on 9 December 1922.

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Maud Courtney

February 9, 2013

Maude Courtney (Mrs Finlay Currie, 1884-1959),
American variety theatre entertainer
(photo: Hemus Sarony, Christchurch, New Zealand, circa 1911)

Maude Courtney at the Colonial, New York, week beginning Monday, 15 October 1906
‘Maude Courtney, who used to sing the old songs, and who has been in Europe and other parts of the word for the past four years, made her reappearance and was given a very cordial welcome. She opened with a song called ”Au Revoir Hyacinth,” following it with a ditty called ”Put a Little Bit Away for a Rainy Day,” both of which are the hits of the present day in London. It must be recorded that they did not hit the fancy of the Colonial patrons to any extent. Miss Courtney’s personality and manner made as strong an appeal as ever which was proven when she recited ”Didn’t She Jim?” and sang a medley of songs that were once popular here and which she had sung in London. In her last selection she was assisted by a man in the gallery [probably Harry Calvo], who joined in very harmoniously. When Miss Courtney finds good substitutes for her first two song her speciality will be as attractive as ever, as she is an accomplished and gifted artist.’
(The New York Dramatic Mirror, New York, New York, 27 October 1906, p. 18a) (The song ‘Au Revoir, My Little Hyacinth,’ by Herman Darewski, with words by A.E. Sidney Davis, was featured as an interpolated number in the popular musical comedy, The Beauty of Bath, which was first produced by Seymour Hicks at the Aldwych Theatre, London, on 19 March 1906. The star of that show, Ellaline Terriss recorded the song for The Gramophone & Typewriter Co Ltd of London on 10 January 1907, but it was it was rejected. The same company, however, had already issued a recording of the song made on 16 November 1906 by Phyllis Dare. The latter, who had not appeared in The Beauty of Bath, was well known through professional ties with Ellaline Terriss and her husband, Seymour Hicks. C.W. Murphy and Dan Lipton’s ‘Put a Little Bit Away for a Rainy Day’ was among the first songs recorded by the English music hall comedienne, Ella Retford; she cut it three times during 1906, twice for the Sterling label and once for Odeon. Michael Kilgarriff, Sing Us One of the Old Songs, Oxford, 1998, states that Carlotta Levey, another English music hall artist of the period, also sang ‘Put a Little Bit Away for a Rainy Day.’)

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January 18, 2013

Madge Temple (1875/80-1943),
English actress, vocalist and music hall comedienne
(photos: unknown, circa 1905)

This tinted real photograph postcard of Madge Temple, actress, vocalist and music hall comedienne, was printed in Saxony and published about 1905 by the Aristophot Co of London.

Miss Temple made her first appearance in pantomime at the Lyric Theatre, Ealing, West London, at Christmas, 1900. She subsequently toured in a production of Leslie Stuart’s musical comedy, Florodora and other similar pieces before making an appearance on the variety stage for the first time, at the London Coliseum on 18 December 1905. After that, she made successful tours of music hall circuits, with such songs as ‘Come, Be My Rainbow,’ ‘He’s a Very Old Friend of Mine’ and ‘I’m Looking for Mr Wright.’ The latter was among a number of songs which she recorded for Pathé in 1909 or 1910, which may be heard on ‘Chez Pathe,’ vol. 2, a CD of music hall songs by original artists issued by Music Hall Masters (MHM 015).

In private life, Madge Temple was married to Herman Darewski, a prolific and successful composer of popular songs, and died in Sheffield on 8 December 1943.

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January 18, 2013

Madge Temple (1875/80-1943),
English actress, vocalist and music hall comedienne
(photos: unknown, circa 1905)

This tinted real photograph postcard of Madge Temple, actress, vocalist and music hall comedienne, was printed in Saxony and published about 1905 by the Aristophot Co of London.

Miss Temple made her first appearance in pantomime at the Lyric Theatre, Ealing, West London, at Christmas, 1900. She subsequently toured in a production of Leslie Stuart’s musical comedy, Florodora and other similar pieces before making an appearance on the variety stage for the first time, at the London Coliseum on 18 December 1905. After that, she made successful tours of music hall circuits, with such songs as ‘Come, Be My Rainbow,’ ‘He’s a Very Old Friend of Mine’ and ‘I’m Looking for Mr Wright.’ The latter was among a number of songs which she recorded for Pathé in 1909 or 1910, which may be heard on ‘Chez Pathe,’ vol. 2, a CD of music hall songs by original artists issued by Music Hall Masters (MHM 015).

In private life, Madge Temple was married to Herman Darewski, a prolific and successful composer of popular songs, and died in Sheffield on 8 December 1943.