Posts Tagged ‘Hetty King’

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Jenny Golder at the Apollo music hall, Rome

April 21, 2014

programme cover for the Apollo music hall, Rome, undated, circa 1924, when Jenny Golder (1893?-1928), Australian-born English variety theatre dancer and singer, headed the bill with her song, ‘Éléonore!’ following her appearances at the Folies Bérgère, Paris.

The popular Apollo music hall in Rome suffered a catastrophic fire caused by an electrical short circuit in December 1926. Four actresses were caught in their dressing rooms and burnt to death.

Jenny Golder‘s real name was Rosie Sloman. According to information given for the 1901 United Kingdom Census (36 Claremont Road, Tunbridge Wells, where she was boarding), she was then 8 years old and born in Australia. In 1910/11 she and Joseph Bowden (whom she married in 1914) toured United Kingdom music halls with a song and dance scena. In 1913, under her own name, she appeared as a dancer in two short films: The Cowboy Twist and The Spanish-American Quickstep; in the latter she was accompanied by Harry Perry. Miss Golder’s career began to flourish in the early 1920s when she went to Paris, where she made several recordings.

‘Jenny Golder, an English girl, with a French reputation, looks a good bet for America. But when an artiste can do low comedy a la Marie Lloyd; step dance like Ida May Chadwick, and give Ella Shields and Hetty King a run for their money as a male impersonator, she is not to be blamed for looking forward to starring with Harry Pilcer at the Palace, Paris, in August.’
(The Vaudeville News and New York Star, New York, Friday, 2 July 1926, p. 8a)

Jenny Golder committed suicide at her flat in the Rue Desaix, Paris, on 11 July 1928, by shooting herself through the heart.

Jenny Golder’s sister, Muriel M. Sloman, a quick-change artist known on the music hall stage as Myra Glen, was married in 1944 to Joseph H. Black and died in October 1971.

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Hetty King

April 2, 2013

a ‘Fielding’s Cardette’ of Hetty King (1883-1972), the celebrated English male impersonator in private attire
(photo: Fielding, Leeds, UK, circa 1920)

For a short film of Hetty King in the 1960s performing ‘Goodbye Bachelor Days,’ see YouTube

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December 27, 2012

The Six Brothers Luck (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century), British music hall entertainers, burlesque and sketch artists

‘THE SIX BROTHERS LUCK Burlesque and Sketch Artistes, In their enormously successful, Up-to-date Farcical Stketch, ”THE DEMON OF THE CELLAR and many other eccentric Variety Acts. QUAINTNESS, HUMOUR, ORIGINALITY. ECCENTRICITY, NOVELTY, REFINEMENT. Sole Agents – GEORGE WARE & SON.’ (photo: unknown; advertisement from Charles Douglas Stuart and A.J. Park, The Variety Stage, T. Fisher Unwin, London, 1895)

‘Negotiations were completed yesterday for the appearance on the Klaw & Erlanger circuit of the six brothers Luck, English comedians. There are twenty-five persons in the company, and the six brothers Luck are the principal comedians; Ernest Luck, the star comedian of the organizations, is manager for Miss Hetty King [Mrs Ernie Lotinga, whose husband was a member of the Six Brothers Luck], who is now appearing at the New York Theatre.’ (The New York Times, New York, Tuesday, 8 October 1907, p. 5d)

‘Six Brothers Luck, ”The Demon in the Cellar” (Pantomime). 20 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). New York.

‘The Six Brothers Luck are the latest Klaw & Erlanger European importation. They opened Monday afternoon in ”A Night in an English Cafe,” but changed to ”The Demon in the Cellar” for the evening show, the first named offering having signally failed to please. ”The Demon in the Cellar” is a pretty crude collection of rough knockabout comedy material, made universally familiar on our shores by the Hanlon Brothers’ ”Fantasma” and countless other pieces of the same sort. The Lucks have nothing to add to this style of humor as we know it on this side of the water. The inflated bladder, seltzer syphon and slapstick have been relegated to obscurity and long since thrown out of burlesque over here, and only our visiting British cousins have the courage to bring them forth again. The sketch tells the story of a wicked uncle, who seeks to cheat his nephew of a fortune by means of a false will. The nephew dons a horned mask and red tights and haunts the old man into confession. The comedy comes from the clowning of a French waiter and an English soldier (Shaun Glenville Luck), who comes a-courting the uncle’s house-maid, and are terrified by the appearance of the horned apparition. Shaun Glenville Luck makes a capital grotesque comedian and might, under more kindly circumstances, be really funny, but the seltzer-bottle-bladder-slapstick mess that makes up ”The Demon in the Cellar” leaves him stranded. The audience hopes for a minute that the introduction of acrobatics of some sort might enliven the proceedings, but they hoped in vain. It was just childish horseplay and buffoonery, almost without a redeeming virtue. (Rush, ‘New Acts of the Week,’ Variety, New York, 2 November 1907, p. 10b)

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December 27, 2012

The Six Brothers Luck (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century), British music hall entertainers, burlesque and sketch artists

‘THE SIX BROTHERS LUCK Burlesque and Sketch Artistes, In their enormously successful, Up-to-date Farcical Stketch, “THE DEMON OF THE CELLAR and many other eccentric Variety Acts. QUAINTNESS, HUMOUR, ORIGINALITY. ECCENTRICITY, NOVELTY, REFINEMENT. Sole Agents – GEORGE WARE & SON.’ (photo: unknown; advertisement from Charles Douglas Stuart and A.J. Park, The Variety Stage, T. Fisher Unwin, London, 1895)

‘Negotiations were completed yesterday for the appearance on the Klaw & Erlanger circuit of the six brothers Luck, English comedians. There are twenty-five persons in the company, and the six brothers Luck are the principal comedians; Ernest Luck, the star comedian of the organizations, is manager for Miss Hetty King [Mrs Ernie Lotinga, whose husband was a member of the Six Brothers Luck], who is now appearing at the New York Theatre.’ (The New York Times, New York, Tuesday, 8 October 1907, p. 5d)

‘Six Brothers Luck, ’’The Demon in the Cellar” (Pantomime). 20 Mins.; Full Stage (Special Set). New York.

‘The Six Brothers Luck are the latest Klaw & Erlanger European importation. They opened Monday afternoon in “A Night in an English Cafe,” but changed to “The Demon in the Cellar” for the evening show, the first named offering having signally failed to please. “The Demon in the Cellar” is a pretty crude collection of rough knockabout comedy material, made universally familiar on our shores by the Hanlon Brothers’ “Fantasma” and countless other pieces of the same sort. The Lucks have nothing to add to this style of humor as we know it on this side of the water. The inflated bladder, seltzer syphon and slapstick have been relegated to obscurity and long since thrown out of burlesque over here, and only our visiting British cousins have the courage to bring them forth again. The sketch tells the story of a wicked uncle, who seeks to cheat his nephew of a fortune by means of a false will. The nephew dons a horned mask and red tights and haunts the old man into confession. The comedy comes from the clowning of a French waiter and an English soldier (Shaun Glenville Luck), who comes a-courting the uncle’s house-maid, and are terrified by the appearance of the horned apparition. Shaun Glenville Luck makes a capital grotesque comedian and might, under more kindly circumstances, be really funny, but the seltzer-bottle-bladder-slapstick mess that makes up “The Demon in the Cellar” leaves him stranded. The audience hopes for a minute that the introduction of acrobatics of some sort might enliven the proceedings, but they hoped in vain. It was just childish horseplay and buffoonery, almost without a redeeming virtue. (Rush, ‘New Acts of the Week,’ Variety, New York, 2 November 1907, p. 10b)