Posts Tagged ‘His Majesty’s Theatre (London)’

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Chu-Chin-Chow, New York, 1916

May 31, 2015

The cover of the ‘Souvenir and Story of the Play’ for the New York production of Oscar Asche’s Chu-Chin-Chow, a ‘Musical Tale of the East,’ which was produced at the Manhattan Opera House, New York, on 22 October 1917, transferring to the Century Theatre, New York, on 14 January 1918. After a total of 208 performances the production went on a United States tour.
(‘Designed, Engraved and Printed by The Sackett & Wilhelms Corporation, New York,’ 1917)

The original London production of Chu-Chin-Chow, was produced at His Majesty’s Theatre on 31 August 1916 and ran until 22 July 1921, a total of 2238 performances. The leading roles of Abu Hasan and Zahrat Al-Kulub were first played in London respectively by Oscar Ashe (1871-1936) and his wife, Lily Brayton (1876-1953). In New York those parts were taken by Tyrone Power senior (1869-1931) and Florence Reed (1883-1967).

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Phyllis Dare in Edgar Wallace’s The Yellow Mask, London, 1928

October 6, 2014

Phyllis Dare (1890-1975), English star of musical comedy, as she appeared in EdgarWallace‘s musical comedy drama, The Yellow Mask, which was first seen at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham, 5 November 1927 before opening at the Carlton Theatre, London, on 8 February 1928. The production was subsequently transferred to His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 26 March 1928 and then to the London Palladium, 25 June 1928. Other leading members of the cast were Bobby Howes, Malcom Keen and Winnie Collins.
(photo: Stage Photo Co, London, 1928)

‘The ”leading lady” in The Yellow Mask is Miss Phyllis Dare and of its type her dancing is a joy to watch. Her movements are so controlled and graceful and there is such a wealth of meaning in the play of her hands and arms. I do not know at all where Miss Dare had her original dancing lessons, but I am confident that at some time or other she must have been well grounded in the simple technique of the ballet.’
(The Dancing Times, London, August 1928, pp. 487 and 488)

In 1930 The Yellow Mask was adapted for the cinema, starring Lupino Lane and Dorothy Seacombe, with Winnie Collins in her original part of Molly.

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February 8, 2014

Mab Paul (1873/83?-?; active 1900-1916), English actress
(photo: Albert Sachs, Bradford, circa 1905)

Mab Paul appears to have begun her career as a dancer in musical comedy and pantomime, appearing during 1900 in a tour of My Girl headed by John Le Hay, and at the Opera House, Crouch End, north London, during the Christmas season of 1900 in the pantomime Babes in the Wood. She subsequently played the part of Melantho in Stephen Phillips’s poetic drama, Ulysses, with Herbert Beerbohm Tree in the title role, at Her Majesty’s Theatre, London, produced on 1 February 1902. In April 1903 Miss Paul appeared in the small part of Marozia in Sir Henry Irving’s English production at Drury Lane of Dante after Sardou and Moreau’s original play. She accompanied Irving’s company in the same piece, opening for a three week season at the Broadway Theatre, New York City, on 26 October that year. Following a short tour the company returned to England in March 1904. After that Miss Paul spend some years on to tour the United Kingdom and then, at the beginning of 1910, she went to Australia where she continued her career until about 1916.

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Mab Paul in Sydney, Australia, October 1910, during a tour of Australia with George Willoughby’s English Farcical Comedy Company
‘ASSAULT ON AN ACTRESS.
‘Miss Mab Paul Attacked.
‘Her Assailant Worsted.
‘An attack upon Miss Mab Paul, leading lady of the George Willoughby Night of the Party Company, was made by an unknown man at the North Shore on Thursday night. Fortunately she was able to defend herself, and her assailant was the chief sufferer.
‘Miss Paul travelled by the 11.30 p.m. boat from town, and on arrival at the northern shore decided to walk to her quarters at Beulah flats. Within a few hundred yards of her destination she was set upon by a footpad, who caught her by both arms and endeavoured to snatch her handbag. Miss Paul, who is just over six feet, and something of an athlete, finding herself in the grip of the man, made a determined effort and kicked him hard upon the shin. He let go his hold, whereupon the actress hit him across the face with her handbag. Her assailant staggered back. Miss Paul then dropped the gag, and, clenching her fists, struck the man twice. The first blow glanced off, and her left hand grazed along a wall, causing a painful wound. The second blow was more effective, catching the footpad full upon the point of the jaw, and causing his downfall. As he fell Miss Paul recovered her bag and hurried home.
‘A sympathetic public gave her a rousing reception in The Night of the Party last night, when she appeared [at the Criterion Theatre, Sydney] with her hand in bandages.’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 October 1910, p. 14b)

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Mab Paul, English actress

February 8, 2014

Mab Paul (1873/83?-?; active 1900-1916), English actress
(photo: Albert Sachs, Bradford, circa 1905)

Mab Paul appears to have begun her career as a dancer in musical comedy and pantomime, appearing during 1900 in a tour of My Girl headed by John Le Hay, and at the Opera House, Crouch End, north London, during the Christmas season of 1900 in the pantomime Babes in the Wood. She subsequently played the part of Melantho in Stephen Phillips’s poetic drama, Ulysses, with Herbert Beerbohm Tree in the title role, at Her Majesty’s Theatre, London, produced on 1 February 1902. In April 1903 Miss Paul appeared in the small part of Marozia in Sir Henry Irving’s English production at Drury Lane of Dante after Sardou and Moreau’s original play. She accompanied Irving’s company in the same piece, opening for a three week season at the Broadway Theatre, New York City, on 26 October that year. Following a short tour the company returned to England in March 1904. After that Miss Paul spend some years on to tour the United Kingdom and then, at the beginning of 1910, she went to Australia where she continued her career until about 1916.

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Mab Paul in Sydney, Australia, October 1910, during a tour of Australia with George Willoughby’s English Farcical Comedy Company
‘ASSAULT ON AN ACTRESS.
‘Miss Mab Paul Attacked.
‘Her Assailant Worsted.
‘An attack upon Miss Mab Paul, leading lady of the George Willoughby Night of the Party Company, was made by an unknown man at the North Shore on Thursday night. Fortunately she was able to defend herself, and her assailant was the chief sufferer.
‘Miss Paul travelled by the 11.30 p.m. boat from town, and on arrival at the northern shore decided to walk to her quarters at Beulah flats. Within a few hundred yards of her destination she was set upon by a footpad, who caught her by both arms and endeavoured to snatch her handbag. Miss Paul, who is just over six feet, and something of an athlete, finding herself in the grip of the man, made a determined effort and kicked him hard upon the shin. He let go his hold, whereupon the actress hit him across the face with her handbag. Her assailant staggered back. Miss Paul then dropped the gag, and, clenching her fists, struck the man twice. The first blow glanced off, and her left hand grazed along a wall, causing a painful wound. The second blow was more effective, catching the footpad full upon the point of the jaw, and causing his downfall. As he fell Miss Paul recovered her bag and hurried home.
‘A sympathetic public gave her a rousing reception in The Night of the Party last night, when she appeared [at the Criterion Theatre, Sydney] with her hand in bandages.’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 October 1910, p. 14b)

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Constance Collier and Herbert Beerbohm Tree in Oliver Twist, His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 1905

October 1, 2013

Constance Collier (1878-1955), English actress, and Herbert Beerbohm Tree (1852-1917), English actor manager, as they appeared as Nancy and Fagin in Tree’s production of Oliver Twist, adapted from Charles Dickens’s novel by Comyns Carr and first presented at His Majesty’s Theatre, London, on 10 July 1905.
(photo: F.W. Burford, London, 1905; postcard no. 354.G published by J. Beagles & Co, London, 1905)

‘HIS MAJESTY’S : OLIVER TWIST
‘Mr. Tree has been as good as his word. Saying good-bye for the summer on July 10 [1905], he expressed his satisfaction with the launch of Oliver Twist, and promised a prolonged revival for September 4. On that evening the favourable verdict of the former first-night tribunal was not only confirmed, but it is said that the reception beats all records of His Majesty’s Theatre. In our issue of July 16 the artistic merits of the case have been fully discussed, and while due praise was given to the adapter for his skill, a note of protest was sounded against the very painful and over-emphasised scene of Nancy’s murder and the prominence given to the character of Fagin. I see that in other papers some critics and some voices from the public have joined chorus in the objection to the murder episode, and it is to be hoped that something will be done to tone down the gruesome effect. Whether Oliver Twist be a good play or not, it is bound to attract all who have read and still love their Dickens, and for this reason in particular it would be desirable not to dwell upon the gruesome side of the story. Under all circumstances there is enough of the sensational in the play, and some consideration should be shown to the nerves of the weaker sex. With Mr. Tree in his versatile performance of Fagin, and the remarkable impersonations of Miss Constance Collier as Nancy and Mr. Lyn Harding as Bill Sykes, the acting alone is well worth a visit to the theatre… .
(J.T. Grein, Sunday Times, London, Sunday, 10 September 1905, p. 2c)

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Phyllis Neilson-Terry as Queen Elizabeth, 1912

August 15, 2013

Phyllis Neilson-Terry as Queen Elizabeth in Louis N. Parker’s Drake, His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 3 September 1912
(photo: Daily Mirror Studios, London, 1912)

Louis N. Parker’s pageant play, Drake, produced by the author and Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, opened at His Majesty’s Theatre, London, on 3 September 1912. The cast was headed by Lyn Harding in the title role, Amy Brandon-Thomas as Elizabeth Sydenham and Phyllis Neilson-Terry as Queen Elizabeth, Herbert Waring as John Doughty and Philip Merivale as Thomas Doughty. During the play’s 221 performance run the part of Drake was also played by Frederick Ross, Harding’s understudy. The costumes, designed by Seymour Lucas, were supplied by B.J. Simmons and L. & H. Nathan.

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Lily Brayton and Oscar Asche in Atilla

May 29, 2013

Lily Brayton (1876-1953) as Ildico and Oscar Asche (1871-1936) as Atilla in Laurence Binyon’s poetical tragedy Atilla, produced at His Majesty’s Theatre, London, on 4 September 1907
(photo: Daily Mirror Studios, London, 1907)

This real photograph postcard, no. 4030 O in the Rotary Photographic Series, issued in 1907 by The Rotary Photographic Co of London, shows Lily Brayton and Oscar Asche in the leading roles of Atilla, Laurence Binyon’s four act poetical tragedy, which was sumptuously produced at His Majesty’s Theatre, London, on 4 September 1907. Although Asche subsequently took Atilla on tour it was among the least successful of his productions, the original run having survived for only 32 performances. Other members of the cast included Godfrey Tearle, J. Fisher White, R. Ian Penny, Gordon Harker, Mary Rorke and Irene Rooke.