Posts Tagged ‘Isabel Jay’

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Isabel Jay responds ‘with pleasure’ to a request for her autograph, 1908

August 30, 2014

Isabel Jay (1879-1927), English singer and actress, with her daughter, Cecilia Claribel Cavendish (1903-1997), by her first husband, Henry Sheppard Hart Cavendish (1876-1948), who succeeded to the barony of Waterpark of Waterpark, co. Cork, in 1932.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, probably 1908; Rotary Photographic Series postcard, no. 4748 E, issued by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1908)

The sender and ultimate recipient of this postcard, postmarked 22 [? August] 1908, wrote to Isabel Jay the following message: ‘Dear Madam As I am making a collection of actresses autographs, & should like to have yours among them, I should be very much obliged if you would sign this card. Hoping I am not troubling you too much, I remain, yrs truly, V.A. Shore.’ The sender was Miss V.A. Shore of 284 Goldhawk Road, Shepherds Bush, London, W.

Miss V.A. Shore was Violet Ada Shore who was born in Hammersmith on 7 July 1890, the daughter of Arthur Miers Shore (1862-1944), a professor of music, and his wife, Ada Alice Shore (née Clark), who were then living at 14 Dewhurst Road, West Kensington Park. She was baptised at St. Barnabas, Kensington, on 27 August 1890. At the time of the 1911 Census she was described as an art student (painting) and living with her parents and brother, Bernard A.R. Shore, at 284 Goldhawk Road, Hammersmith, London, W. Miss Shore, who was never married, died at Hove, Sussex, in 1977.

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Ellen Beach Yaw, American coloratura soprano, appears in London in the 1890s

January 13, 2014

Ellen Beach Yaw (1869-1947), American coloratura soprano
(photo: Sarony, New York, circa 1906)

‘A new American soprano, Miss Ellen Beach Yaw, has arrived in London. She has just finished a tour in the Great Republic after singing at one hundred and thirty concerts. Her compass is extraordinary, extending to three octaves, and American critics say Miss Yaw can ”go one butter” in the matter of top notes then any European soprano. Miss yaw states that she has come to study composition in London; but it is certain that, if her voice is as wonderful as reported, she will soon be heard in our concert rooms.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 6 July 1895, p. 9a)

‘Miss Ellen Beach Yaw, the ”record” high soprano of California, is in London, and Mr. Adlington is arranging some appearances for her. Miss Yaw claims to have a voice which reaches to E in altissimo, and it is hoped that those who hear it will be able to recognise the note. The highest recorded soprano note is, we believe, the C in altissimo, which Mozart heard Lucrezia Agujari sing at Parma in 1770. Mozart admits that this distinguished lady, who was then twenty-seven years old, has ”an incredibly high range.” Agujari just 113 years ago received for singing two songs at the Pantheon the then almost unheard-of fee of 100£. a night. A modern foreign prima donna would scarcely be able to support life upon starvation wage.’
(The Daily News, London, Friday, 9 November 1897, p. 6f)

The Grand Scottish Festival, Albert Hall, London, Wednesday, 31 November 1898
‘Miss Ellen Beach Yaw was much applauded after her delivery of Alabieff’s ”Russian Nightingale,” a song which suited her to perfection and enabled her to display her beautiful high notes to the best advantage.’
(The Morning Post, London, Thursday, 1 December 1898, p. 6f)

The Rose of Persia, comic opera, produced at the Savoy Theatre, London, Wednesday, 29 November 1899
‘There are several new and welcome additions to the [Savoy Theatre] cast, and amongst them Miss Ellen Beach Yaw, who is the possessor of an exceptionally fine soprano voice, over which she has wonderful command. Her rendering of ”Neath my lattice” quite captivated the audience, who listened in breathless silence.’
(The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Bristol, Thursday, 30 November 1899, p. 8e)

‘THE NEW OPERA AT THE SAVOY … the Sultana herself [in The Rose of Persia] is embodied by Miss Ellen Beach Yaw in a graceful if amateurish manner. This last-named lady is known to concert-goers by the exceptionally high compass of her voice, and these notes the composer [Sir Arthur Sullivan] has effectively provided for.’
(The Standard, London, Thursday, 30 November 1899, p. 5f)

‘An important change has been made in the cast of the Sullivan-Hood Savoy opera. The leading soprano, Miss Ellen Beach Yaw, whose top register has been the despair of every possible vocal rival, and whose extremely slender physique must have been remarked by everybody who saw her on the first night, has found herself compelled, for purely physical reasons, to abandon her part fro an indefinite period of time. She has been succeeded as Rose-in-bloon by Miss Isabel Jay, a really charming high soprano, for whom Sir Arthur Sullivan has made the one or two absolutely necessary alterations that such change entailed.’

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Ellen Beach Yaw made a number of recordings, including a rendition of her own composition ”The Skylark, which she cut for Edison (Diamond Disc 82049) in New York City on 10 April 1913.

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Ellaline Terriss, Seymour Hicks and Baby Betty

April 10, 2013

Actresseses photographed with their children.

Seymour Hicks (1871-1949) and his wife, Ellaline Terriss (1871-1971) and their daughter Betty (b. 1907), who was widely known as ‘Baby Betty’ and later professionally as Betty Seymour Hicks.
Postcard 4051 B in the Rotary Photographic Series, published in 1908 by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1908)

‘London, Sept. 21 [1910].
‘The latest fashion among English actresses is to be photographed with their children. The family life of English theatrical people has always been of interest to the British public, and the new postcards and photographs of actresses holding their children in their arms or on their knees have sold better than any other pictures of the same gifted yet domesticated ladies.

Muriel Beaumont

Muriel Beaumont (Mrs Gerald Du Maurier, 1881-1957) and two of her daughters, Angela (1904-2002) and Daphne (1907-1989), both of whom became well known writers.
Postcard E 1927, published by the Aristophot Co Ltd, London, 1908.
(photo: Rita Martin, London, 1908)

‘It seems to please theatregoers to know that the leading lady of the company is in private life a good mother and excellent housewife, and they give her an extra round of applause for these qualities. Middle-class England does not believe in the artistic temperament, and any little idiosyncrasies in the private affairs of actresses meet with disapproval. Domesticity is the drawing card. the knowledge that a stage favorite is comfortably settled in her own home with a devoted husband and one or two future actors learning their lessons at her knee is unction to the British matron’s soul.
‘Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Hicks lead in public favor as examples of domestic theatrical life. The public knows their ménage intimately, and takes a tremendous interest in Baby Betty, the little daughter of the household. Both Mr. Hicks and his wife, Ellaline Terriss, take the audience into their confidence, and in the course of a musical comedy they have been known to mention Baby Betty and the stage of her health or the fact that she sent her love to everybody, and such announcements are received with cheers of delight.
‘Betty once wrote an ode which was published. She is just 5 now. If no news of the child is forthcoming admirers have been known to call out from the depths of the pit and inquire for the latest news. Naturally, Mr. and Mrs. Hicks have been photographed with Betty countless times, and their pictures in plush frames adorn many British homes.
‘Mr. and Mrs. Gerald du Maurier are another couple in whom great interest is taken. On the stage Mrs. du Maurier is Miss Muriel Beaumont. She rarely acts now, as home interests are engrossing. Her little daughter Angela is 4, and promises to be a real Du Maurier in appearance as well as in ways. she has not yet any stage aspirations.

Isabel Jay

Isabel Jay (Mrs Henry Sheppard Hart Cavendish, 1879-1927) and her daughter Cecilia Claribel (1903 – 1963) in their Spyker car.
Postcard 4846B in the Rotary Photographic Series, published about 1907 by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, circa 1907)

‘Mr. and Mrs. Fred Terry, who are soon to appear in America, are very proud of their tall daughter, who has just made her debut in Priscilla Runs Away. She calls herself Miss Neilson-Terry, but is known to her intimates as Phillida. Though she is taller than her mother, and very well developed, she is only 17. She is very pretty. At present the post card shops are filled with a variety of pictures of the Fred Terry family.
‘Miss Maie Ash, who married Stanley Brett, a brother of Seymour Hicks, a year or so ago, is the proud mother of a very recent baby and she has lost no time in being pictured with her little son. Miss Ash was one of the prettiest of the pretty girls in Mr. Hicks’ company, and was a musical comedy favorite. Just now she is playing a sketch with her husband.
‘Miss Eva Moore, who is Mrs. H. Esmond in private life, has two children, and is a devoted mother. Her stage career takes her from her family a good deal, as she is in demand to create parts in her husband’s plays as well as others, but she has her children with her all she can. The Moore family of girls, five of them, is a type of a theatrical family often found in England. Every Miss Moore went on the stage when she arrived at years of discretion, and two of them, Miss Eva and Miss Decima Moore have become successful actresses.
‘Miss Violet Vanbrugh and her husband, Arthur Bourchier, are having a difficult time to persuade their daughter Prudence that 12 is not the proper age to begin a stage career. Prudence has had dramatic aspirations since she was little more than a baby, and Mr. Bourchier confesses that before long she is likely to get her way and appear at his theater in a Christmas play.
‘Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Maude are another couple in whom the public is interested here, and though their one child, Winifred, is seldom seen on post cards or photographs, her clever sayings and doings are well known, and her debut is looked forward to.
‘Miss Nancy Price, who for years has played adventuress parts in risky French gowns and red wigs, is really, to the joy of her audiences, a model wife and mother. She, too, has a small daughter, who is kept carefully from the glare of the footlights out in the suburban home where Miss Price makes her way after the fatigues of Drury Lane performances.

Ellaline Terriss

Ellaline Terriss and her daughter ‘Baby Betty.’
Postcard 11706 C in the Rotary Photographic Series, published in 1911 by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1911)

‘Mrs. G.P. Huntley’s small boy [Timothy] has seen his father act very often, but not his mother, as for the last few years she [Eva Kelly] has seldom appeared on the stage.
‘Mr. and Mrs. H.B. Irving have a daughter very like her mother [Dorothea Baird], with silky flaxen hair and blue eyes. She dances prettily, and can recite yards of poetry.
Mrs. Kendal, who used to be regarded as an example of theatrical motherhood, seems to have dropped out in recent years. One sees no pictures of her with her children, who are grown now.
‘Miss Ellen Terry is probably the most devoted mother in the theatrical world, yet she is never pictured with her son or daughter. She has never figures before the public in the role of mother, but those who know say that her devotion to her children [Edward Gordon Craig, and Edith Craig] is the greatest thing in her life. She has started both of them several times in various careers in which they wished to embark, and she is always the kind friend to whom they go in their difficulties. to see Miss Terry and Miss Edith Craig, her daughter together is to realize the strong bond between them.
‘Miss Annie Hughes, whose forte is playing the part of catty, sneaky, little ladies of the Country Mouse variety, has a son, who is her special joy and pride.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 2 October 1910, Miscellany Section, p.10b-g)

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Miss Hook of Holland

April 6, 2013

a poster for George Dance’s UK touring company production of Paul Rubens’s successful ‘Dutch Musical Incident,’ Miss Hook of Holland, starring Marie Studholme as Sally, the part originated by Isabel Jay when the piece was first produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 31 January 1907
(printed and published by David Allen & Sons Ltd, London and Belfast, 1907)

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Bertram Wallis

March 2, 2013

a Rotary Photographic Co Ltd real photograph postcard (Rotary Photographic Series no. 2387 O) of
Bertram Wallis (1874-1952), English actor and singer, as Conrad Petersen
in Paul Rubens’s ‘Danish Musical Incident,’ Dear Little Denmark,
which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 1 September 1909.
Mr Wallis’s leading lady in this production was Isabel Jay.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

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The Four Amaranths, acrobatic dancers

January 18, 2013

the Four Amaranths
(Mary, Tina, Jennie and Hannah, fl. early 20th Century),
acrobatic dancers (photo: unknown, circa 1915)

This hand tinted real photograph postcard, photographer and publisher uncredited, dates from about 1910. For reference to the Four Amaranths’ appearances in New York between 1915 and 1920, see the Internet Broadway Database.

‘FOUR AMARANTHS
‘A quartette of graceful lady acrobatic dancers. Some act.’
(The Wisconsin State Journal, Madison, Wisconsin, 23 February 1915, p. 6f, advertisement)

Keith’s, Philadelphia, PA, week beginning 23 April 1917
‘… The pretty dancing turn of Hooper and Marbury got something more than usual in the opening position. Both are good dancers, and pretty stage setting and costuming help get the act over in good shape. A dancing act of another kind – that of the Four Amaranths, who mix acrobatics with their stopping, closed the vaudeville bill, and the girls did very well without showing anything new.’
(Variety, New York, Friday, 27 April 1917, pp. 48D/49a)

The Amaranths troupe was originally composed of three sisters, known as the Three Amaranths (otherwise the Sisters Amaranth). They appeared in the musical play, The Cingalee; or, Sunny Ceylon, which was produced at Daly’s Theatre, London, on 5 March 1904. Their Perahara Dances were intended to enrich the exotic setting of the piece. ‘One of the most striking features in The Cingalee is the devil dancing by the Sisters Amaranth, who were greatly applauded by the Queen [Alexandra] on the first night.’ Other members of the cast included Hayden Coffin, Rutland Barrington, Fred Kaye, Huntley Wright, Sybil Arundale, Gracie Leigh, Carrie Moore and Isabel Jay, together with the dancers Loku Banda, Willie Warde and Topsy Sinden.