Posts Tagged ‘J. Garratt (photographer)’

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Alice Waldie, Welsh-born concert party entertainer

December 8, 2014

Alice Waldie (née Florence May B. Bond, 1886-1937), LRAM, Welsh-born soprano/mezzo soprano and entertainer, was long associated with Will Gane (1880-1957) and his P.P and P. Concert Party (Pierrot, Piano, and Pierrette), ‘a feast of fun and harmony.’
(postcard photo: J. Garratt, 115 North Street, Leeds, Yorkshire, circa 1914)

William James Gane married his first wife, Matilda Louisa Kinnaird, an actress, in 1907, by whom he had three children. Following her death in 1931 he married Alice Waldie in 1933.

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December 8, 2014

Alice Waldie (née Florence May B. Bond, 1886-1937), LRAM, Welsh-born soprano/mezzo soprano and entertainer, was long associated with Will Gane (1880-1957) and his P.P and P. Concert Party (Pierrot, Piano, and Pierrette), ‘a feast of fun and harmony.’
(postcard photo: J. Garratt, 115 North Street, Leeds, Yorkshire, circa 1914)

William James Gane married his first wife, Matilda Louisa Kinnaird, an actress, in 1907, by whom he had three children. Following her death in 1931 he married Alice Waldie in 1933.

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Gladys Saqui, Australian-born dancer in the pantomime Aladdin, Grand Theatre, Leeds, Christmas 1907

March 23, 2014

Gladys Saqui (1884-1919), Australian-born dancer, as she appeared as Nicee in the pantomime Aladdin, produced at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, at Christmas 1907. The principal parts in this production were played by Constance Hyem (Aladdin), Nell Emerald (Brigette), Frank Danby (Widow Trankey) and J.F. McArdle (Abanazar). The cast also included Hebe Bliss, G.H. Elliott and Olive Crellin.
(photo; J. Garratt, Leeds, 1907)

Gladys Mignon Saqui was born in Australia in 1884, one of the children of John ‘Jack’ Isaac Saqui (1855-1916), a cigar manufacturer and bookmaker, and his wife Esther (Stella) (née Barnett, 1852?-1946), who were both born in London’s East End and married in 1878. Two of Gladys’s sisters, Maie (1880-1907) and Hazel (1887-1975) were also actresses; the former was married in 1903 as his first wife to Arthur Hope Travers (1875-1938), a Grenadier Guardsman, and the latter was married in 1908 to the well-known actor manager, Nelson Keys (1886-1939). Maie and Gladys Saqui made professional appearances in their native Australia and once in England all three sisters were sometime under contract to George Edwardes. Maie first appeared in London in The Geisha (Daly’s Theatre, 25 April 1896 – 28 May 1898) towards the end of its run. Gladys Saqui appeared on tour and also as a dancer in The New Aladdin (Gaiety Theatre, London, 29 September 1907) and The Belle of Britanny (Queen’s Theatre, London, 24 October 1908).

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‘Miss Maie Saqui, the famous Gaiety girl, whose death is announced this week, belonged to a sporting family. Her grandfather, Austen Saqui [Abraham Austin Saqui (1834-1889)], was a well-known bookmaker and owner of racehorses in Australia. Her father, Jack Saqui, followed in his father’s footsteps as a penciller, and began at the early age of 14 years. At the age of 20 he was making books on the Melbourne Cup to the extent of £1,000. About the same time he married. His daughter Maie was trained as a dancer under her aunt, Mrs. [Julia] Green, the well-known teacher of dancing in Melbourne, who was originally a Miss Saqui. Maie was not intended for the stage, but when her father, a wealthy man, lost his money in the land boom, Mrs. Saqui brought her daughter to England, where her brilliant career is known to every one. During more recent years Miss Saqui retired, and left the stage, and although in delicate healthy for some time past, her death came as a great shock to her numerous friends and relatives, among whom is Miss Sadi Green, now married to a son of Mr. Purves, the Melbourne barrister, and residing in England.’
(The Register, Adelaide, South Australia, Saturday, 11 May 1907, p. 4e)

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Gladys Ivery

May 10, 2013

Gladys Ivery (fl. early 20th Century), English actress and singer
(photo: J. Garratt, Leeds, circa 1907)

Gladys Ivery heads the cast in the musical comedy The Purple Emperor, King’s Theatre, Hammersmith, 6 December 1909
‘Mr. Tristam Crutchley has taken for the theme of his new musical comedy the meteoric career of the Emperor of the Sahara, and under the title of The Purple Emperor, it was produced at the King’s Theatre, Hammersmith, last week. The story told is amusing enough, and the music to which it is wedded shows that the composer, Mr. Harold Austin, has a decided gift of melody and an ingenious talent for dainty and agreeable orchestration. Some of the lyrics are delightfully original and unhackneyed. Decidedly Mr. Austin will again be heard of in the musical world. The company engaged in the service of The Purple Emperor wad distinctly clever. Miss Gladys Ivery, a pretty girl with a soprano voice that, though a little metallic in quality, is genuinely brilliant and effective, playing Christine Carlingford, remarkably well. Miss Winnie Browne was also attractive as “a lady journalist,” and Miss Maie Sydney made a pretty little midshipmite. Mr. Roland Bottomley was the lover-hero of the production, and as Lieutenant Robert Kestrain, R.N., sang admirably and acted with spirit. Constantine Jakes, the “Purple Emperor,” was amusingly played by Mr. Charles McNaughton, and the other members of a large company were all excellent in their various characters.
(A.M.I., The Lady, London, Thursday, 16 December 1909, p.1154b)