Posts Tagged ‘Katie Seymour’

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Edmund Payne and Katie Seymour as they appeared for the ‘Mummy Dance’ in The Messenger Boy, Gaiety Theatre, London, 1900

May 6, 2014

Edmund Payne (1863-1914), English musical comedy actor, and Katie Seymour (1870-1903), English actress, dancer and singer, as they appeared in the musical play, The Messenger Boy (Gaiety Theatre, London, 3 February 1900) for the ‘Mummy Dance.’
(photo: Alfred Ellis & Walery, London, 1900)

The ‘Mummy Dance,’ twice encored on the opening night of The Messenger Boy, proved to be one of that popular show’s most popular items.

‘Of the performers, Mr. Edmund Payne was in every way admirable as the messenger boy, in his dervish disguise, indeed, he was inimitably funny; and he danced as he only can dance. Miss Katie Seymour danced once more with wonderful skill and facility. Her method possibly lacks emotion; she has been well compared to a gnat in her absolutely versatile effects; she has a foot scare on the ground before it is off.’
(The Pall Mall Gazette, London, Monday, 5 February 1900, p. 3b)

The ‘Mummy Dance’ proved such a success that it was included by Mr Payne and Miss Seymour in two charity matinees at Drury Lane Theatre: the first on 15 May 1900 in aid of Princess Christian’s Homes of Rest for Disabled Soldiers, the second on 18 June 1900 in aid of the Ottawa Fire Fund and the Canadian Patriotic Fund Association.

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Katie Seymour sings ‘In Disguise (The Masquerade Song’ in The Casino Girl, Knickerbocker Theatre, New York, 1901

April 13, 2014

Katie Seymour (1870-1903), English actress, dancer and singer, featured on a lithograph poster advertising the New York Journal for Sunday, 21 April 1901, in which copies were included of ‘In Disguise (The Masquerade Song),’ which, as Dolly Twinkle, she sang in The Casino Girl at the Knickerbocker Theatre, New York, in April and May 1901.

‘Knickerbocker Theatre (Harry Mann, manager). – The rather mildly entertaining and only fairly creditable American product, The Casino Girl, returned to this [New York] the city of its original production, after having been Angelicised [sic] to some extent. The house on the opening night, April 8 [1901], was crowded in all parts, and, thought there is little genuine humor in the book and lyrics, the play’s spectacular features and several musical contributions were hailed as sufficient compensation for a visit to the house, and the evening was successful. James E. Sullivan suffered from a lame dialect, but was otherwise capable, and Katie Seymour danced gracefully and made a distinct hit. Albert Hart and Sam Collins, in their original roles, proved as nimble and as clever as formerly, while Ella Snyder made a pleasing exponent of the title role. Charles Dox contrived to do some creditable work, and the others of the cast made the most of their opportunities… .’
(The New York Clipper, New York, 13 April 1901, Saturday, 148c)

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Blanche Astley and James T. Powers in The Circus Girl

July 12, 2013

Blanche Astley and James T. Powers as they appeared in the Fancy Dress Ball scene in The Circus Girl, which opened at Daly’s Theatre, New York, on 23 April 1897
(photo: unknown, New York, 1897)

The Circus Girl, a musical comedy with music by Ivan Caryll, first opened at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 5 December 1896. The original cast included Edmund Payne as Biggs and Katie Seymour as Lucille (a slack wire walker); these parts were played respectively by James T. Powers and Blanche Astley when the American production opened at Daly’s, New York, on 23 April 1897.

Daly’s Theatre, New York
‘Rehearsals are held daily of ”The Circus Girl,” which is to be produced April 26 [sic]. Virginia Earle will appear as the Circus girl, and Blanche Astley, who was specially brought over from England by Mr. Daly, will act the role of the bareback rider and dancer. Miss Astley is said to be one of the most graceful dancers on the English stage. James T. Powers, the comedian, has been engaged as a member of Mr. Daly’s stock company, and will act wht role of the American bartender in the new piece.’
(Boston Evening Transcript, Boston, Saturday,17 April 1897, [p. 19a])

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Blanche Astley and James T. Powers in The Circus Girl

June 18, 2013

Blanche Astley and James T. Powers in The Circus Girl, which opened at Daly’s Theatre, New York, on 23 April 1897
(photo: unknown, New York, 1897)

The Circus Girl, a musical comedy with music by Ivan Caryll, first opened at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 5 December 1896. The original cast included Edmund Payne as Biggs and Katie Seymour as Lucille (a slack wire walker); these parts were played respectively by James T. Powers and Blanche Astley when the American production opened at Daly’s, New York, on 23 April 1897.

Daly’s Theatre, New York
‘Rehearsals are held daily of ”The Circus Girl,” which is to be produced April 26 [sic]. Virginia Earle will appear as the Circus girl, and Blanche Astley, who was specially brought over from England by Mr. Daly, will act the role of the bareback rider and dancer. Miss Astley is said to be one of the most graceful dancers on the English stage. James T. Powers, the comedian, has been engaged as a member of Mr. Daly’s stock company, and will act wht role of the American bartender in the new piece.’
(Boston Evening Transcript, Boston, Saturday,17 April 1897, [p. 19a])

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Louise Montague

March 2, 2013

a carte de visit photograph of Louise Montague (1859-1910),
American actress and singer
(photo: Sarony, New York, circa 1883)

‘Miss Louise Montague, a member of the variety-theatre profession born in New York, aged 21, has been selected by Mr. Forepaugh as the winner of his prize of $10,000 for the handsomest woman in the country. In complexion she is a semi-brunette. Her lips are cherry, teeth regular and pearly, and visible at every smile through a large but not disproportionate mouth; has large expressive brown eyes, a symmetrical nose and an intelligent cast of countenance. In conversation – and she is possessed of a fund of sparkling talk – every feature if animated, and her flashing eyes and health-tinted cheeks, coupled with a vivacious manner, lend an additional charm to her demeanor. She is of medium height and figure and has a little foot.’
(The Lancaster Daily Intelligencer, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Monday, 4 April 1881, p. 2b/c)

New York, 29 April 1887.
‘Capt. Alfred Thompson and Joseph Brooks, composing the Imperial Burlesque Company, have been sued for [$]8500 by Miss Louise Montague, whom they had engaged for four weeks, commencing May 29th, and whom they discharged because she would not sing for them, so that they might judge of her vocal powers.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 14 May 1887, p. 15e)

‘Louise Montague, the $10,000 beauty, is making the hit of The Gondoliers in the company that is touring through the West [United States], and she makes it by high kicking. It was reported a year ago that she was studying for opera and it is evident that the report was true.’
(The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Sunday, 20 April 1890, p, 18g)

Don Juan [to be produced on 28 October 1893] at the Gaiety [London], is to have the services of Mr. Arthur Roberts, Mr. Robert Pateman, Mr. Arthur Playfair, Mr. Edmund Payne, Miss Millie Hylton, Miss Sylvia Grey, Miss Katie Seymour, Miss Cissie Loftus, and Miss Louise Montague, a young singer from America.’
(The Birmingham Daily Post, Birmingham, England, Monday, 18 September 1893, p. 6h)

‘LOUISE MONTAGUE DEAD.
‘Was Famous ”Ten Thousand Dollar Beauty” of Forepaugh’s Circus.
‘Louise M. Montague, once heralded over the country as the ”Ten Thousand Dollar Beauty,” died on Tuesday at her home, 164 Manhattan Avenue. Louise Montague was an actress with Edward E. Rice’s company in The Corsair, and later became a star of David Henderson’s Sinbad the Sailor.
‘Adam Forepaugh, the circus proprietor, determined to make her beauty the feature of his circus, and in 1878 he engaged her to travel with his circus. She was advertise as the ”Ten Thousand Dollar Beauty,” and rode in the parades in a gorgeous chariot especially constructed for her.’
(The New York Times, Thursday, 17 March 1910)

‘DEATH DRAWS VEIL ON $10,000 BEAUTY
‘Louise Montague, Who Captured the Big Beauty Prize Money, Dies.
‘NEW YORK March 16 [1910]. – ”Montague, Louise M., died on Tuesday at her residence, 184 Manhattan avenue.”
‘This simple death notice appeared in the New York papers today. It was written in the main by Louise Montague herself a week before her death, the day on which death would come being left blank, to be filled in by the undertaker.
‘Few who read this notice know that the Louise Montague, whose death was so simply chronicled, was the woman who was once heralded far and wide over the country as the ”Ten Thousand Dollar Beauty.”
‘After the first rage over her had subsided she sought the quiet of private life, but a few years afterwards went on the stage because it was discovered that she had talents equal to her beauty.
‘Then Forepaugh with a showman’s acumen, offered a $10,000 prize for the most beautiful woman in America and had the judges select Louise Montague. Riding on a gorgeous chariot she was a feature of his circus parades.
‘But just before she died she asked that all the old pictures of herself in the days of her fleeting glory be brought to her, and tonight they stood on the mantel and on chairs in the room where Louise Montague lay in her coffin. Pinned on the wall was a glaring, many-colored poster – ”Forepaugh’s prize beauty” – and over the mantel was a faded photograph, life size of Louise Montague as ”Sindbad the Sailor.”’
(Evening Bulletin, Honolulu, Friday, 1 April 1910, p. 10c/d)

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Millie Hylton, English actress and singer

January 3, 2013

a cabinet photograph of Millie Hylton (1870-1920), English actress and singer (photo: James Bacon & Sons, 81 Northumberland Street, Newcastle-on-Tyne, circa 1900)

Millie Hylton, Horace Mills, Lydia Flopp, Coralie Blythe et al on UK tour of The Circus Girl, August 1897

‘Considerable excitement was caused at the Portsmouth Town Station on Sunday last by the discovery that the chief baggage van of the special train conveying Mr George Edwardes’s Circus Girl company had caught fire through an over-heated axle. Expensive costumes were hurriedly thrown out on to the platform, and the principal properties were saved. The ladies were very much upset, and Miss Millie Hylton and [her sister] Miss Lydia Flopp both fainted. Messrs Page, Horace Mills, and Charles Stevens were conspicuous in their activity in saving the property of the company.’ (The Era, London, Saturday, 14 August 1897, p. 10b)

The Circus Girl touring company at the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, week beginning Monday, 9 August 1897

‘… Of the ladies Miss Millie Hylton invested the part of Mrs Drivelli [created by Connie Ediss when The Circus Girl was first produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 5 December 1896]with clever low comedy, speaking with a true cockney twang, though scarcely looked plump enough for the part, but always charming and refreshing, her song ”Oh, what a wet, wet day,” and ”The proper way to treat a lady” being vociferously redemanded. Miss Lydia Flopp as Dora Wemyss [created in the original production by Ellaline Terriss] was naïvely natural, and acted and sang delightfully, her ”Little bit of string” being a great favourite… . Miss Coralie Blythe delighted everyone with her fresh conception of the part of Lucille [a circus slack wire walker, created by Katie Seymour].’ (The Era, London, Saturday, 14 August 1897, p. 11d)

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Katie Seymour

December 24, 2012

Katie Seymour (1870-1903), English actress, dancer and singer (photo: Walery, London, circa 1890)

‘A New Deal in Vaudeville. On to-morrow evening, at the Baldwin Theatre, the much talked of Hermann Transatlantique Vaudeville Company will make its firs appearance in San Francisco. Peculiar interest attaches to this attraction; they have had a remarkable tour throughout the United States, and from all accounts deserve the attention that has been bestowed upon them. It is unquestionably a new departure in vaudeville business, and if the entertainment is what the announcements claim it is Professor Hermann is to be heartily commended. Appearances indicate that the attendance for their engagement here will be both large and fashionable. Such has been the result everywhere in the East, and the organization is appearing only in the leading legitimate theatrers of the country. The list of celebrities that go to make up the entertainment certainly warrant the belief that there is considerable merit in the company. The list is headed by the name of the indescribable Trewey, a clever Frenchman, who has become famous throughout Europe. Trewey hails from Angouleme, in the South of France, and seems to have arrived at the acme of manual dexterity. Column upon column has been devoted to his skill by Eastern papers, notably by the Scientific American, which devoted quite an extensive article to the illustration of the ”shadowgraph” act. His is an entirely new and original style of entertainment, and is said to be as delicately artistic as anything that has ever been presented in a theater. His versatility is almost unbounded; he is a mimic, a prestidigitator, a natural-born comedian, and the quasi discoverer of the latent beauties of shadow-graphing. We will know more about him after to-morrow night. A familiar name on the list is that of Gus Williams, who needs no introduction to our theater-goers. His peculiar talents are well known here, and in certain branches of the comic art he is quite inimitable. John T. Kelly, a monologue comedian, and Ross and Fenton, sketch artists, complete the American portion of the programme. A clever act is that of the Athois, who are from the Empire Theater, London. Under the title of ”The Spider and the Fly” they go through a very ingenious acrobatic performance on a huge web which is stretched upon the stage. A child phenomenon, Freddy by name, from the Folies Bergere, Paris, is said to be very clever, and at once captures the hearts of all the ladies and children, in fact there is much in the entertainment that appeals to the feminine sex and the younger portion of our community, and the result is that the matinees are always crowded. Herr Tholen, from the Hippodrome, Paris, gives a very clever, comical, musical act in conjunction with a live singing poodle, which he has facetiously names ”Boulanger.” ”Boulanger” may prove a revelation, and if Tholen can find something new to do in the guise of a clown it would also be a revelation. The prevailing fancy for skirt dancing is not forgotten. Katie Seymour, from the principal London theaters, is said to be the most skilful and dainty of any of the artists in that line that have visited the metropolis, and there are also four danseuses from the Gaiety Theater, London, who execute a very graceful ”pas de quatre.” The list certainly gives evidence of a very diversified entertainment, and there is no reason to doubt but that the immense success and fashionably audiences that has been the lost of the organization in the Eastern cities will be fully duplicated here.’ (The Morning Call, San Francisco, California, Sunday, 27 April 1890, p. 11b/c)