Posts Tagged ‘Les Cloches de Corneville’

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Violet Cameron as Germaine in Les Cloches de Corneville, 1878

June 14, 2015

Violet Cameron (1862-1919), English actress and singer, as Germaine in the English version of Les Cloches de Corneville, Folly Theatre, London, 1878.
(after a drawing by Pilotell, 1878)

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January 10, 2013

Lucia Nola (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American soprano
(photo: Baker Art Gallery, Columbus, Ohio, circa 1905)

Lucia Nola, a soprano from Washington, D.C., has joined the Roscian Opera Company, 1905
‘Miss Lucia Nola, who was for some years prominently identified with the local singers as a soprano, is now with the Roscian Opera Company as prima donna soprano. The operas being given by the company are Sousa’s El Capitan, Gilbert and Sullivan’s Mikado, Balfe’s Bohemian Girl, [Robert Planquette’s] Chimes of Normandy [i.e. Les Cloches de Corneville], and [Victor Herbert’s] The Serenade which the Bostonians made famous. Miss Nola is heard in all the leading roles. She has hots of friends in this city, who will be interested to known of her success. Her work in Washington was characterized by a large amount of charitable work, such as the singing in the hospitals and the jail, and she did much other philanthropic work. She was a prominent and active member of the Doubleday Sunday Night Club.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 15 October 1905, Part Two, Editorial Section, p. 10a)

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January 10, 2013

Lucia Nola (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American soprano
(photo: Baker Art Gallery, Columbus, Ohio, circa 1905)

Lucia Nola, a soprano from Washington, D.C., has joined the Roscian Opera Company, 1905
‘Miss Lucia Nola, who was for some years prominently identified with the local singers as a soprano, is now with the Roscian Opera Company as prima donna soprano. The operas being given by the company are Sousa’s El Capitan, Gilbert and Sullivan’s Mikado, Balfe’s Bohemian Girl, [Robert Planquette’s] Chimes of Normandy [i.e. Les Cloches de Corneville], and [Victor Herbert’s] The Serenade which the Bostonians made famous. Miss Nola is heard in all the leading roles. She has hots of friends in this city, who will be interested to known of her success. Her work in Washington was characterized by a large amount of charitable work, such as the singing in the hospitals and the jail, and she did much other philanthropic work. She was a prominent and active member of the Doubleday Sunday Night Club.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 15 October 1905, Part Two, Editorial Section, p. 10a)