Posts Tagged ‘London Hippodrome’

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Gertrude Lawrence at Murray’s Night Club, London, 1920

September 26, 2013

Gertrude Lawrence (1898-1952), English actress and singer, as she appeared in 1920 as the lead in London’s first cabaret entertainment at Murray’s Night Club.
(photo: Claude Harris, London, 1920)

‘THE LEADER OF THE FROLICS.
‘It was a somewhat daring innovation on the part of Murray’s Club to introduce a Cabaret Entrainment each night during the dinner hour, as although very popular in the States and on the Continent the experiment had not been tried in this country, but owing to the fact that Mr. Jack May persuaded a really brilliant artiste to ”top the bill,” Murray’s Frolics have proved a big success and a great draw.
‘Miss Gertie Lawrence, who appears on our font cover in colours [see above], is without a doubt the coming revue star. She made a name for herself at the Vaudeville in Buzz Buzz, particularly with the song, ”Winnie the Window Cleaner,” and in the forthcoming Hippodrome Christmas pantomime she will take Miss Phyllis Dare‘s part at all the matinees… .
‘Miss Lawrence not only has a good voice but is also a fine actress, particularly when portraying a London type of to-day. She is a trained dancer, and was under Madame Judith Espinosa for some time, and studied elocution with Miss Italia Conti. She has been on the stage since she was ten, and comes of a theatrical family. The late Pony Moore was her godfather, and her father was with the Moore and Burgess Minstrels and afterwards interlocutor at the Palladium. She bids to become as well known as either Marie Lloyd or Albert Chevalier, with whose work hers had much in common.’
(The Dancing Times, Christmas number, London,1920, cover and p. 209)

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Charles Hawtrey in Time is Money, London, 1905 and 1909

August 23, 2013

a scene from Time is Money, Criterion Theatre, London, 3 August 1905, with, left to right, Dorothy Hammond as Mrs Murray, Mona Harrison as Susan, and Charles Hawtrey as Charles Grahame
(photo: unknown for The Play Pictorial, London, 1905)

Time is Money, a comedietta by Mrs Hugh Bell and Arthur Cecil, was first produced at the Theatre Royal, Newcastle-on-Tyne, 5 September 1890,

‘By way of answer to the complaint that the curtain-raiser is neglected, the Criterion Theatre has given us a lever de rideau in which no less an actor than Mr. Charles Hawtrey takes a part. Time is Money, the work in question, shows a little too grimly how quickly the clock moves in the theatre. It does not seem a very long time since it was a lively, fresh comedietta, but the other night one felt a little grieved that the actor should be using his gifts, and using them very ably, upon such mechanical humours and trifling verbal quips. However, a good deal of it is amusing. The favourite was in excellent form, and well supported by Miss Mona Harrison and Miss Dora Hammond.’
(The Sketch, London, 16 August 1905, p.156)

Charles Hawtrey revived Time is Money at the reopening of the London Hippodrome, 2 August 1909
‘A very comical episode is the basis of the little play ”Time is Money,” in which Mr. Charles Hawtrey has been appearing at the London Hippodrome. It is all about a gentleman who comes to propose to a lady. He takes a cab to the lady’s house, and in the natural excitement of the moment rushes indoors without paying the cabman. Not unnaturally, the cabman sends a message after him to remind him of the little oversight. Mr. Hawtrey plunges his hand apologetically into his pocket in order to give the maid the fare, and finds to his disgust that he has come out without money. He, therefore, instructs the maid to tell the cabby to wait and take him back. Cabby, however, has another engagement and cannot wait, and meanwhile the fare, that was eighteenpence just now, has already gone up to half-a-crown, and is still growing. Mr. Hawtrey’s representation of his embarrassment is quite delightful (says ”M.A.P.” [i.e. Mostly About People, a contemporary London periodical]), because when you have come to propose to a lady you can hardly begin by asking the loan of half-a-crown. The spectacle of Mr. Hawtrey singing a sentimental song at the piano to the lady’s accompaniment, and trying all the time not to hear the cabman’s appeal through the window for his long-delayed fare, is one of the funniest scenes imaginable.’
(Kalgoorlie Miner, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, Saturday, 25 September 1909, p. 1e)

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Pattie Wells, Madge Melbourne and Ruby Kennedy, in Our Miss Gibbs, Gaiety Theatre, London, 1909

August 22, 2013

left to right: Pattie Wells, Madge Melbourne and Ruby Kennedy, three of the ‘Girls at the Stores’ in Our Miss Gibbs, the musical play produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 23 January 1909. The cast was headed by George Grossmith junior, Edmund Payne, Denise Orme and Gertie Millar.
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909; hats by Maison Lewis, Hanover Square and Paris)

Pattie Wells began her career as one of the ‘Ladies of Havana’ in Havana, another musical play at the Gaiety (25 April 1908); and she was last seen in Potash and Perlmutter in Society, a comedy by Montague Glass and Roi Cooper Megrue, produced at the Queen’s Theatre, London, on 12 September 1916.

Madge Melbourne was an American, born about 1885. She appeared on Broadway and on tour in the United States between about 1903 and 1906. She arrived in England in December 1908 and lived in London until about 1918. Apart from her appearances in Our Miss Gibbs, during which she made A Gaiety Dueta short film with George Grossmith junior and Edmund Payne, Miss Melbourne was also in the cast of Hullo Ragtime!, London Hippodrome, 23 December 1912, with Ethel Levey, Lew Hearn, Willie Solar, Dorothy Minto and Shirley Kellogg. She was also in Are You There?, a new musical piece by Ruggiero Leoncavallo, produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, 28 October 1913, with Lawrence Grossmith, Alec Fraser, Shirley Kellogg and others. Her last appearance seems to have been in the one act comedy, Squibbs by Clifford Seyler, at the London Coliseum, in June 1915, with Mabel Russell and Charles Quartermaine.

Ruby Kennedy, whose real name was Ruby Trelawny, was born in 1889. She first appeared with Seymour Hicks and Ellaline Terriss as one of the ‘Guests’ in The Gay Gordons, a musical play which ran at the Aldwych Theatre, London, from 11 September 1907 for a run of 229 performances. She was last seen in another musical play, The Dancing Mistress, produced at the Adelphi Theatre, London, on 19 October 1912, with Joseph Coyne and Gertie Millar heading the cast. She was married to Group Captain (later Brigadier-General) Henry Brewster Percy Lion Kennedy (1878-1953) at St Luke, Chelsea, London, on 26 November 1913. She died in 1972.

One of Ruby Kennedy’s sisters was May Kennedy (née May Trelawny, 1885-1978) who also appeared in various musical productions, including The Gay Gordons and the revue, Everybody’s Doing It (Apollo Theatre, London, 9 December 1912), with J. Farren Soutar, Robert Hale, Ida Crispi and Unity More.

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Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, London Hippodrome, 1909

August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, London Hippodrome, November 1909

August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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Joy-Bells, London Hippodrome, 1919

July 22, 2013

song sheet cover for Albert de Courville’s 9th London Hippodrome revue, Joy-Bells, produced on 25 March 1919 and featuring Frederick W. Chappelle’s song, ”Wonderful Bird” sung by Winnie Melville.
The two main characters on this cover are stylised portraits of the stars of the show, George Robey and Shirley Kellogg.
(published by Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew Ltd, London, 1919; artwork by Arthur Ferrier) Joy-Bells was written by Albert de Courville, Wal Pink and Thomas J. Gray, with music by Frederick W. Chappelle. The production, staged by Ned Wayburn, opened on 25 March 1919 for a run of 723 performances.

Joy-Bells is noteworthy chiefly because during its run the Original Dixieland Jazz Band made a brief appearance. The band was so enthusiastically received by the audience that George Robey, the show’s star, delivered to de Courville an ultimatum to the effect that he would resign unless they went. Thereafter the ODJB appeared elsewhere and on tour and subsequently settled in for a successful nine months’ stay at the Palais de Danse in Hammersmith, west London.