Posts Tagged ‘Lyric Theatre (London)’

h1

Henry A. Lytton and the Cosy Corner Girls from The Earl and the Girl, London, 1904/05

May 20, 2014

Henry A. Lytton (1865-1936), English actor and singer, with the ‘Cozy Corner Girls’ (left to right, Gertrude Thornton, Clare Rickards and Hilda Hammerton) in the musical comedy, The Earl and the Girl which was first produced at the Adelphi Theatre, London, on 10 December 1903 before being transferred to the Lyric Theatre, London, on 12 September 1904.
(photo: unknown, probably Bassano or Ellis & Walery, London, 1904; postcard published by the Rapid Photo Co, London, 1904)

‘My Cosy Corner Girl,’ composed by John W. Bratton, with lyrics by Charles Noel Douglas, was imported from the United States for inclusion in The Earl and the Girl, when it was sung by Henry A. Lytton and Agnes Fraser. They also sang it at the Charles Morton Testimonial Matinee at the Palace Theatre, London, on 8 November 1904.

The Earl and the Girl, the most successful of all the musical comedies in which I appeared and the one which gave me my biggest real comedy part, ran for one year at the Adelphi, and then for a further year at the Lyric. When it was withdrawn I secured the permission of the management to use “My Cosy Corner,” the most tuneful of all its musical numbers, as a scena on the music-halls, and with my corps of Cosy Corner Girls it was a decided success.’
(Henry A. Lytton, The Secrets of a Savoyard, London, 1921, p. 86; Lytton’s ‘My Cosy Corner’ scena ran at the Palace Theatre, London, from April to June 1905)

‘My Cosey Corner Girl’ sung by Harry Macdonough, recorded by Edison, USA, 1903, cylinder 8522
(courtesy of Tim Gracyk via YouTube)

h1

Mai Bacon at the time of her appearance in Whirled into Happiness, a musical farce with music by Robert Stolz, produced at the Lyric Theatre, London, on 18 May 1922.

March 10, 2014

Mai Bacon (1897-1981), English actress, singer and dancer, at the time of her appearance in Whirled into Happiness, a musical farce adapted by Harry Graham from the book of Robert Bodanzky and Bruno Hardt-Warden, with lyrics by Harry Graham, and music by Robert Stolz, produced at the Lyric Theatre, London, on 18 May 1922.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1922)

Mai Bacon played Delphine de Lavallière, a French dancer; her duet, ‘That’s the Way It’s Done,’ with Billy Merson as Matthew Platt, proved especially popular.

* * * * *

Whirled into Happiness was an adaptation of Stolz, Bodanzky and Hardt-Warden’s operetta, Der Tanz ins Glück, which opened at the Raimundtheater, Berlin, on 23 December 1920. The first night of the New York production, entitled Sky High, took place at the Shubert Theatre on 2 March 1925, when the part of Delphine de Lavallière was played by Vanessi. The cast also included the English actress, Joyce Barbour.

h1

Sydney Valentine in The Light that Failed, Lyric Theatre, London, 1903

February 11, 2014

Sydney Valentine (1865-1919), English actor, as he appeared in the role of J.G. Fordham (‘Nilghai’) in the first production of The Light That Failed by George Fleming after the novel of the same name by Rudyard Kipling, published in 1890.
(photo: probably Bassano for The Play Pictorial, London, 1903)

The play, whose cast also included Johnston Forbes-Robertson, C. Aubrey Smith, Leon Quartermaine, Gertrude Elliott, Margaret Halston and Nina Boucicault, ran at the Lyric Theatre, London, from 7 February 1903 to 18 April 1903 and then at the New Theatre, London, from 20 April 1903 to 20 June 1903. Forbes-Robertson subsequently organized a tour of the United Kingdom of The Light That Failed with a different cast, headed by Sydney Brough and Beatrice Forbes-Robertson. Johnston Forbes-Robertson afterwards took the play to the United States, opening at the Knickerbocker Theatre, New York on 9 November 1903. Of the original London cast, he was accompanied by C. Aubrey Smith, Leon Quartermaine and Gertrude Elliott; Sydney Valentine’s old part of J.G. Fordham (‘Nilghai’) was played by George Sumner.

* * * * *

A ‘quite inadequate’ one act adaptation by Courtenay Thorpe of Kipling’s well known work was previously presented as a curtain-raiser at the Royalty Theatre, London, on 7 April 1898. Thorpe himself headed the cast, supported by Frank Atherley, Ruth Mackay and Furtado Clarke. The Stage (London, Thursday, 14 April 1898, p. 15b) described Miss Mackay as ‘a lady of handsome appearance and good voice, who may be recommended a close study of Cockney pronunciation if she wishes to make her present work more successful.’

h1

Grace Huntley in Dorothy

November 27, 2013

Grace Huntley (née Fanny Taylor, 1860?-1896), Scottish actress and singer, as she appeared in Dorothy, the successful comedy opera by B.C. Stephenson, with music by Alfred Cellier, which was first produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 25 September 1886. The production was transferred to the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 20 December 1886 and Miss Huntley joined the cast there to play the part of Phyllis Tuppitt in March 1887. Dorothy was subsequently transferred on 17 December 1888 to the Lyric Theatre, London, and its run finally ended on 6 April 1889 after a run of 931 performances and many changes of cast.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1887)

‘Regret will be felt in play-going circles at the news of the death, at Harrogate, of Miss Grace Huntley, one of the best known and most successful of burlesque actresses. She was the sister of Mrs. Richard Edgar, and had another sister and brother connected with the stage.’
(The Leeds Mercury, Leeds, Wednesday, 14 October 1896, p. 5h)

DEATHS.
‘HUNTLEY. – On Oct. 10th [1896], at Harrogate, of Bright’s disease, Grace Huntley, actress’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 17 October 1896, p. 14d)

Pick-Me-Up pays the following kindly tribute to the memory of Miss Grace Huntley and to the good work she did in Bristol:- ”The death of Miss Grace Huntley removes from the stage one who in her time was probably the best ‘principal boy’ we have had. Miss Huntley had, of course, been ‘principal boy’ at Drury Lane, but it was in provincial pantomimes – where the ‘principal boy’ is expected to work, not only to be looked at p that she was seen at her best. I have seen, I imagine, pretty well all the ‘principal boys’ in England, but with the exception of Ada Blanche (the Ada Blanche of five years ago) there was never a pantomime ‘boy’ to rival Miss Huntley. Her particular ‘note’ was a peculiar softness of speech and a certain indefinable charm, which was quite irresistible. Her voice never jarred upon you, and to gain her success she never resorted to anything but what was strictly legitimate. She was at the height of her ability, perhaps, seven or eight years ago. At Bristol, about that time, she was a particular favourite, and nothing could have been better than her performances in Mr. [John Henry] Chute’s Prince’s Theatre pantomimes, where she appeared several years running. Those who, like myself, had the pleasure of seeing her on those occasions will not easily forget her memory.’
(The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Saturday, 31 October 1896, p. 8e)

‘The will of Miss Fanny Taylor, popularly known by her professional name of Grace Huntley, who died on Oct. 10th, at 13, Belmont-avenue, Harrogate, has been proved in London by Mr James Kenwick Edward, the sole executor, by whom the testatrix’s personalty is sworn at £2,416 9s. 8d. gross, and £2,385 15s. 8d. net.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 14 November 1896, p. 12a)

h1

Grace Huntley, Scottish actress and singer, as she appeared in Dorothy, London, 1887

November 27, 2013

Grace Huntley (née Fanny Taylor, 1860?-1896), Scottish actress and singer, as she appeared in Dorothy, the successful comedy opera by B.C. Stephenson, with music by Alfred Cellier, which was first produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 25 September 1886. The production was transferred to the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 20 December 1886 and Miss Huntley joined the cast there to play the part of Phyllis Tuppitt in March 1887. Dorothy was subsequently transferred on 17 December 1888 to the Lyric Theatre, London, and its run finally ended on 6 April 1889 after a run of 931 performances and many changes of cast.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1887)

‘Regret will be felt in play-going circles at the news of the death, at Harrogate, of Miss Grace Huntley, one of the best known and most successful of burlesque actresses. She was the sister of Mrs. Richard Edgar, and had another sister and brother connected with the stage.’
(The Leeds Mercury, Leeds, Wednesday, 14 October 1896, p. 5h)

DEATHS.
‘HUNTLEY. – On Oct. 10th [1896], at Harrogate, of Bright’s disease, Grace Huntley, actress’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 17 October 1896, p. 14d)

Pick-Me-Up pays the following kindly tribute to the memory of Miss Grace Huntley and to the good work she did in Bristol:- ”The death of Miss Grace Huntley removes from the stage one who in her time was probably the best ‘principal boy’ we have had. Miss Huntley had, of course, been ‘principal boy’ at Drury Lane, but it was in provincial pantomimes – where the ‘principal boy’ is expected to work, not only to be looked at p that she was seen at her best. I have seen, I imagine, pretty well all the ‘principal boys’ in England, but with the exception of Ada Blanche (the Ada Blanche of five years ago) there was never a pantomime ‘boy’ to rival Miss Huntley. Her particular ‘note’ was a peculiar softness of speech and a certain indefinable charm, which was quite irresistible. Her voice never jarred upon you, and to gain her success she never resorted to anything but what was strictly legitimate. She was at the height of her ability, perhaps, seven or eight years ago. At Bristol, about that time, she was a particular favourite, and nothing could have been better than her performances in Mr. [John Henry] Chute’s Prince’s Theatre pantomimes, where she appeared several years running. Those who, like myself, had the pleasure of seeing her on those occasions will not easily forget her memory.’
(The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Saturday, 31 October 1896, p. 8e)

‘The will of Miss Fanny Taylor, popularly known by her professional name of Grace Huntley, who died on Oct. 10th, at 13, Belmont-avenue, Harrogate, has been proved in London by Mr James Kenwick Edward, the sole executor, by whom the testatrix’s personalty is sworn at £2,416 9s. 8d. gross, and £2,385 15s. 8d. net.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 14 November 1896, p. 12a)

h1

November 27, 2013

Grace Huntley (née Fanny Taylor, 1860?-1896), Scottish actress and singer, as she appeared in Dorothy, the successful comedy opera by B.C. Stephenson, with music by Alfred Cellier, which was first produced at the Gaiety Theatre, London, on 25 September 1886. The production was transferred to the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 20 December 1886 and Miss Huntley joined the cast there to play the part of Phyllis Tuppitt in March 1887. Dorothy was subsequently transferred on 17 December 1888 to the Lyric Theatre, London, and its run finally ended on 6 April 1889 after a run of 931 performances and many changes of cast.
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1887)

‘Regret will be felt in play-going circles at the news of the death, at Harrogate, of Miss Grace Huntley, one of the best known and most successful of burlesque actresses. She was the sister of Mrs. Richard Edgar, and had another sister and brother connected with the stage.’
(The Leeds Mercury, Leeds, Wednesday, 14 October 1896, p. 5h)

DEATHS.
‘HUNTLEY. – On Oct. 10th [1896], at Harrogate, of Bright’s disease, Grace Huntley, actress’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 17 October 1896, p. 14d)

Pick-Me-Up pays the following kindly tribute to the memory of Miss Grace Huntley and to the good work she did in Bristol:- “The death of Miss Grace Huntley removes from the stage one who in her time was probably the best ‘principal boy’ we have had. Miss Huntley had, of course, been ‘principal boy’ at Drury Lane, but it was in provincial pantomimes – where the ‘principal boy’ is expected to work, not only to be looked at p that she was seen at her best. I have seen, I imagine, pretty well all the ‘principal boys’ in England, but with the exception of Ada Blanche (the Ada Blanche of five years ago) there was never a pantomime ‘boy’ to rival Miss Huntley. Her particular ‘note’ was a peculiar softness of speech and a certain indefinable charm, which was quite irresistible. Her voice never jarred upon you, and to gain her success she never resorted to anything but what was strictly legitimate. She was at the height of her ability, perhaps, seven or eight years ago. At Bristol, about that time, she was a particular favourite, and nothing could have been better than her performances in Mr. [John Henry] Chute’s Prince’s Theatre pantomimes, where she appeared several years running. Those who, like myself, had the pleasure of seeing her on those occasions will not easily forget her memory.’
(The Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, Saturday, 31 October 1896, p. 8e)

‘The will of Miss Fanny Taylor, popularly known by her professional name of Grace Huntley, who died on Oct. 10th, at 13, Belmont-avenue, Harrogate, has been proved in London by Mr James Kenwick Edward, the sole executor, by whom the testatrix’s personalty is sworn at £2,416 9s. 8d. gross, and £2,385 15s. 8d. net.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 14 November 1896, p. 12a)

h1

José Collins heads the cast of The Merry Countess, Casino Theatre, New York, 1912

November 17, 2013

a scene from The Merry Countess, a comic opera based on Johann Strauss’s Die Fledermaus, book by Gladys Unger, lyrics by Arthur Anderson, which was produced at the Casino Theatre, New York, on 20 August 1912. Members of the cast in this photograph are (left to right) José Collins (1887-1958) as Countess Rosalinda Cliquot, Forrest Huff (1876-1947), Maurice Farkoa (1864-1916) as Gabor Szabo, Claude Flemming (1884-1952) and Martin Brown (1885-1936).
(photo: White, New York, 1912)

The London version of this production was seen at the Lyric Theatre on 30 December 1911, with Constance Drever as Countess Rosalinda Cliquot and Maurice Farkoa as Gabor Szabo. Both the London and New York productions featured the striking black and white gown allotted to the character of the Countess, seen here worn by Miss Collins. This gown was the inspiration for a similar black and white outfit designed by Cecil Beaton for one of the ladies of the Ascot scene chorus in the film, My Fair Lady (1964).