Posts Tagged ‘Mr Manhattan (musical play)’

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Peggy Kurton in Mr Manhatten, Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, 1916

September 13, 2013

Peggy Kurton (1895-1977), English musical comedy actress and singer, as she appeared as Evelyn in Mr Manhattan, the musical play with Raymond Hitchcock in the lead, which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916
(photo: Bertram Park, London, 1916)

Peggy Kurton, who until about the beginning of 1914 was known professionally by her real name of Gladys Kurton, was born in Bristol on 4 May 1895. She was the only child of Edgar Augustus Kurton (1870-1926) and his wife Sarah Ann Amelia Kurton (née Pettey, 1876-1937), who separated in 1904, although her father had a son in 1908 with his then partner, Beatrice Budd. Mrs Kurton filed for divorce in 1909, which the following year was denied.

Miss Kurton made her first appearance at the Adelphi Theatre, London, on 19 October 1912 in the chorus of The Dancing Mistress. She afterwards appeared successfully at the Gaiety Theatre and elsewhere in London in several productions and also in New York in 1914/15 and 1921/22. On her return to London she was seen in Battling Butler, a musical farce, at the New Oxford Theatre, which was produced on 8 December 1922. She was succeeded during the run by Phyllis Titmuss and was not seen again until September 1925 when she toured in a musical version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. This was her last appearance. In the meantime she had been brought up at Bow Street Police Court on 23 March 1925, where she was fined £2 for being drunk and disorderly in Gerrard Street, Soho, having been ejected ‘on account of her violent conduct’ from the ‘Forty Three’ Club during the early morning of the previous Sunday.

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Vera Neville

June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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Vera Neville, English actress and mother-in-law of the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee

June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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Raymond Hitchcock

March 3, 2013

song sheet cover with portrait of Raymond Hitchcock (1865-1929), American actor,
‘When You’re All Dressed Up and No Place to Go,’
which he sang in The Beauty Shop, produced at the Astor Theatre, New York City, 13 April 1914
(photo: unknown, probably USA, circa 1913; published by T.H. Harms & Francis Day & Hunter, New York, 1914)

Mr Hitchcock reprised ‘When You’re All Dressed Up and No Place to Go’ for his appearance in Mr Manhattan, at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916. He made a recording of it for the HMV label (02660) at the studios of The Gramophone Company Ltd at Hayes, near London, on 14 April 1916.