Posts Tagged ‘New York Theatre (New York)’

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Liane d’Eve, French chanteuse and dancer

April 15, 2014

Liane d’Eve (active 1903-1925), French chanteuse and dancer
(photo: Dobson, 132 Bold Street, Liverpool, circa 1919)

Liane d’Eve was born about 1878/78 in Saint-Dizier, north eastern France. She appears to have begun her career about 1902/03 and then made the first of many appearances in London at the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, during November 1905. She also went to the United States on two occasions, the first in 1907, when she made her debut on Monday, 18 November 1907, at the New York Theatre (where she was said to have been earning £200 per week), and again in 1923. Mdlle. d’Eve resided in London for part of her career, from about 1911 until about 1920.

The Eldorado, Ostend, Belgium, July 1903
‘Au clair de la lune … . L’autre soir, à l’Eldorado, la très élégante Liane d’Eve, en chantant cette délicieuse sérénade ”Bonsoir, madame la Lune … .”, a évoqué le souvenir deces autres couplets qui bercérent notre enfance: ”Au clair de la lune, mon ami Paierrot… .”.’
(Le Carillon, Ostend, Friday, 17 July 1903, p. 2d)

‘On nous demande le nom de l’éditeur de la nouvelle danse chantée et dansée par Mme Liane d’Eve. Cette danse a été éditée par la maison Veiller, 21, rue de Choiseul. It est certain que ”la Talonnette”, par son genre distingué, sera dansée demain dans tous les salons parisiens.’
(Le Figaro, Paris, Thursday, 4 April 1907, p. 5d)

The Tivoli music hall, London, week of Monday, 8 July 1907
‘Mr. Joseph Wilson’s programme at the popular Strand resort underwent a few changes on Monday evening, the chief new-comer being Mdlle. Liane d’Eve, a French singer with an attractive personality. The chief feature of her turn is that her changes of costume are made coram publico in a specially arranged dressing-room in the centre opening of the stage. Mdlle. D’Eve has a very agreeable voice, which is heard in five songs, of which the ”Mattiche” air is the last, this being followed by the characteristic dance.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 11 July 1907, p. 12d)

‘Mlle. Liane D’Eve, who appeared at the Tivoli on Monday night, is no stranger to town. She appeared at the Empire over twelve months ago, not, however, in exactly identical circumstances. Mlle. D’Eve is a beautiful girl who emerges from a large picture frame at the back of the stage. She sings and dances quite delightfully, returning from time to time to her frame, which is, in fact, a little dressing-room, and there changing her costume, even to delicate details, in full view of the audience.’ (Weekly Dispatch, London, Sunday, 14 July 1907, p. 10d)

The Holborn Empire, London, week beginning Monday, 24 July 1922
‘Liane D’Eve, the French comedienne, sings a number of songs in French and English to evident approval, but no artistic purpose is served by her changing her costumes in front of the audience. Nor is her idea of coming down right among the audience in her ”Play With Me” number a practice to be encouraged. Many people object to being singled out in an audience by a performer – to do so at close quarters only aggravates the business.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 27 July 1922, p. 10b)

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George W. Walker in In Dahomey

July 10, 2013

George W. Walker (1872/73-1911), African-American vaudevillian, as Rareback Pinkerton for the song, ‘The Czar, He is the Greatest Thing,’ in In Dahomey, the all African-American musical comedy which took London by storm after its opening there at the Shaftesbury Theatre on 16 May 1903. In Dahomey was first produced at the New York Theatre, New York, on 18 February 1903.
(photo: Cavendish Morton, London, 1903)

The Grand Theatre, Woolwich, London, week beginning Monday, 25 January 1904
‘Mr. Clarence Sounes has undoubtedly scored in securing In Dahomey, played by Williams and Walker and their company, for the first week of its tour. There was an enthusiastic audience on Monday. Messrs. Williams and Walker are without doubt the mainstay of the play. Mr. Bert Williams as the lugubrious Shylock Homestead causes roars of laughter, and his son, ”The Jonah Man,” is redemanded again and again. As the mercurial Rareback Pinkerton, Mr. Geo. W. Walker causes much merriment, and his dancing is one of the features of the show. His song, ”My Castle on the Nile,” was on Monday encored five times. The chorus business in his son, ”The Czar,” is also well done. Mr. G.A. Shipp as Hustling Charley acts with a fine sense of comedy, and his dancing is extremely clever. Mr. Harry Troy scores with his son, ”Mollie Green.” As George Reeder Mr. Alex. Rogers acts quietly. Mr. J. Lebrie Hill and Mr. Peter Hampton are successful as Hamilton Lightfoot and Dr. Straight. Miss Hattie McIntosh makes a dignified Cecilia Lightfoot. Miss Lottie Williams as Mr. Stringer brings her part into prominence. As Rosetta Miss Ada [Aida] Overton Walker makes a decided hit, and dances in a capital manner. Her song, ”A Actor Lady,” is well sung, which touches of burlesque. Miss Ada Guignesse sings ”Brown skin baby mine” in a style that makes one regret that it is her only appearance. At the finale of the last act there is a cakewalk competition among the members of the company for a prize presented by the management. Thunders of applause greet the efforts of each pair of dancers. Mr. J. Gladwin, the courteous acting-manager, should have difficulty in finding room for his patrons for the rest of the week.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 28 January 1904, p. 15b)

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July 10, 2013

George W. Walker (1872/73-1911), African-American vaudevillian, as Rareback Pinkerton for the song, ‘The Czar, He is the Greatest Thing,’ in In Dahomey, the all African-American musical comedy which took London by storm after its opening there at the Shaftesbury Theatre on 16 May 1903. In Dahomey was first produced at the New York Theatre, New York, on 18 February 1903.
(photo: Cavendish Morton, London, 1903)

The Grand Theatre, Woolwich, London, week beginning Monday, 25 January 1904
‘Mr. Clarence Sounes has undoubtedly scored in securing In Dahomey, played by Williams and Walker and their company, for the first week of its tour. There was an enthusiastic audience on Monday. Messrs. Williams and Walker are without doubt the mainstay of the play. Mr. Bert Williams as the lugubrious Shylock Homestead causes roars of laughter, and his son, “The Jonah Man,” is redemanded again and again. As the mercurial Rareback Pinkerton, Mr. Geo. W. Walker causes much merriment, and his dancing is one of the features of the show. His song, “My Castle on the Nile,” was on Monday encored five times. The chorus business in his son, “The Czar,” is also well done. Mr. G.A. Shipp as Hustling Charley acts with a fine sense of comedy, and his dancing is extremely clever. Mr. Harry Troy scores with his son, “Mollie Green.” As George Reeder Mr. Alex. Rogers acts quietly. Mr. J. Lebrie Hill and Mr. Peter Hampton are successful as Hamilton Lightfoot and Dr. Straight. Miss Hattie McIntosh makes a dignified Cecilia Lightfoot. Miss Lottie Williams as Mr. Stringer brings her part into prominence. As Rosetta Miss Ada [Aida] Overton Walker makes a decided hit, and dances in a capital manner. Her song, “A Actor Lady,” is well sung, which touches of burlesque. Miss Ada Guignesse sings “Brown skin baby mine” in a style that makes one regret that it is her only appearance. At the finale of the last act there is a cakewalk competition among the members of the company for a prize presented by the management. Thunders of applause greet the efforts of each pair of dancers. Mr. J. Gladwin, the courteous acting-manager, should have difficulty in finding room for his patrons for the rest of the week.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 28 January 1904, p. 15b)

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Kitty Gordon in Victor Herbert’s The Enchantress

June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING ”THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in ”The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. ”The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE ”BROKE”
”’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in ”The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
”’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ”The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,” said Kitty Gordon. ”Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of ”The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
””I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.”
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ”The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

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In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ‘(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING ”THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in ”The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. ”The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE ”BROKE”
”’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in ”The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
”’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ”The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,” said Kitty Gordon. ”Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of ”The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
””I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.”
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ”The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

* * * * *

In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ‘(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING “THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in “The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. “The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE “BROKE”
“’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in “The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
“’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ’’The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,“ said Kitty Gordon. ’’Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of “The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
“’’I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.“
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ’’The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

* * * * *

In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ’(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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Maude Raymond

February 9, 2013

Maude Raymond (Mrs Gus Rogers [Solomon], fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American actress and singer
(photo: White, New York, circa 1910)

Max Rogers and Maude Raymond star in The Young Turk, New York Theatre, New York, 31 January 1910
The Young Turk continues to be one of the theatrical magnets of Broadway that draw the crowds in quest of divertisement and recreation. Max Rogers, Maude Raymond and their supporting company have settled well and comfortably into their parts, while the elaborate production supplied by Klaw & Erlanger is a pleasing pictorial background for the comedy and music of the piece.’
(The Newark Advocate, Newark, Ohio, Saturday, 26 February 1910, p. 6d)