Posts Tagged ‘Pauline Hall’

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Lil Hawthorne as she appeared in 1898 and 1899 singing ‘Take it Home and Give it to the Baby’

February 3, 2014

Lil Hawthorne (1877-1926), American-born British music hall star and pantomime principal boy, as she appeared in 1898 and 1899 singing ‘Take it Home and Give it to the Baby,’ a song by William Furst with words by C.M.S. McLellan which was sung by Pauline Hall of the Pauline Hall Opera Company in the comic opera, The Honeymooners, which was first produced in the United States in 1893.
(photo: unknown, UK, probably 1898)

The Oxford music hall, London, week beginning Monday, 12 July 1898
‘A highly popular favourite at the Oxford is Miss Lil Hawthorne, a beautiful American girl, one of the Three Sisters Hawthorne, who made such a hit in ”The Willow Pattern Plate” last year. ”Lil,” while singing her first song, creates a diversion by distributing a number of dolls among the audience. In her second item, ”Sweet Rosie O’Grady,” she is assisted in the chorus by a young standing in the circle, and is vociferously encored and recalled after an emphatic success.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 16 July 1898, p. 16a)

The Alhambra, Leicester Square, London, week beginning Monday, 22 August 1899
‘Since our last notice of the variety entertainment at the Alhambra, the company has been reinforced by the enlistment of Miss Lil Hawthorne, who, attired as a doll-seller, songs ”Take it home and give it to the baby,” flinging some of her poupéesto the eager and delighted audience, who warmly applaud her. She Has a handsome appearance and a good voice, and sings with expressive earnestness.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 26 August 1899, p. 18a)

The Granville music hall, Waltham Green, London, week beginning Monday, 30 October 1899
‘Miss Lil Hawthorne (formerly of the Three Sisters Hawthorne) is very popular with the Waltham-green folk, and her capital voice and charming appearance are largely responsible for her undoubted success. She gets at the hearts of the women-folk in her first song, ”Take it home and give it to the baby,” by a distribution of toy dolls, but takes admiration by storm in her second item, ”I’ll be your sweetheart,” the chorus of which is chanted from the balcony by a sweet-voiced youth.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 4 November 1899, p. 19b)

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Pauline Hall

May 8, 2013

Pauline Hall (1860-1919), American actress and singer, at Chase’s, Washington, D.C., week beginning 20 August 1906
(photo: unknown, probably New York, circa 1895)

‘Chase’s has picked for the present week of polite vaudeville, commencing at the matinee to-morrow, a number of the choicest attractions of the new season, and especially prominent in the number of offerings this week will be Pauline Hall, affectionately esteemed “Queen of Comic Opera.” It has been several seasons since Miss Pauline Hall appeared in polite vaudeville, the interim being occupied by starring tours in revivals of the comic operas she made famous in the days when those tuneful composition were most admirable and best appreciated. In the knowledge that the Chase patrons are staunch admirers of Miss Hall, Chase’s went to extraordinary efforts to bring about the singing of the prima donna for the present week. Miss Hall will sing the vocal gems from her famous roles in the operas with which her name is inseparably associated, and she will enhance the popularity of this revival of old favorites by appearing in the costumes appropriate to each of the noted parts.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 19 August 1906, Third Part, p.4d)

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Emma Carson

March 31, 2013

an extra large cabinet photograph, 12 ¾ x 7 inches, of Emma Carson (fl. 1880s), American actress and singer, as she appeared in a revival of H.B. Farnie’s burlesque version of Offenbach’s Bluebeard, produced at the Bijou Opera House, New York, Tuesday, 6 May 1884
(photo: Moreno, New York, 1884)

‘BIJOU OPERA-HOUSE.
‘A crude burlesque of that bright, spirited trifle, Barbe-Bleue, was given last night at the Bijou Opera-house. The French piece, done here several years ago by Irma, Aujac, and a clever company, is perhaps almost forgotten now. Lydia Thompson, without doubt the only woman who could charm away the stupidity of broad and vulgar burlesque, originally presented Farnie’s version of the Offenbach farce in this city. This version was used last night, though hardly in its right form. The performance, like most things of its kind, was composed chiefly of extravaganza, absurdity, and womanhood with a small amount of clothes. A ”variety ball” dance, at the end of the first act, seemed to enliven the audience. Much of Offenbach’s music written for Barbe-Bleue was not sung. That part of it which was sung fared badly. Mr. Jacques Kruger as Bluebeard, and Mr. Arthur W. Tams as Corporal Zong Zong were the most efficient members of the company. Miss Emma Carson and Miss Irene Perry were not especially entertaining, and Miss Pauline Hall appeared to be a rather lame Venus. There was little talent shown by these mediocre exponents of the ancient leg drama. Luckily, Mr. Kruger was amusing.’
(The New York Times, New York, Wednesday, 7 May 1884, p. 4f)

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March 31, 2013

an extra large cabinet photograph, 12 ¾ x 7 inches, of Emma Carson (fl. 1880s), American actress and singer, as she appeared in a revival of H.B. Farnie’s burlesque version of Offenbach’s Bluebeard, produced at the Bijou Opera House, New York, Tuesday, 6 May 1884
(photo: Moreno, New York, 1884)

‘BIJOU OPERA-HOUSE.
‘A crude burlesque of that bright, spirited trifle, Barbe-Bleue, was given last night at the Bijou Opera-house. The French piece, done here several years ago by Irma, Aujac, and a clever company, is perhaps almost forgotten now. Lydia Thompson, without doubt the only woman who could charm away the stupidity of broad and vulgar burlesque, originally presented Farnie’s version of the Offenbach farce in this city. This version was used last night, though hardly in its right form. The performance, like most things of its kind, was composed chiefly of extravaganza, absurdity, and womanhood with a small amount of clothes. A “variety ball” dance, at the end of the first act, seemed to enliven the audience. Much of Offenbach’s music written for Barbe-Bleue was not sung. That part of it which was sung fared badly. Mr. Jacques Kruger as Bluebeard, and Mr. Arthur W. Tams as Corporal Zong Zong were the most efficient members of the company. Miss Emma Carson and Miss Irene Perry were not especially entertaining, and Miss Pauline Hall appeared to be a rather lame Venus. There was little talent shown by these mediocre exponents of the ancient leg drama. Luckily, Mr. Kruger was amusing.’
(The New York Times, New York, Wednesday, 7 May 1884, p. 4f)