Posts Tagged ‘Phyllis Dare’

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Phyllis Dare in Edgar Wallace’s The Yellow Mask, London, 1928

October 6, 2014

Phyllis Dare (1890-1975), English star of musical comedy, as she appeared in EdgarWallace‘s musical comedy drama, The Yellow Mask, which was first seen at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham, 5 November 1927 before opening at the Carlton Theatre, London, on 8 February 1928. The production was subsequently transferred to His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 26 March 1928 and then to the London Palladium, 25 June 1928. Other leading members of the cast were Bobby Howes, Malcom Keen and Winnie Collins.
(photo: Stage Photo Co, London, 1928)

‘The ”leading lady” in The Yellow Mask is Miss Phyllis Dare and of its type her dancing is a joy to watch. Her movements are so controlled and graceful and there is such a wealth of meaning in the play of her hands and arms. I do not know at all where Miss Dare had her original dancing lessons, but I am confident that at some time or other she must have been well grounded in the simple technique of the ballet.’
(The Dancing Times, London, August 1928, pp. 487 and 488)

In 1930 The Yellow Mask was adapted for the cinema, starring Lupino Lane and Dorothy Seacombe, with Winnie Collins in her original part of Molly.

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Phyllis Dare as Peggy in The Dairymaids, 1907-1908

October 8, 2013

Phyllis Dare (1890-1975), English actress, singer and star of musical comedy as she appeared in The Dairymaids, a farcical musical play, with music by Paul Rubens and Frank E. Tours, 1907-1908
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1907/08)

The Dairymaids was first produced by Robert Courtneidge at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 14 April 1906, with Carrie Moore in the leading role of Peggy. The piece ran for 239 performances and closed on 8 December 1906. Courtneidge organized various tours of The Dairymaids, including one for the autumn of 1907 which began at the Gaiety Theatre, Douglas, Isle of Man, on Monday, 19 August, with Phyllis Dare playing Peggy. Miss Dare was obliged to abandon her appearances for two weeks (Belfast and Sheffield) because of laryngitis, when the part of Peggy was taken by Violet Lloyd.

After a break during the Christmas season of 1907/08, during which Phyllis Dare appeared with Carrie Moore, Gwennie Hasto, Esta Stella, Rosie Berganine, John Humphries, Dan Rolyat, Stephen Adeson and Fred Leslie junior in the pantomime Cinderella at the Theatre Royal, Birmingham, she was again seen as Peggy in The Dairymaids. The production opened at the Queen’s Theatre, London, on 5 May 1908 for a run of 83 performances and closed on 18 July 1908.

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‘LONDON, May 13 [1908]… . Revival of The Dairymaids this week at the Queen’s, the newest of London theaters, brings up that precocious little actress, Phyllis Dare, who, although she has been an established London favorite for three years, is only 19 years old. She has more ”puppy” adorers than any other woman on the English stage. The junior ”Johnnydom” goes mad over her, assures her of a well-filled house whenever she appears, and buys her postcards in thousands. It was the fair haired Phyllis who was summoned back from boarding school in Belgium when only 17 years of age to assume Edna May’s part in The Belle of Mayfair, when that independent American actress threw up her part because of the importance given to Camille Clifford, the original ”original” Gibson girl. The papers made so much of the fact that the little Phyllis’s studies had been interrupted by the siren call of Thespis that she packed the playhouse for many weeks with a curious public, many of whom had never before heard her name. Now I hear that Miss Dare will shortly essay the role of Juliet at a special matinee to be arranged by Robert Courtneidge, her manager.’
(Deseret Evening News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Saturday, 23 May 1908, p. 16c)

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Belle Ross in The Dairymaids on tour in the UK during 1908

October 2, 2013

Belle Ross (active 1907/09), English actress and dancer, as she appeared in a United Kingdom tour during 1908 of The Dairymaids
(photo: Bassano, London, 1908)

Belle Ross first came to notice during the Christmas season of 1907/08 as Little Red Riding Hood in the touring pantomime, A Fairy Pantomime; or, Little Red Riding Hood, which opened at the Lyceum Theatre, Ipswich, before moving on to the Royal Theatre, Peterborough, and then to the Royal Theatre, Norwich. She next appeared during 1908 as Rosie in a touring production headed by Phyllis Dare of The Dairymaids, a farcical musical play. The following Christmas Belle Ross was seen as Lord Chestnut in the pantomime, Cinderella, which was produced at the Adelphi Theatre, London, on 24 December 1908, with Dan Roylat as the Baron, Mabel Russell as Mopsa, Carrie Moore as Rudolph and Phyllis Dare in the title role.

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October 2, 2013

Belle Ross (active 1907/09), English actress and dancer, as she appeared in a United Kingdom tour during 1908 of The Dairymaids
(photo: Bassano, London, 1908)

Belle Ross first came to notice during the Christmas season of 1907/08 as Little Red Riding Hood in the touring pantomime, A Fairy Pantomime; or, Little Red Riding Hood, which opened at the Lyceum Theatre, Ipswich, before moving on to the Royal Theatre, Peterborough, and then to the Royal Theatre, Norwich. She next appeared during 1908 as Rosie in a touring production headed by Phyllis Dare of The Dairymaids, a farcical musical play. The following Christmas Belle Ross was seen as Lord Chestnut in the pantomime, Cinderella, which was produced at the Adelphi Theatre, London, on 24 December 1908, with Dan Roylat as the Baron, Mabel Russell as Mopsa, Carrie Moore as Rudolph and Phyllis Dare in the title role.

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Gertrude Lawrence at Murray’s Night Club, London, 1920

September 26, 2013

Gertrude Lawrence (1898-1952), English actress and singer, as she appeared in 1920 as the lead in London’s first cabaret entertainment at Murray’s Night Club.
(photo: Claude Harris, London, 1920)

‘THE LEADER OF THE FROLICS.
‘It was a somewhat daring innovation on the part of Murray’s Club to introduce a Cabaret Entrainment each night during the dinner hour, as although very popular in the States and on the Continent the experiment had not been tried in this country, but owing to the fact that Mr. Jack May persuaded a really brilliant artiste to ”top the bill,” Murray’s Frolics have proved a big success and a great draw.
‘Miss Gertie Lawrence, who appears on our font cover in colours [see above], is without a doubt the coming revue star. She made a name for herself at the Vaudeville in Buzz Buzz, particularly with the song, ”Winnie the Window Cleaner,” and in the forthcoming Hippodrome Christmas pantomime she will take Miss Phyllis Dare‘s part at all the matinees… .
‘Miss Lawrence not only has a good voice but is also a fine actress, particularly when portraying a London type of to-day. She is a trained dancer, and was under Madame Judith Espinosa for some time, and studied elocution with Miss Italia Conti. She has been on the stage since she was ten, and comes of a theatrical family. The late Pony Moore was her godfather, and her father was with the Moore and Burgess Minstrels and afterwards interlocutor at the Palladium. She bids to become as well known as either Marie Lloyd or Albert Chevalier, with whose work hers had much in common.’
(The Dancing Times, Christmas number, London,1920, cover and p. 209)

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Phyllis Dare, a ‘Portrait Relief’ postcard by J. Beagles & Co, London, circa 1905

September 16, 2013

a J. Beagles & Co ‘Portrait Relief’ postcard photograph (no. 735 P) of Phyllis Dare (1890-1975), English musical comedy actress and singer.
(photo: probably Foulsham & Banfield, London, circa 1905)

‘Portrait Relief’ postcards, which have a 3-D effect, were published by J. Beagles & Co of London for a short period around 1904-1905.

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Dolly Dombey

August 3, 2013

Dolly Dombey (1887-1967), English musical comedy actress/chorus girl
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1909)

Dolly Dombey, whose real name was Florence Newton, was born in Lambeth, London, in 1887. In 1909 she married Fred J. Blackman (1879-1951), a former actor and theatrical producer who from 1907 to 1921 was in charge of all tours of the productions originating at Daly’s Theatre, London, including The Merry Widow and The Dollar Princess. For the next five or six years he produced various musical shows in London, including The Lady of the Rose with Phyllis Dare in the leading role (Daly’s, 1922) and Katja the Dancer (Gaiety, 1925). In 1927 the couple emigrated with their three children, Joan, Timothy and Barabra, to Australia where Blackman worked in a similar capacity for Williamson & Tait Ltd.

Miss Dombey was one of a number of bit-part actresses who were well-known to London audiences who favoured musicals during the years immediately preceding the First World War. She appeared during the runs of the following productions: The Merry Widow (Daly’s, 8 June 1907); The Dollar Princess (Daly’s, 25 September 1909); The Quaker Girl (Adelphi, 5 November 1910); The Count of Luxembourg (Daly’s, 20 May 1911); The Marriage Market (Daly’s, 17 May 1913); and a revival of A Country Girl (Daly’s, 28 October 1914). Her final appearance was as Lady Mendie in succession to Therese Mills in A Southern Maid (Daly’s, 18 May 1920).