Posts Tagged ‘Rose Marie (musical play)’

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Régine Flory, French singer and dancer, a Parisian and London favourite

April 18, 2014

Régine Flory (née Marie Antoinette Artaz, 1894-1926), French singer and dancer, as she appeared in a revue at the Cigale, Paris, during 1919.
(photo: Felix, Paris, 1919)

‘Mlle. Régine Flory is another young artist of great promise. Hitherto she had always seemed an excellent revue star, but in a recent revue at the Cigale she revealed an astonishing tenderness and dramatic intensity. Next she will be see in The Bird of Paradise. I should dearly love to see her as – Juliette.’
(Tor de Arozarena, ‘The Paris Stage,’ ‘The Stage’ Year Book 1920, London, 1920, p. 61)

Mlle. Flory as she appeared in the revue, Vanity Fair, which was produced at the Palace Theatre, London, under the management of Alfred Butt on 6 November 1916. This recording of her singing ‘The Tanko,’ a ditty so disapproved of by Siegfried Sassoon, written by Arthur Wimperis, with music by Max Darewski, was recorded for the HMV label (2-3222) in the studios of The Gramophone Co Ltd at Hayes, Middlesex, near London, on 16 January 1917.

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Regine Flory’s untimely death, which occurred at Drury Lane Theatre on 17 June 1926, during a performance of Rose Marie, was reported across the globe. For the full, distressing details, see The Times, London, Wednesday, 23 June 1926, p. 5.

‘While the performance of Rose Marie was being played to a packed house at Drury Lane, Mlle. Regine Flory, a French revue actress and dancer, shot and killed herself in the manager’s office at the theatre. It is said the tragedy occurred in the presence of Sir Alfred Butt and another man, a friend of the actress, while Mlle. Flory was having an interview with Sir Alfred over some business connected with theatrical employment. The dead woman was only 32 years of age and had appeared in various West-End shows at the Palace, Gaiety, etc. her last engagement in London was in 1917 and, it appeared, she was very desirous of again starring in a musical show. Two years ago she attempted to drown herself in the seine, and had been in ill health for some time.’
(The Vaudeville New and New York Star, New York, Friday, 9 July 1926, p. 6b)

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April 18, 2014

Régine Flory (née Marie Antoinette Artaz, 1894-1926), French singer and dancer, as she appeared in a revue at the Cigale, Paris, during 1919.
(photo: Felix, Paris, 1919)

‘Mlle. Régine Flory is another young artist of great promise. Hitherto she had always seemed an excellent revue star, but in a recent revue at the Cigale she revealed an astonishing tenderness and dramatic intensity. Next she will be see in The Bird of Paradise. I should dearly love to see her as – Juliette.’
(Tor de Arozarena, ‘The Paris Stage,’ ‘The Stage’ Year Book 1920, London, 1920, p. 61)

Mlle. Flory as she appeared in the revue, Vanity Fair, which was produced at the Palace Theatre, London, under the management of Alfred Butt on 6 November 1916. This recording of her singing ‘The Tanko,’ a ditty so disapproved of by Siegfried Sassoon, written by Arthur Wimperis, with music by Max Darewski, was recorded for the HMV label (2-3222) in the studios of The Gramophone Co Ltd at Hayes, Middlesex, near London, on 16 January 1917.

* * * * *

Regine Flory’s untimely death, which occurred at Drury Lane Theatre on 17 June 1926, during a performance of Rose Marie, was reported across the globe. For the full, distressing details, see The Times, London, Wednesday, 23 June 1926, p. 5.

‘While the performance of Rose Marie was being played to a packed house at Drury Lane, Mlle. Regine Flory, a French revue actress and dancer, shot and killed herself in the manager’s office at the theatre. It is said the tragedy occurred in the presence of Sir Alfred Butt and another man, a friend of the actress, while Mlle. Flory was having an interview with Sir Alfred over some business connected with theatrical employment. The dead woman was only 32 years of age and had appeared in various West-End shows at the Palace, Gaiety, etc. her last engagement in London was in 1917 and, it appeared, she was very desirous of again starring in a musical show. Two years ago she attempted to drown herself in the seine, and had been in ill health for some time.’
(The Vaudeville New and New York Star, New York, Friday, 9 July 1926, p. 6b)

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Madeleine Rossiter

October 5, 2013

Madeline Rossiter (1888?-1964), English actress, singer, dancer and entertainer
(photo: Arthur Squibbs, Tenby, South Wales, circa 1910)

Madelaine Rossiter (Mrs William Henry Olley) is at present first recorded during 1905 as a dancer in C. St. John Denton’s UK touring company of the musical comedy, Kitty Grey, with Hilda Guiver in the title role. She afterwards had a varied career on the music hall and variety theatre stage, in pantomimes and concert parties. In addition to her work in the United Kingdom she was also a favourite in Australia and the Far East. During 1928 she was with Daniel Mayer’s company on a UK tour of Rose Marie, in the part of Wanda, in which she scored a success with the ‘Totem Tom-tom‘ number, in which she danced and was accompanied by the chorus; with Nancie Lovat in the title role.

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The Bedford music hall, London, week beginning Monday, ‘Miss Madeline Rossiter, a clever and pretty Creole, is loudly applauded for a couple of songs and a particularly graceful dance.’
(The Stage, London, Thursday, 28 November 1907, p. 18b)

The Tivoli Theatre, Adelaide, South Australia, Thursday, 29 March 1917.
‘Madeline Rossiter, the swarthy dancer and singer of the Strollers Company appearing at the Tivoli Theatre, again scored the biggest hit in the new programme staged on Thursday evening last. Her chief contribution was a dainty little song, ”Why do you keep laughing at me with those big brown eyes?” with a particularly sharp pronunciation of ”Laughing,” turning it into the accepted Americanism ”Laffing.” The artist followed this up with a rhythmic dance to the melody of the same tune, throwing in a little suggestion of the spring song dance as well. The big audience was not slow to appreciate it, and insisted on Miss Rossiter coming back for an encore. Her response was a brilliant effort in foot and toe work. She is without doubt one of the finest dancers seen in this city for many years.’
(The Mail, Adelaide, Saturday, 31 March 1917, p. 13c)

Madeline Rossiter eventually retired to Scarborough, Yorkshire, where she died at the age of 76 in 1964.