Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Phillips’

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Mab Paul, English actress

February 8, 2014

Mab Paul (1873/83?-?; active 1900-1916), English actress
(photo: Albert Sachs, Bradford, circa 1905)

Mab Paul appears to have begun her career as a dancer in musical comedy and pantomime, appearing during 1900 in a tour of My Girl headed by John Le Hay, and at the Opera House, Crouch End, north London, during the Christmas season of 1900 in the pantomime Babes in the Wood. She subsequently played the part of Melantho in Stephen Phillips’s poetic drama, Ulysses, with Herbert Beerbohm Tree in the title role, at Her Majesty’s Theatre, London, produced on 1 February 1902. In April 1903 Miss Paul appeared in the small part of Marozia in Sir Henry Irving’s English production at Drury Lane of Dante after Sardou and Moreau’s original play. She accompanied Irving’s company in the same piece, opening for a three week season at the Broadway Theatre, New York City, on 26 October that year. Following a short tour the company returned to England in March 1904. After that Miss Paul spend some years on to tour the United Kingdom and then, at the beginning of 1910, she went to Australia where she continued her career until about 1916.

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Mab Paul in Sydney, Australia, October 1910, during a tour of Australia with George Willoughby’s English Farcical Comedy Company
‘ASSAULT ON AN ACTRESS.
‘Miss Mab Paul Attacked.
‘Her Assailant Worsted.
‘An attack upon Miss Mab Paul, leading lady of the George Willoughby Night of the Party Company, was made by an unknown man at the North Shore on Thursday night. Fortunately she was able to defend herself, and her assailant was the chief sufferer.
‘Miss Paul travelled by the 11.30 p.m. boat from town, and on arrival at the northern shore decided to walk to her quarters at Beulah flats. Within a few hundred yards of her destination she was set upon by a footpad, who caught her by both arms and endeavoured to snatch her handbag. Miss Paul, who is just over six feet, and something of an athlete, finding herself in the grip of the man, made a determined effort and kicked him hard upon the shin. He let go his hold, whereupon the actress hit him across the face with her handbag. Her assailant staggered back. Miss Paul then dropped the gag, and, clenching her fists, struck the man twice. The first blow glanced off, and her left hand grazed along a wall, causing a painful wound. The second blow was more effective, catching the footpad full upon the point of the jaw, and causing his downfall. As he fell Miss Paul recovered her bag and hurried home.
‘A sympathetic public gave her a rousing reception in The Night of the Party last night, when she appeared [at the Criterion Theatre, Sydney] with her hand in bandages.’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 October 1910, p. 14b)

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February 8, 2014

Mab Paul (1873/83?-?; active 1900-1916), English actress
(photo: Albert Sachs, Bradford, circa 1905)

Mab Paul appears to have begun her career as a dancer in musical comedy and pantomime, appearing during 1900 in a tour of My Girl headed by John Le Hay, and at the Opera House, Crouch End, north London, during the Christmas season of 1900 in the pantomime Babes in the Wood. She subsequently played the part of Melantho in Stephen Phillips’s poetic drama, Ulysses, with Herbert Beerbohm Tree in the title role, at Her Majesty’s Theatre, London, produced on 1 February 1902. In April 1903 Miss Paul appeared in the small part of Marozia in Sir Henry Irving’s English production at Drury Lane of Dante after Sardou and Moreau’s original play. She accompanied Irving’s company in the same piece, opening for a three week season at the Broadway Theatre, New York City, on 26 October that year. Following a short tour the company returned to England in March 1904. After that Miss Paul spend some years on to tour the United Kingdom and then, at the beginning of 1910, she went to Australia where she continued her career until about 1916.

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Mab Paul in Sydney, Australia, October 1910, during a tour of Australia with George Willoughby’s English Farcical Comedy Company
‘ASSAULT ON AN ACTRESS.
‘Miss Mab Paul Attacked.
‘Her Assailant Worsted.
‘An attack upon Miss Mab Paul, leading lady of the George Willoughby Night of the Party Company, was made by an unknown man at the North Shore on Thursday night. Fortunately she was able to defend herself, and her assailant was the chief sufferer.
‘Miss Paul travelled by the 11.30 p.m. boat from town, and on arrival at the northern shore decided to walk to her quarters at Beulah flats. Within a few hundred yards of her destination she was set upon by a footpad, who caught her by both arms and endeavoured to snatch her handbag. Miss Paul, who is just over six feet, and something of an athlete, finding herself in the grip of the man, made a determined effort and kicked him hard upon the shin. He let go his hold, whereupon the actress hit him across the face with her handbag. Her assailant staggered back. Miss Paul then dropped the gag, and, clenching her fists, struck the man twice. The first blow glanced off, and her left hand grazed along a wall, causing a painful wound. The second blow was more effective, catching the footpad full upon the point of the jaw, and causing his downfall. As he fell Miss Paul recovered her bag and hurried home.
‘A sympathetic public gave her a rousing reception in The Night of the Party last night, when she appeared [at the Criterion Theatre, Sydney] with her hand in bandages.’
(The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, NSW, Australia, Saturday, 22 October 1910, p. 14b)

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Phyllis Embury

May 24, 2013

Phyllis Embury (1889?-1948), English actress
(photo: Alfred Ellis & Walery, London, circa 1906)

Phyllis Embury, who is said to have been born in Leeds, Yorkshire, is first mentioned in connection with Herbert Beerbohm Tree, playing the small part of Octavia in his production of Stephen Phillips’s Nero, which was first performed at His Majesty’s Theatre, London, on 25 January 1906. She then appeared as the 2nd twin in a revival of J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan at the Duke of York’s Theatre, London, 22 December 1906. She played the same character the following year (Duke of York’s, 16 December 1907) and other small parts followed, the last being in Vice-Versa, a farcical fantasy, at the Comedy Theatre, London, which opened for a run of 40 performances on 18 December 1911.

Miss Embury’s career came to an end upon her married in 1912 to Stanley Dodd (1876-1946), a successful obstetric physician, the son of Arthur Dodd (1838-1924), a diamond merchant trading as P.G. Dodd & Son, and grandson of Philip George Dodd (1801-1865), a well-known retail jeweller and silversmith of Leadenhall Street and Cornhill, City of London.

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Edith Wynne Matthison

May 8, 2013

Edith Wynne Matthison (1875-1955), English actress, in the title role of the 16th Century morality play, Everyman, rediscovered by William Poel and first produced on the commercial stage at the Imperial Theatre, London, 11 June 1902. Miss Wynne Matthison later appeared in the same piece in Washington, D.C. and New York, March, 1908
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, circa 1905)

‘Charles Rann Kennedy’s drama, The Servant in the House, which is being awaited with so much interested since Henry Miller’s declaration that it is “one of the greatest plays of this generation both in largeness of theme and originality of treatment,” is soon to be presented here, preliminary to its New York production by a cast that would in itself attract decided attention. Edith Wynne Matthison the delightful actress who made such a hit in Everyman, and as Shakesepeare’s Rosalind and Viola, has returned to America to create the leading feminine role while Mabel Moore, another noted English actress, who figures in the recent Court Theater triumphs, will also be in the cast. Walter Hampden, who distinguished himself as leading man for both Viola Allen and Nazimova, will be associated with Tyrone Power whose Lord Steyn and Judas with Mrs Fiske and Ulysses in Stephen Phillips’ poetic drama are still fresh in public remembrance, with Charles Dalton, Arthur Lewis, and others. The play will be an early offering at the Belasco.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 1 March 1908, Third Part, p.3c)

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Esme Percy

April 19, 2013

Esmé Percy (1887-1957), English actor and theatrical producer, as Britannicus, with Phyllis Embury as Octavia, in H. Beerbohm Tree’s spectacular production of Stephen Phillips’s poetical play, Nero, His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 25 January 1906
(photo: unknown, london, 1906)

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April 19, 2013

Esmé Percy (1887-1957), English actor and theatrical producer, as Britannicus, with Phyllis Embury as Octavia, in H. Beerbohm Tree’s spectacular production of Stephen Phillips’s poetical play, Nero, His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 25 January 1906
(photo: unknown, london, 1906)

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April 19, 2013

Esmé Percy (1887-1957), English actor and theatrical producer, as Britannicus, with Phyllis Embury as Octavia, in H. Beerbohm Tree’s spectacular production of Stephen Phillips’s poetical play, Nero, His Majesty’s Theatre, London, 25 January 1906
(photo: unknown, london, 1906)