Posts Tagged ‘The Bostonians’

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January 11, 2013

Andrew Higginson as Danilo and Carrie Moore as Sonia
in the Australian production of The Merry Widow,
Her Majesty’s Theatre, Melbourne, 6 May 1908
(photo: Talma, Melbourne, 1908)

Carrie Moore as Sonia in The Merry Widow, Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, and her sudden marriage, May 1908
‘Sydney, N.S.W., Nov. 25 [1908].
‘The theatrical sensation of the past month has been caused by the unexpectedly sudden wedding of Carrie Moore – at present appearing in the name part in The Merry Widow at Her Majesty’s Theatre – and the subsequent happenings. Hardly had Mr. and Mrs. Percy Bigwood recovered from the host of congratulations showered on them when news of their marriage leaked out, when a lady in the person of Ivy Salvin comes post haste from Melbourne and, through her Sydney solicitor, issues a Supreme Court writ, claiming £5,000 damages for alleged breach of promise on the part of the gentleman now known in Sydney as “Carrie Moore’s husband.” This action was subsequently settled to the satisfaction of both parties, and Ivy Salvin accepted her first theatrical engagement in The Belle of Mayfair at the Criterion Theatre, which engagement she is now relinquishing to enter the married state. Such is fame!
‘“Carrie Moore’s Husband” is a young Englishman of means, not altogether unknown on the African and Australian turf, where his racing colors have met with judge’s eye on more than one occasion.
‘Carrie Moore is retiring from the cast of The Merry Widow and returning to England, where she is under engagement to appear as principal boy under the management of Bob Courtneidge in the forthcoming pantomime of Cinderella at London’s Adelphi Theatre. Her place as the dashing Widow will be filled by Betty Ohls, an actress well known on your side, where in 1904 she appeared with the Bostonians as Maid Marian in De Koven’s Robin Hood, and subsequent American appearances include those in The Queen of Laughter, at Boston; The Student King, at Chicago, and The Rose of the Alhambra, in New York. She has recently been appearing at the Empire and Tivoli, London, in gesture songs.’
(The New York Dramatic Mirror, New York, Saturday, 19 December 1908, p.5c)

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January 10, 2013

Lucia Nola (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American soprano
(photo: Baker Art Gallery, Columbus, Ohio, circa 1905)

Lucia Nola, a soprano from Washington, D.C., has joined the Roscian Opera Company, 1905
‘Miss Lucia Nola, who was for some years prominently identified with the local singers as a soprano, is now with the Roscian Opera Company as prima donna soprano. The operas being given by the company are Sousa’s El Capitan, Gilbert and Sullivan’s Mikado, Balfe’s Bohemian Girl, [Robert Planquette’s] Chimes of Normandy [i.e. Les Cloches de Corneville], and [Victor Herbert’s] The Serenade which the Bostonians made famous. Miss Nola is heard in all the leading roles. She has hots of friends in this city, who will be interested to known of her success. Her work in Washington was characterized by a large amount of charitable work, such as the singing in the hospitals and the jail, and she did much other philanthropic work. She was a prominent and active member of the Doubleday Sunday Night Club.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 15 October 1905, Part Two, Editorial Section, p. 10a)

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January 10, 2013

Lucia Nola (fl. late 19th/early 20th Century),
American soprano
(photo: Baker Art Gallery, Columbus, Ohio, circa 1905)

Lucia Nola, a soprano from Washington, D.C., has joined the Roscian Opera Company, 1905
‘Miss Lucia Nola, who was for some years prominently identified with the local singers as a soprano, is now with the Roscian Opera Company as prima donna soprano. The operas being given by the company are Sousa’s El Capitan, Gilbert and Sullivan’s Mikado, Balfe’s Bohemian Girl, [Robert Planquette’s] Chimes of Normandy [i.e. Les Cloches de Corneville], and [Victor Herbert’s] The Serenade which the Bostonians made famous. Miss Nola is heard in all the leading roles. She has hots of friends in this city, who will be interested to known of her success. Her work in Washington was characterized by a large amount of charitable work, such as the singing in the hospitals and the jail, and she did much other philanthropic work. She was a prominent and active member of the Doubleday Sunday Night Club.’
(The Washington Post, Washington, D.C., Sunday, 15 October 1905, Part Two, Editorial Section, p. 10a)