Posts Tagged ‘The Lady of Lyons (play)’

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Adelaide Neilson

August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress

August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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August 7, 2013

Adelaide Neilson (née Elizabeth Ann Brown, 1847-1880), English actress
(photo: The London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, late 1860s)

‘The Career of a Noted Actress.
‘From the Balto. Sun.
‘Miss Lilian Adaline [sic] Neilson [i.e Adelaide Neilson], the actress, whose sudden death in Paris, France, Sunday last, has been announced, was born at Saragossa, Spain, March 4, 1850. Her father was a Spaniard and her mother the daughter of an English clergyman. She was educated in England, had some knowledge of the Latin classics, of English literature, French, and was a fair performer on the piano. [But see Wikipedia Her first appearance on the stage was at Margate, England, while yet a child. She was brought out in London at the New Royalty Theatre in July, 1865, in the character of Juliet, which she afterword repeated about 1,200 times. She appeared at the Princess Thatre, London, in July, 1868, in the character of Gabrielle de Savigney, in The Huguenot Capatin, by Watts Phillips. In March, 1867, she played Nellie Armroyd, in Lost in London. In 1868, she appeared in Edinburgh in such parts as Rosalind in As You Like It, Pauline, in The Lady of Lyons, Julia, in The Hunchback, &c. She worked with incessant vigor, and one after another, it great rapidity, assumed leading feminine characters in as many new plays. Dr. Westland Marston wrote for her a piece called Life for Life [Lyceum, London, 6 March 1869], in which she impersonated the character of Lilian in a manner that won her great praise. She made a great hit in London as Amy Robsart in Kenilworth. After a tour of Great Britain she appeared in London at Drury lane, and made a brilliant local hit as Rosalind. Her career in America, from the time of her first appearance here in 1872 at Booth’s Theatre as Juliet, was a triumphal march wherever she chose to play. She paid a second visit to this country in 1874-75. She was again warmly welcomed. She made a third and a fourth visit to this country, entering upon her last engagement at New York in October of last year, and playing in all the principal cities of the country. Her eyes were dark brown, her complexion pale olive, her hairy ruddy brown, her voice rich, soft and melodious, and her physique graceful and healthful. She was once married to a Mr. Joseph Lee, of England. Recently her wardrobe was sold, it is said, in anticipation of her second marriage. Miss Neilson, however, was, according to the New York Times, privately married in London, last August, just before she sailed for America, to Mr. Edward Compton, the actor who supported her in her leading parts last season. The Times thinks this makes the disposition of her estate, supposed to be at least $200,000, irrespective of wardrobe and jewelry, a complicated and delicate one. It has been stated that the American divorce which she obtained from Mr. Lee in New York, in 1877, would not probably stand law in England. Should this turn out to be so, should no heirs of blood present themselves, and should it be ascertained that Mr. Lee has not since married, the question may lead to a long litigation between Mr. Lee and Mr. Compton, who will, of course, assert his claims, and Miss Neilson’s hard-earned fortune will probably be half consumed by the lawyers.’
(The Keystone Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Friday, 27 August 1880, p. 1f)

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January 11, 2013

Alice Marriott (Mrs Robert Edgar, 1824-1900),
English actress and manageress, as Hamlet,
which she first played at Sadler’s Wells, London, on 22 February 1864
(photo: C.B. Walker, 3 Pembridge Villas, London, probably 1864)

Alice Marriott as Hamlet at the Park Theatre, Brooklyn, April 1869
‘If Shakespeare could a-visit the glimpses of the moon and make a tour among our theatres, the most complete revolution of taste he would note would be in the position woman now holds on the stage. In the Augustan era of the drama, women were admitted to the theatre only as spectators. The heroines of the great bard were personated by men, and the play had often to wait till Ophelia shaved. Women have not only asserted their right to representation on the stage, but have invaded the province of the sterner sex, and play men’s parts. We may say, with some satisfaction that, outside of burlesque, women have with rare exceptions never attained to any encouraging success in male characters. The latest aspirant for honors outside of the legitimate business of her sex, is Miss Marriott, who came to this country a short time since, played a brief engagement in new York, and appeared last evening at the Park Theatre in Hamlet. The house was well filled and the lady was very cordially greeted on her entrance. Miss Marriott has a tall commanding figure and, in this role, a fine manly bearing, and she look the part of the youthful prince to perfection. From the words put in the mouth of Hamlet we gather the author’s idea of his physique, – when he says his uncle is ”no more like my father than I to Hercules.” We can hardly recognize this ideal in the robust figures of [Edwin] Forrest, [H.B.] Conway, or even [E.L.] Davenport. In the performance of the role, Miss Marriott trespasses on none of the stage traditions, and attempts no new reading, but she acts the part intelligently and well. She has a rich deep toned voice, and her elocution is admirable.
‘The support was uneven. Miss Louise Hawthorn made her re-appearance here as Ophelia. She looked as handsome and was just as inanimate as ever. Miss Wren played the Queen quite effectively. Mr. Harris adhered to the old stage conception of the Ghost, a solemn, impassive figure, who talks in a sepulchral monotone. This is considered the most impressive, but all you who ever seen it, prefer Mr. Conway’s reading of the part – making the Ghost talk like a sentient being. Mr. Lambe’s Gravedigger was excellent. Three new comers sustained the rather important roles of Caludius, Polonius and Laertes without adding anything to the brilliancy of the performance.
‘Miss Marriott will play Pauline in the The Lady of Lyons this evening. Miss Harris plays Claude.’
(Brooklyn Daily Eagle,, Brooklyn, New York, Tuesday, 20 April 1869, p.2f)