Posts Tagged ‘Victor Herbert’

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Kitty Gordon in Victor Herbert’s The Enchantress

June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING ”THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in ”The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. ”The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE ”BROKE”
”’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in ”The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
”’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ”The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,” said Kitty Gordon. ”Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of ”The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
””I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.”
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ”The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

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In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ‘(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING ”THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in ”The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. ”The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE ”BROKE”
”’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in ”The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
”’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ”The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,” said Kitty Gordon. ”Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of ”The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
””I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.”
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ”The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

* * * * *

In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ‘(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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June 26, 2013

Kitty Gordon (née Constance Minnie Blades,1878–1974), English actress and singer, as she appeared in The Enchantress, a musical comedy written for her by Victor Herbert. The production opened at the New York Theatre, New York, 19 October 1911, later transferring to the Grand Opera House, New York, 1 April 1912, before a United States tour
(photo: White, New York, 1911/12)

The Nixon Theatre, Pittsburgh, 28 October 1912
‘KITTY GORDON TO BRING “THE ENCHANTRESS.”
‘Beautiful Kitty Gordon who comes to the Nixton theater next week in “The Enchantress,” is said to wear some of the most wonderful gowns that have ever been seen on the stage. “The Enchantress” is rated by musical and dramatic critics as Victor Herbert’s masterpiece.
‘The English prima donna has never appeared to better advantage than in this colorful production and she is supported by a cast of stellar quality, including the charming dancer Nellie McCoy.’
(The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Sunday, 20 October 1912, Theatrical Section, p. 4c/d)

Cort Theatre, Los Angeles, October 1913
‘KITTY GORDON’S TROUPE “BROKE”
“’Enchantress” Fails in Los Angeles – Owes Star $6,000
‘LOS ANGELES, Oct. 31 [1912]. – As a result of the collapse of Kitty Gordon, the famous English actress, who has been playing a week’s engagement in “The Enchantress” here, the company has disbanded and will be returned to New York. Miss Gordon collapsed at the end of the first act.
‘Captain Beresford, her husband, says she has been on the verge of a breakdown for some time, and she insists on her taking a long rest.
‘KITTY MAKES STATEMENT.
“’There are many contradictory reports relative to the unfortunate affair which brought the engagement of ’’The Enchantress” to a close in Los Angeles,“ said Kitty Gordon. ’’Not being able to locate the producer, I am forced to protect myself with the truth.
”’The financial condition of theatricals is not responsible for the closing of “The Enchantress.” We have been supported well enough to continue, if the funds which have gone to the company had been competently handled in the New York office. The show would have been attached today had we continued our performance, and yet royalty money has been repeatedly sent to New York.
‘The money which was sent to New York for our railroad tickets has not been used for this purpose. I realized these facts nightly, and for the first time in my career as a star three weeks ago I accepted postponement for payment of my salary that the chorus and other members of the company who needed the money more than I might be paid.
‘THREE WEEKS’ SALARY DUE
“’’I have always received my money before the matinee started on Saturday, but during the last three weeks it has not been paid.
”’I have sacrificed my salary to help out my chorus, and today Gaieties’ theatrical office in New York owes me $6,000.“
‘From her bed Miss Gordon arranged this afternoon for an additional performance of ’’The Enchantress” to get money to transport the company to New York.’
(The San Francisco Call, Los Angeles, Friday, 31 October 1913, p. 1b)

* * * * *

In a recording made in 1911, Lucy Isabelle Marsh sings ’(To The) Land of My Own Romance,’ one of Victor Herbert’s songs from The Enchantress, originally sung by Kitty Gordon. Another version was made in 1938 by Richard Tauber. In 1912, Victor Herbert’s Orchestra made a recording of a selection of music from The Enchantress.

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Vera Neville

June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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Vera Neville, English actress and mother-in-law of the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee

June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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June 20, 2013

Vera Neville (née Vera Blanche Neville Snepp, 1888-1953), English actress
(photo: Rita Martin, London, circa 1908)

Vera Neville was the daughter of Alfred Neville Snepp (1857-1935), an electrician and later a cigarette manufacturer, and his wife Laura Kate (née Browne, 1861-1941) who were married at All Souls Church, Marylebone, London, on 1 December 1887. Her paternal grandfather was the Rev. Edward Snepp (1827-1899), sometime vicar of St. Paul’s Church, Kings Cross, Halifax, Yorkshire.

In 1909 Vera Neville was married to ‘Tommy’ Graves (Henry Algernon Claude Graves, 1877-1963), who became 7th Baron Graves of Gravesend upon the death of his cousin in 1937. Their son was the actor Peter Graves (1911-1994) whose wife was the actress and singer, Vanessa Lee (1920-1992). Following Miss Neville’s divorce in 1922 from Graves she married in the same year Philip Ernest Hill (1873-1944), the successful property developer and financier, from whom she was divorced in 1933.

The details of Miss Neville’s introduction to the theatre are as yet unknown apart from the fact that one of her earliest engagements was as understudy to Gabrielle Ray. Her first substantial part appears to have been as Perlie in Grossmith and Laurillard’s production of Victor Herbert’s musical play The Only Girl, which opened at the Apollo Theatre, London, on 25 September 1915. She was next seen in Mr Manhattan, a musical play which was produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 30 March 1916; and then in the comedy with music Houp La! (St. Martin’s Theatre, London, 23 November 1916), starring Nat. D. Ayer and Gertie Millar. Her next engagement was in the ‘War Economy Revue’ £150 (Ambassadors’ Theatre, London, 30 April 1917); and then finally in A Certain Liveliness (St. Martin’s, 17 February 1919), a play by Basil Macdonald Hastings.

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Laura Joyce Bell

April 22, 2013

a carte de viste photograph of Laura Joyce Bell (1858-1904), American actress and singer in comic opera before her marriage in 1883 to Digby Bell
(photo: Sarony, New York, circa 1878)

‘Notwithstanding the decree of the New York Court, which granted a decree of divorce to Mrs. Digby Bell and prohibited the husband from marrying again, that gentleman made his appearance at a Chicago hotel on Sunday with a new wife, known to the stage as Miss Laura Joyce, who was herself divorced a short time ago from James V. Taylor, a wealthy New Yorker. Bell and Miss Joyce were married in Pennsylvania.’
(Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur, Illinois, Saturday, 17 March 1883, p. 2d)

‘Haverly’s Theatre, Chester, Pennsylvania, January 1885.
‘Monday evening the McCaull Opera Company will present Gilbert & Sullivan’s esthetic [sic] opera Patience in a brilliant manner, with new scenery, a large and thoroughly drilled chorus, and the following cast: J.H. Ryley will be Bunthorne; Digby Bell, Grosvenor; C.W. Dongan, Colonel Calverley; George Roseman, Major Murgatroyd; George R. Appleby, the Duke; Mary Beebe, Patience; Irene Perry, Lady Angela; Emma Ellsner, Lady Saphir; and that pronounced favorite, Laura Joyce Bell, the massive Lady Jane.
‘In this series of revival Manager McCaull has determined to produce the operas in the very best possible manner, selecting from his various companies those artists who are best adapted for the different roles. The present company could not be surpassed, all being especially fitted from their respective parts.’
(Chester Times, Chester, Pennsylvania, Monday, 12 January 1885, p. 3b)

Grand Opera House, San Antonio, Texas, 31 December 1896
‘Tonight and Tomorrow Matinee and Night.
‘Hoyt’s greatest comedy, A Midnight Bell, which portrays more accurately than any other of its rivals, the charms, sweetness and fragrance of New England life, will be presented in this city shortly with an ideal cast of metropolitan favorites, headed by America’s foremost comedian, Dibgy Bell, and the famous comedienne, Laura Joyce Bell. An entire carload of scenery has been painted by the celebrated artist, Arthur Voegtlin. New music has been specially arranged by Victor Herbert, author of Prince Ananias and The Wizard of the Nile and leader of Gilmore’s famous band.’
(San Antonio Daily Light, San Antonio, Texas, Thursday, 31 December 1896, p. 5a)

‘DEATH OF SINGER.
Laura Joyce Bell Once Popular Comic Opera Star.
‘Chicago, May 30 [1904]. – Announcement from new York city yesterday of the death of Mrs. Laura Joyce Bell, the comic opera singer, saddened scores of theatrical people who had known her when she was in the height of her popularity and success.
‘Mrs. Bell was the wife of Digby Bell, the vaudeville star.
‘Mrs. Bell had been ill for nearly a year. She suffered from fatty degeneration of the heart.
‘Laura Joyce Maskell was born in England. She received her musical education at the Royal Academy of Music, London. Her first appearance in America was in Niblo’s Garden in New York in 1872. In 1882 she was married to Digby Bell. Mrs. Bell was 46 years old.’
(The Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, Monday, 30 May 1904, p. 3d)

‘LAURA JOYCE BELL CUTS OFF DAUGHTER
‘Because the Girl Ran Off and Got Married.
‘New York, Oct. 21. – ”I give and bequeath to my daughter, Laura Seymour Bell, for her sole support and separate use, $1.” In these words Laura Joyce Bell, the actress, wife of Digby Bell, by her will, cut off her daughter from participation in her estate except as stated. The will was drawn may 3, 1904. Only a short time before that Miss Bell eloped from the normal college on the eve of her graduation and was married, her name now being Wilson.’
(The Daily Review, Decatur, Illinois, Friday, 21 October 1904, p. 1c)

For further photographs of Laura Joyce Bell, see NYPLDigitalGallery and University of Louisville, Digital Collections.