Posts Tagged ‘Willie Warde’

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Fred Aretlli

April 25, 2013

a carte de visite photograph of Fred Artelli (fl. 1870s-1890s), ballet dancer and Harlequin
(photo: T.J. Tungate, 35 Queen Street, Edgware Road, London, circa 1875, negative number 1504)

Theatre Royal, Liverpool
‘To make way for novelties which are certain to please ”Royal” patrons, Humpty Dumpty has signified that he will shortly quit the sphere of his prosperous career at the patent Theatre. The lovely scenery, lively business, and talented company have contributed in a large measure to the success of the Pantomime, and the author (Mr J.F. M’Ardle) has displayed an ingenuity in connection with its construction which cannot be too highly praised. His peculiar ”Argument,” like the ancient ”Chorus,” is worth reproducing, and is to the following effect:- ”There was seen a great stone, and in ye midst thereof was like an anvil of steel, and therein stack a fair sword naked by ye point, and letters there were written in gold about ye sword that said thusly:- ‘Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone is rightwise kind born of all England!’ Then ye people marvelled muchly, and all ye knithts and ye squires went to behld ye stone and ye sword. And when they say ye scripture some assayed, such as would have been king. But none mote stir ye sword nor move it. ‘Marry come up, beshrew my heart, i’ fackins, by my halidame,’ exclaimed Arthur, ’ I shall gette that sworde, or, as ye manne in ye playe sayeth, I will perish in ye attempt.’ Accordingly, he dydde get ye sworde from ye stone, and he overcame ye villaine Surlichurl, and ye wicked Impe, yclept Humpty Dumpty, and married ye Lady Guinevere, ye king’s daughter, and Arthur’s sweethearte, and, like all ye folkes who gette married, they lived happy ever afterwards. (For all ye further particulars see ye Small Bills, and ye Grande Pantomime itself. N.B. – Ye children in arms not admitted by themselves.)” The Harlequinade is of the most bustling kind, the principals being Madame Elise (Columbine), Miss E. Rowella (Harlequin à la Watteau), Signor Artelli (Harlequin), Mr A. Bolton and Mr E. Burgess Pantaloons), the De Castro troupe (Sprites, and Dolph Rowella and the Great Little Rowella (Clowns).’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 4 February 1877, p. 8d)

‘ROYAL PARK THEATRE.
‘Great Success every Evening of
‘SIGNOR FRED. ARTELLI’S COMIC BALLET TROUPE. At Liberty for Fetes and Galas. For terms, address, Mr GEORGE HADLIEGE HUNT, Park Theatre, Camden-town.’
(The Era, London, Sunday, 6 May 1877, p. 15b)

‘MR EDITOR. – Sir, – will you allow me to state that, owing to the illness of Mr Willie Warde, the part of Rapless, the oofless swell, in Round the Town, at the Empire, Leicester-square, has been played for some considerable time by, yours faithfully, FRED. ARTELLI
‘Empire Theatre, June 6th, 1893.’
(The Era, London, Saturday, 10 June 1893, p. 17c)

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For references to Artelli’s appearances at the Empire Theatre, Leicester Square, London, during the 1890s, see Ivor Guest, Ballet in Leicester Square, Dance Books, London, 1992.

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February 2, 2013

Louie Sherrington (fl. 1860S/1870s)
English music hall singer and serio-comic
as she sang ‘The Dancing Belle’,
also sung by Kate Garstone, Harriett Coveney and Emma Alford.

‘Yes! They call me the dancing belle,
A fact you may all see well,
The way I now dance, you’ll see at a glance
That I am the dancing belle.’

(song sheet cover with lithograph portrait of Miss Sherrington
by Alfred Concanen, probably after a photograph,
printed by Siere & Burnitt, published by C. Sheard, London, mid 1860s)

‘Of the tavern concert-rooms [in London], one of the earliest to burst its chrysalis state, and emerge into the full-grown music hall, was the Grapes, in the Southwark Bridge Road. This establishment was also one of the first to style itself a music hall in the modern sense of the term, and under the description of the Surrey Music Hall was well known to pleasure-seekers early in the [eighteen] forties. The hall, which was prettily decorated, was capable to seating as many as a thousand persons, and in the upper hall might be seen a valuable collection of pictures, which the enterprising proprietor, Mr. Richard Preece, had secured from M. Phillips, a French artist whom he was instrumental into introducing to the British public. The hall was provided with an excellent orchestra under the direction of Mr Zéluti, while the arduous position of manage was filled with great credit by Mr T. Norris. The clever Vokes Family were among the many well-known entertainers who appeared here. The company here used on an average to cost about £30 a week. Louie Sherrington sang here on many occasions, and Willie and Emma Warde were very successful in their song “The Gingham Umbrella,” besides whom Pat P. Fannin, a smart dancer, and Mr and Mrs Jack Carroll, negro banjoists and dancers, were rare favourites with its patrons.’
(Charles Douglas Stewart and A.J. Park, The Variety Stage, T. Fisher Unwin, London, 1895, pp. 47 and 48)

* * * * * * * *

‘Early women stars were Georgina Smithson, Louie Sherrington and Annie Adams. The last two were contemporaries and mostly sang versions of the songs of Vance and Leybourne, adapted for women. For instance, “Up In A Balloon, Boys,” became “Up In A Balloon, Girls.” Louie Sherrington was a very lovely women with a delightful voice; a predecessor of Florrie Forde, Annie Adams was of the majestic type then so admired, she was “a fine woman” – there was a lot of her, with a bust to match. With her very powerful voice, rich personality, a jolly, laughing face and manner, she banged her songs across the footlights and made the house rise at her.’
(W. Macqueen Pope, The Melodies Linger On, W.H. Allen, London, 1950, p. 314)

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February 2, 2013

Louie Sherrington (fl. 1860S/1870s)
English music hall singer and serio-comic
as she sang ‘The Dancing Belle’,
also sung by Kate Garstone, Harriett Coveney and Emma Alford.

‘Yes! They call me the dancing belle,
A fact you may all see well,
The way I now dance, you’ll see at a glance
That I am the dancing belle.’

(song sheet cover with lithograph portrait of Miss Sherrington
by Alfred Concanen, probably after a photograph,
printed by Siere & Burnitt, published by C. Sheard, London, mid 1860s)

‘Of the tavern concert-rooms [in London], one of the earliest to burst its chrysalis state, and emerge into the full-grown music hall, was the Grapes, in the Southwark Bridge Road. This establishment was also one of the first to style itself a music hall in the modern sense of the term, and under the description of the Surrey Music Hall was well known to pleasure-seekers early in the [eighteen] forties. The hall, which was prettily decorated, was capable to seating as many as a thousand persons, and in the upper hall might be seen a valuable collection of pictures, which the enterprising proprietor, Mr. Richard Preece, had secured from M. Phillips, a French artist whom he was instrumental into introducing to the British public. The hall was provided with an excellent orchestra under the direction of Mr Zéluti, while the arduous position of manage was filled with great credit by Mr T. Norris. The clever Vokes Family were among the many well-known entertainers who appeared here. The company here used on an average to cost about £30 a week. Louie Sherrington sang here on many occasions, and Willie and Emma Warde were very successful in their song “The Gingham Umbrella,” besides whom Pat P. Fannin, a smart dancer, and Mr and Mrs Jack Carroll, negro banjoists and dancers, were rare favourites with its patrons.’
(Charles Douglas Stewart and A.J. Park, The Variety Stage, T. Fisher Unwin, London, 1895, pp. 47 and 48)

* * * * * * * *

‘Early women stars were Georgina Smithson, Louie Sherrington and Annie Adams. The last two were contemporaries and mostly sang versions of the songs of Vance and Leybourne, adapted for women. For instance, “Up In A Balloon, Boys,” became “Up In A Balloon, Girls.” Louie Sherrington was a very lovely women with a delightful voice; a predecessor of Florrie Forde, Annie Adams was of the majestic type then so admired, she was “a fine woman” – there was a lot of her, with a bust to match. With her very powerful voice, rich personality, a jolly, laughing face and manner, she banged her songs across the footlights and made the house rise at her.’
(W. Macqueen Pope, The Melodies Linger On, W.H. Allen, London, 1950, p. 314)

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The Four Amaranths, acrobatic dancers

January 18, 2013

the Four Amaranths
(Mary, Tina, Jennie and Hannah, fl. early 20th Century),
acrobatic dancers (photo: unknown, circa 1915)

This hand tinted real photograph postcard, photographer and publisher uncredited, dates from about 1910. For reference to the Four Amaranths’ appearances in New York between 1915 and 1920, see the Internet Broadway Database.

‘FOUR AMARANTHS
‘A quartette of graceful lady acrobatic dancers. Some act.’
(The Wisconsin State Journal, Madison, Wisconsin, 23 February 1915, p. 6f, advertisement)

Keith’s, Philadelphia, PA, week beginning 23 April 1917
‘… The pretty dancing turn of Hooper and Marbury got something more than usual in the opening position. Both are good dancers, and pretty stage setting and costuming help get the act over in good shape. A dancing act of another kind – that of the Four Amaranths, who mix acrobatics with their stopping, closed the vaudeville bill, and the girls did very well without showing anything new.’
(Variety, New York, Friday, 27 April 1917, pp. 48D/49a)

The Amaranths troupe was originally composed of three sisters, known as the Three Amaranths (otherwise the Sisters Amaranth). They appeared in the musical play, The Cingalee; or, Sunny Ceylon, which was produced at Daly’s Theatre, London, on 5 March 1904. Their Perahara Dances were intended to enrich the exotic setting of the piece. ‘One of the most striking features in The Cingalee is the devil dancing by the Sisters Amaranth, who were greatly applauded by the Queen [Alexandra] on the first night.’ Other members of the cast included Hayden Coffin, Rutland Barrington, Fred Kaye, Huntley Wright, Sybil Arundale, Gracie Leigh, Carrie Moore and Isabel Jay, together with the dancers Loku Banda, Willie Warde and Topsy Sinden.