Posts Tagged ‘Zena Dare’

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Zena Dare advertises the De Nevers Rubber Tyre Co., London, 1904

March 14, 2014

Zena Dare (1887-1975), English actress, featured in an advertisement for the De Nevers Rubber Tyre Co., London, 1904
(photo: unknown, probably London, 1904)

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Seymour Hicks, Ellaline Terriss and Zena Dare in The Beauty of Bath, London, 1906

November 14, 2013

(above) a Rotary Photographic Co Ltd postcard photograph (1597Q) of Mr and Mrs Seymour Hicks (Ellaline Terriss) as they appeared respectively as Lieut. Richard Alington and the Hon. Betty Silverthorne in the musical play, The Beauty of Bath, which opened at the Aldwych Theatre, London, on 19 March 1906.
(below) a Rotary Photographic Co Ltd postcard photograph (4040Z) of the same taken at the same sitting but with Zena Dare‘s face replacing that of Miss Terriss.
(main photos: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1906; artwork by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd)

The second postcard may be explained by the fact that Zena Dare succeeded Ellaline Terriss in the part of the Hon. Betty Silverthorne during the run, which, the production having transferred to the Hicks Theatre on 27 December 1906, ended on 23 February 1907.

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three postcards of Zena Dare

October 24, 2013

Zena Dare (1887-1975), English actress
(photo: Bassano, London, circa 1905/06)

Three postcards of Zena Dare published about 1905/06 by The Rapid Photo Printing Co Ltd, London; the centre, real photograph postcard, numbered 2523, the others are coloured and gilt halftones.

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Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, London Hippodrome, 1909

August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, London Hippodrome, November 1909

August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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August 11, 2013

Maurice Farkoa and Zena Dare in Franz Lehár’s one act operetta
Mitislaw; or, The Love Match, billed as ‘A Delightful Miniature Viennese Opera,’ London Hippodrome, November 1909
(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1909)

Mitislaw; or, The Love Match was the English version of Lehár’s Mitislaw der moderne, the book and lyrics by Fritz Grünbaum and Robert Bodanzky, which was first produced at the Hölle cabaret theatre, Berlin, on 5 January 1907.

‘Mr. Maurice Farkoa as Prince Mitislaw and Miss Zena Dare as Princess Amaranth, in a scene from this dainty opera, wherein the love affairs of the Prince are set forth to an accompaniment of charming music by Franz Lehár.’ Other members of the cast were Florence Wood as Tina and John Le Hay as The Chancellor.
(The Throne and Country, London, Saturday, 11 December 1909, p.542)

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Lily Elsie, Gabrielle Ray, Zena Dare and Grace Pinder, 1906

August 9, 2013

Lily Elsie (1886-1962), Gabrielle Ray (1883-1973), Zena Dare (1887-1975), English musical comedy actresses, and Grace Pinder (1884-1932), Canadian-born English musical comedy actress, in an episode from their song, ‘I Should So Love to be a Boy,’ written by C.H. Bovill, with music by Frank E. Tours, from the The Little Cherub, produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 13 January 1906.
(photo: Bassano, London, 1906)

Girls have a rotten time! –
There’s not the slightest doubt of it!
Boys have sport
Of every sort,
But we are always out of it!

I should so love to be a boy!
I’d wear check suits
And big brown boots,
Then I could ride
A horse astride;
If only I were built that way!

No girl who has to wear
A corset to support her back
Can hope to play
At ‘footer,’ eh?
And be a great three-quarter back!
(published by Chappell & Co Ltd, 1906)

‘FOOTBALL ON THE STAGE.
‘The national love of football is the subject of a song incident in The Little Cherub at the Prince of Wale’s Theatre, where a quartette of pretty girls sing ”I Should Love to be a Boy.”
‘When the piece was first produced a few weeks ago the four girls threw a football to and fro on the stage, but now they go in for tackling and Miss Gabrielle Ray brings the incident to a close by kicking the football into the auditorium.
‘Miss Ray usually aims at getting the ball into one of the private boxes on the ”prompt” side of the house, and generally brings off a goal. Frequently, however, it rebounds into the stalls, and is tossed back to the stage, occasionally shaking up the musical director by catching him on the head. Some nights the light-footed kicker sends the ball into the pit. She is afterwards met at the stage-door by the lucky finder of the ball, and she writes her name on it. The finder retains the ball as a souvenir.’
(Daily Mail, London, Tuesday, 20 March 1906, p. 5f)