Archive for January, 2015

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Anna Hana, American vaudeville comedienne and singer

January 28, 2015

Anna Hana (active 1912-1935), American vaudeville comedienne and singer. She was married to the American comic juggler, ‘The Great Wieland.
(postcard photo: Relph & Co, photographers, 130A Church Street, Preston, Lancashire, England, circa 1913)

‘RICKARDS’ VAUDEVILLE REOPENS TO-NIGHT.
‘Rickards’ vaudeville will re-open in Perth to-night at the Tivoli Theatre… . Anna Hana, is announces as a ”charming American girl,” but she is something more than that – she is a very accomplished artist, and has won high encomiums in the Eastern States.’
(The Daily News, Perth, Western Australia, Saturday, 7 November 1914, p. 9b)

‘If Clothes Make the Man now much more do they make the woman, especially the vaudeville artist? Everybody recognises that, and the majority of vaudeville performers nowadays strive to excel in dress. Miss Anna Hana is one who pays great attention to her gowns. They are never out of her mind, and whenever she travels they are her one and only thought. It is remarkable, she said the other evening at the Tivoli Theatre [Perth], when discussing the matter, ow easily a box containing the most important part of the wardrobe can get astray. In South Africa, on her way to Australia, she had a narrow escape of losing all her baggage, and her life also. She was travelling from Johannesburg to Cape-town, when the rear end of the train when over an embankment at Hex River. The carriages which were derailed contained soldiers going to the front, and seventeen were killed and fifty-seven injured. Luckily for Miss Hana, she was in the front of the train with her luggage.’
(The Daily News, Perth, Western Australia, Friday, 13 November 1914, p. 7a)

‘One of the most popular artists who ever went over to London from the United States was Anna Hana, who is now at the Tivoli Theatre [Sydney]. Although born in Chicago, she is of English parentage, and spent most of her girlhood in England. She developed into a vaudeville star in America. Four years ago she went to London to fulfil an engagement made some time before, and had the good luck to strike the world’s metropolis at the time when ragtime was just beginning to boom. She was practically the first woman to introduce the syncopated melodies to London, and she immediately caught on.’
(The Sunday Times, Sydney, New South Wales, Sunday, 6 December 1914, p. 6e)

‘The Great Wieland, American comic juggler, and his wife, Anna Hana, comedienne, are sailing for South Africa to be gone nearly a year.’
(The Vaudeville News, New York, Saturday, 3 February 1923, p. 10a)

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January 25, 2015

Zarmo (Joseph Henry Zarmo, 1868/69-after 1926), international juggler and equilibrist. Zarmo so impressed the young Charlie Chaplin that the latter recalled his perfectionism and performing skills in his Autobiography, first published in 1964.
(cabinet photo: J.B. Wilson, 389 State Street, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1893)

‘ZARMO, a clever and noted juggler, closed with M.B. Leavitt’s “Spider and Fly” Co. March 8th in the Northwest and has returned to town. Zarmo is an exceptionally skilful equilibrist performing very difficult feats in jugglery which balancing himself head downwards on the top of a champagne bottle. He is an industrious worker and is whiling away his odd moments in practising a new act on the sensational order.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 1 April 1893, p. 50d)

‘JOSEPH H. ZARMO has sailed for England, where he is under contract at the Empire Theatre [Leicester Square], London.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 25 November 1893, p. 608d)

‘NOTICE.
Just Arrived, per S.S. St. Paul. America’s Favorite, Europe’s Surprise, London’s Success. ZARMO. ZARMO JUGGLES ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING.
ZARMO, the Quaint.
ZARMO, the Balancer.
ZARMO, the Inventor.
ZARMO, the Dancer.
ZARMO, the Comique.
ZARMO, the Droll.
ZARMO, the Inverted.
ZARMO, the Eccentric.
ZARMO, the Wonderful.
ZARMO, the Hit.
ZARMO, the Only Real Funny JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only upside down JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only burlesque JUGGLER
ZARMO, the new grotesque JUGGLER
‘Is all his latest comic creations, including the Three Headed Boxing Novelty, the funniest thing extant; the laughing success of THE CENTURY. Week commencing Dec. 23 [1895], starring at Tony Pastor’s Theatre, New York City; Jan. 13 [1896], Keith’s, Philadelphia; Jan. 20, Keith’s, Boston; Feb. 10, Keith’s Union Square Theatre, New York. ZARMO HAS A FEW IMMEDIATE VACANT DATES. Proprietors in search of a novelty will do well to secure this set at once.
‘ZARMO, 107 Fourth Avenue, New York City. N.B. – COME AND LAUGH.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 21 December 1895, p. 672c, advertisement)

‘OUR LONDON LETTER… 16 June [1906]
‘Zarmo, who is as well known in America as he is in this country, is thinking of paying a visit to the States, after an absence of eight years. He played three seasons with the Tony Pastor road show, besides appearing in the best vaudeville houses. Zarmo tells me that he has never ceased practising since he returned from his last trip to America, and has now the juggling game down to a fine point.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 30 June 1906, p. e)

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Zarmo, international juggler and equilibrist

January 25, 2015

Zarmo (Joseph Henry Zarmo, 1868/69-after 1926), international juggler and equilibrist. Zarmo so impressed the young Charlie Chaplin that the latter recalled his perfectionism and performing skills in his Autobiography, first published in 1964.
(cabinet photo: J.B. Wilson, 389 State Street, Chicago, Illinois, circa 1893)

‘ZARMO, a clever and noted juggler, closed with M.B. Leavitt’s ”Spider and Fly” Co. March 8th in the Northwest and has returned to town. Zarmo is an exceptionally skilful equilibrist performing very difficult feats in jugglery which balancing himself head downwards on the top of a champagne bottle. He is an industrious worker and is whiling away his odd moments in practising a new act on the sensational order.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 1 April 1893, p. 50d)

‘JOSEPH H. ZARMO has sailed for England, where he is under contract at the Empire Theatre [Leicester Square], London.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 25 November 1893, p. 608d)

‘NOTICE.
Just Arrived, per S.S. St. Paul. America’s Favorite, Europe’s Surprise, London’s Success. ZARMO. ZARMO JUGGLES ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING.
ZARMO, the Quaint.
ZARMO, the Balancer.
ZARMO, the Inventor.
ZARMO, the Dancer.
ZARMO, the Comique.
ZARMO, the Droll.
ZARMO, the Inverted.
ZARMO, the Eccentric.
ZARMO, the Wonderful.
ZARMO, the Hit.
ZARMO, the Only Real Funny JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only upside down JUGGLER
ZARMO, the only burlesque JUGGLER
ZARMO, the new grotesque JUGGLER
‘Is all his latest comic creations, including the Three Headed Boxing Novelty, the funniest thing extant; the laughing success of THE CENTURY. Week commencing Dec. 23 [1895], starring at Tony Pastor’s Theatre, New York City; Jan. 13 [1896], Keith’s, Philadelphia; Jan. 20, Keith’s, Boston; Feb. 10, Keith’s Union Square Theatre, New York. ZARMO HAS A FEW IMMEDIATE VACANT DATES. Proprietors in search of a novelty will do well to secure this set at once.
‘ZARMO, 107 Fourth Avenue, New York City. N.B. – COME AND LAUGH.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 21 December 1895, p. 672c, advertisement)

‘OUR LONDON LETTER… 16 June [1906]
‘Zarmo, who is as well known in America as he is in this country, is thinking of paying a visit to the States, after an absence of eight years. He played three seasons with the Tony Pastor road show, besides appearing in the best vaudeville houses. Zarmo tells me that he has never ceased practising since he returned from his last trip to America, and has now the juggling game down to a fine point.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 30 June 1906, p. e)

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Martin Harvey and cast in a scene from Don Juan’s Last Wager, Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, 1900

January 24, 2015

John Martin Harvey (1863-1944), English actor-manager, as Don Juan Tenorio, and members of the cast in the supper scene in Mrs Cunningham Graham’s romantic play, Don Juan’s Last Wager (based on José Zorrilla’s 1844 play, Don Juan Tenorio), which was first produced at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre, London, on 27 February 1900. The piece was not a success and was withdrawn after 30 performances.
(photo: London Stereoscopic & Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1900)

‘GREEN ROOM GOSSIP… .
‘Mr. Martin Harvey, acting on the advice of his doctor, will conclude from run of ”Don Juan’s Last Wager” at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre on Saturday next [31 March 1900]. Mr Harvey continues to be the tenant of the theatre until the end of July at least, and he hopes to produce towards the middle of May the ”triple bill” of which we have spoken. Meanwhile, at Easter, Mr. Harvey will revive a comedy not quite fresh to the theatre, in which he himself will not appear.’
(Daily Mail, London, Wednesday, 28 March 1900, p. 8a)

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Gertrude Glyn as she appeared as Sonia during the run of The Merry Widow, Daly’s Theatre, London, 1907-1909

January 23, 2015

Gertrude Glyn (1886-1965), English musical comedy actress, as she appeared as understudy to Lily Elsie in the role of Sonia during the first London run of The Merry Widow, produced at Daly’s Theatre, Leicester Square, on 8 June 1907 and closed on 31 July 1909.
(photo: Bassano, London, probably 1908 or 1909; postcard no. 1792M in the Rotary Photographic Series, published by the Rotary Photographic Co Ltd, London, 1908 or 1909)

Gertrude Glyn began her career in 1901 at the age of 15 with Seymour Hicks when he cast her in one of the minor roles in the ‘musical dream,’ Bluebell in Fairyland (Vaudeville Theatre, London, 18 December 1901), of which he and his wife, Ellaline Terriss were the stars. Miss Glyn was subsequently under contract to George Edwardes, appearing in supporting roles at the Gaiety and Daly’s theatres in London and where she was also one of several understudies to both Gabrielle Ray and Lily Elsie. She also seen from time to time in other United Kingdom cities. Her appearances at Daly’s in The Merry Widow, The Dollar Princess (1909-10), A Waltz Dream (1911), and The Count of Luxembourg (1911-12) were followed during 1912 or 1913 by her taking the role of Lady Babby in Gipsy Love (also played during the run by Avice Kelham and Constance Drever), in succession to Gertie Millar.

On 10 April 1914, Gertrude Glyn and Elsie Spain sailed from London aboard the SS Otway bound for Sydney, Australia. Their first appearances there were at Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, on 6 June that year in Gipsy Love in which they took the parts respectively of Lady Babby and Ilona, the latter first played in London by Sari Petrass.

Gipsy Love, Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney, 6 June 1914
‘A thoroughly artistic performance is that offered by Miss Gertrude Glyn, another newcomer, in the role of Lady Babby. Although her singing voice is not a strong point in her equipment of talent, this actress artistically makes one forget this fact in admiration for the skilful interpretation of her lines and lyrics, and also the gracefulness of her dancing and movements. Another point of excellence about Miss Glyn’s work is that she acts easily and naturally, always keeping well within the pictures and confines of the character she impersonates.’
(The Referee, Sydney, NSW, Wednesday, 17 June 1914, p. 15c)

Gertrude Glyn’s last appearances were as Lady Playne in succession to Madeline Seymour and Mary Ridley in Paul Rubens’s musical play, Betty, which began its long run at Daly’s Theatre, London, on 24 April 1915 and ended on 8 April 1916.

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Gertrude Glyn’s real name was Gertrude Mary Rider. She was the youngest daughter of James Gray (or Grey) Rider (1847/49-1900), a civil servant, and his wife, Elizabeth. She was baptised on 24 October 1886 at St. Mark’s, Hanwell, Middlesex. She married in 1918.
‘CAPTAIN BULTEEL and MISS GERTRUDE GLYN (RIDER).
‘The marriage arranged between Captain Walter Beresford Bulteel, Scottish Horse, youngest son of the late John Bulteel, of Pamflete, Devon, and Gertrude Mary Glyn (Rider), youngest daughter of the late James Grey Rider, and of Mrs. Rider, 6, Windsor Court, Bayswater, will take place at St. Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge, on Thursday, May 9, at 2.30.’
(The Times, London, 7 May 1918, p. 9c)
Bulteel, one of whose maternal great grandfathers was Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (1764-1845), was born in 1873 and died in 1952; his wife (Gertrude Glyn) died on 16 October 1965.

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seaside entertainers in blackface, New Brighton, Merseyside, late 1890s

January 20, 2015

seaside entertainers in blackface near Ham and Egg Parade, New Brighton, Wirral Peninsula, Cheshire
(photo: from a stereocard in The S.P. Series of Stereoscopic Gems, England, probably late 1890s; the original caption reads: ‘NIGGERS NEW BRIGHTON’)

‘It is a curious place, this New Brighton, a lesser Blackpool, with its promenade pier and lofty tower. The fort which stands beside the lighthouse on a red rock is far more picturesque than effective; the Mersey defences are not impregnable, but a hostile fleet at the mercy of a few torpedo-boats would be in considerable difficulties if the buoys were removed from the intricate channels of Liverpool Bay. As a watering-place New Brighton is hardly a success; Lancashire trippers do bathe here, but one must walk far to get knee-deep. There is, however, much healthy paddling going on, both young and old gloating in the cool, though somewhat Liverpool-stained water. Donkey- and horse-riding is a great source of amusement, especially to spectators, and then there is all the attraction of the pier. There is a promenade, too, other than the pier; “Ham and Egg Terrace” is its name. Coy maidens lure the pleasure-seeker to enter their gaudy saloons, where oysters, shrimps, aerated waters, and other luxuries may be partaken of, but at one and all the stock dish, the bonne bouche is ham and eggs. Do not inquire where the eggs come from. There are other entertainments on the Terrace; you can have your photograph taken and printed while you wait, with appropriate comments thrown in during the operation anent your sweetheart, varied of course according to the sex of the victim. Then there are penny gaffs, menageries, peep-shows, performing dogs and boxing cats, ventriloquists, and all the other charms of the tripper’s seaside resort.’
(T.A. Coward, Picturesque Cheshire, Manchester, 1904, p. 251)

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Sophie Eyre, Irish born actress, photographed by Sarony, New York, circa 1885

January 18, 2015

Sophie Eyre (1853?-1892), Irish born dramatic Actress
(cabinet photo: Sarony, New York, circa 1885)

‘THE LATE SOPHIE EYRE
‘The death is announced at Naples, Italy, Nov. 5 [1892], of Sophie Eyre, the well known leading lady. She had been sojourning in that city, and succumbed to an attack of heart disease. Six years ago, Sophie Eyre told THE CLIPPER the story of her life. She was born Sophia Lillian Ryan, at Tipperary, Ire., about 1857, and was the daughter of Maj. Ryan. At the age of seventeen she married Maj. Lonsdale, of the Seventh English Hussars, and went with her husband to India, where, at nineteen, she became a widow. Returning to England, she followed an inclination, which, in an amateur way, had manifested itself while she was quite young, and adopted the stage. Her first professional appearance was made at the Theatre Royal, Portsmouth, Eng., in a small part, and she remained at that house six months. Then she went on a provincial tour in ”Diplomacy,” playing Zicka. The following season she made another tour of the English provinces, doing the lead and playing at all the principal theatres of Great Britain outside of London. The Summer of that year she filled in with the stock at the Torquay Theatre. About May, 1882, she went to London and made her debut June 17 at a special matinee at the Adelphi Theatre as Queen Anne in the historical play, ”The Double Rose,” after which Aug. Harris, of the Drury Lane Theatre, engaged her to support Ristori at his house. Then she signed with the management of the Adelphi, and appeared Nov. 18, 1882, in ”Love and Money.” Later she acted in ”Rachel the Reaper,” after which she returned to the Drury Lane. On March 5, 1884, she created the title role in Sydney Hodges’ ”Gabrielle” at the Gaiety Theatre, London. A few weeks later Lester Wallack engaged her for this country, and she made her American debut June 23, 1884, at Utica, N.Y., with the Wallack Co. in the title role of ”Lady Clare.” She traveled through the West, and in California, about January of 1885, she married Chauncey R. Winslow [1860-1909], a resident of Cincinnati, O. Her New York debut was accomplished Oct. 26, 1885, in ”In His Power,” at Wallack’s. The play was a failure, and was immediately withdrawn. Then Miss Eyre went on the road by arrangement with Mr. Wallack, at the head of Charles Frohman’s Co., playing ”La Belle Russe.” Later Miss Eyre had trouble with Mr. Wallack, and withdrew from the theatre. She was in 1888 divorced from Mr. Winslow, and had since married again.’
(The New York Clipper, New York, Saturday, 12 November 1892, p. 573b/c, with engraved portrait)

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‘Kyrle Bellew, Mr. Wallack’s latest imported leading man, is also an ex-Australian… . He has put Mr. Wallack in an unpleasant predicament. Miss Sophie Eyre was engaged for leading parts this season and Mr. Bellew absolutely refuses to play with her on the ground that she is too large and would spoil his appearance on the stage. So much for having a petted actor in a company… .’
(Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, Ohio, 11 December 1885, p. 3c)